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Accession No i.O-w_5J — I — 

(Ml .....S/?< 



Call No, 



p. 






F 



PERIODICAL FOR THE OFFICE AND HOME 



Established July 20, 18S6 



T 



ZJt 





<8>ul%fjotmi®wtotrt%#tK. 



SAN FRANCISCO, GAL., JANUARY 1, 1910 



$4 Per Yiar 



Baker's Breakfast Cocoa 

A perfect food beverage of absolute purity. 



The pure, high grade, scientifi- 
cally blended cocoa made by 
Walter Baker & Co. Ltd., and 
identified by the trade-mark of 
the Chocolate Girl, acfts as a 
gentle stimulant and invigorates 
and corrects the action of the 
digestive organs, furnishing the 
body with some of the purest 
elements of nutrition. 



A beautifully illustrated book- 
let containing a great variety of 
recipes for home made candies 
and dainty dishes, sent free. 



Walter Baker & Co. Ltd. /S^ ,FC 

DORCHESHER. MASS. 

Established 1780 






If you would consider ex- 
treme comfort and silence 
in your car you should 
consider the Peerless for 
1910 :: :: :: 



H.O.HARRISON CO. 



Guaran 




The Diamond Rubber Co. 



San Francisco 



Los Angeles Seattle 



A CLEAR EYE 

FOR THE ROAD AHEAD IS ALWAYS BEHIND 




One finger puts it in position in a twinkling — or lowers it out of the way. 
The Hydraulic marks the era of the goggleless driver and absolutely 
dustless driving. 

Made in (wo widths and heights 41-inch 44-inch 

$37.50 



41-inch 
$35.00 



including all fittings and either Mahogany or Walnut fillinc-in boards in 6. 9. or 12 inch 
heights. 

At all dealers in up-to-date accessories. 

PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 



Exclusive Coast Distributors 



50 VAN NESS AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 





You can reduce your Gasoline expense by simply 
using PANHARD OIL , 

Try a simple experiment — Keep a close tally on 
your mileage. Oil and Gasoline consumption for one 
month; then try Panhard Oil for one month and you 
will find that both less oil and less gasolene is needed 
per mile besides no carbon and more power . But 
be sure you get the genuine. It is safest to buy in 
Original Cans — (non-fillable). Send for our booklet 
on lubrication. 

L. H. & B. I. BILL Coast Distributers 

543 Golden Gate Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 




E»t»bll«h«d July SO. I&S6 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coaat. 




VOL. LXXIX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 1, 1910 



Ni. 1 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — ?06 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhill, E. C, England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

Th? North Pole is to blame. It should have come down 

to meet Cook. 

On one subject President Taft is as silent as an oyster — 

the North Pole. 

Dr. Cook's lawyer has abandoned the case as well as the 

promised fee. 

All the world has postponed further consideration of the 

Christmas budget for a year. 

The Cuban crisis factory is working over-time, but Uncle 

Sam refuses, to invest. 

Motor joy rides all over the country arc keeping good 

the record of dead and injured. 

New York is to have an eight-story high-school. Ts thai 

what they call "higher education?" 

The general post-office fell short only $17,000,000. Rut 

it is always worth more than it costs. 

What is wanted is chicken education on moral lines. Eggs 

at sixty cents a dozen is a ben hold-up. 

The political future holds in its arms great possibilities 

for the top shelf officials of San Francisco. 

According to the Congressional Record, nearly all the 

great men of the nation arc contributors. 

The man who has to "swear off" to quit getting drunk is 

not worth the waste of words nor the effort. 

Eockefeller has secured a motorcycle for bis personal use. 

He says he proposes to give up the activities of life. 

if things go well in Panama. S:m Francisco may h.i\ . ■ to 

celebrate it in 1914. All ritrbf — we'll be there on time. 

Anyway, Zelaya has money in London to show th 

was noi president of t altogether for his health. 

Did you ever see a railway company that was nol willing 

to raise wage? if permission were given to raise rs 

Gubernatorial fence? are likely to need a lot of help in 

repair work until the primary comes with thunder and hail. 

The high cost of living is likely to continue indefinitely. 

The butcher and the baker arc quarreling over who's to blame. 

It is the way you give it and the intention behind the sift 

that counts, whether it be a diamond pin or a bang on the nose. 

The year 1910 opens with several business booms in its 

incubator, and the cackling of the chicks will be heard every- 
where presently. 

Jealousy should prompt ' to burrv up with the 

waterways. Mars is reported to have made surveys for a 
new canals. 

The haste Taft is making - politi- 
cal jobs mat it that it will pay good D 
right on voting for General Jackson. 



And now they are condemning Taft because he smiles too 

much. They think he should look and behave like a meal axe in 
action. 

Mr. Zelaya escaped on a Mexican warship. He has gone 

to London to look at his bank balance — which represents several 
fortunes. 

Colonel Eoosevelt expects to return in June next, and 

tickets down the New York bay are already advertised by ex- 
cursion boats. 

In Montana the temperature reached 40 below the other 

day, which should mean that on that day one could cross hades 
on solid ice. 

President Taft has been discussing national concern 

the Vice-President. Isn't that a new use to pui the second gen- 
tleman of the land to? 

The people of Maine marketed Christmas trees to the 

value of $60,000. But it is not the tree but the things on the 
tree that makes daddy groan. 

The uncooked food crane lias struck the Fast, bul 

than likely it is nothing more than a i against I 

combine and the Cooks' Union. 

New York society is the gayest this year on record, but 

monkey banquets and pajama masquerade dances are tabooed. 
Sensible a? well rj| conclusion. 

Boston demands of its Mayor that he be the active busi- 

i.m of the town, ami not g society lion. There are other 
rities in the same state of mind. 

Nearly all the cities of the Fnitcd States arc steadily" 

narrowing their lire limit districts and making building p 
more exacting. That is as it should be. 

The "ultimate consumer" will have to postpone bis howl 

until after the holidays. Congress will be too busy meanwhile 
to bother about the high cost of living. 

Another expert at figures has been heard from. II 

ie New England summei ike in mo 

i ban all the silver mines of America take out. 

The Republican insurgents in Congress have no idi 

- up the fight. They will join 
r than yield to Cannon's dictation. 

Carrie Nation is in Washington, and insists on j 

the insurgents, and the rebels are offerins a reward for h. 
ture and. execution by the Cannonites. 

Some one has kept tab, .and he ea\- 

in house eh ry day in New York city. VV • 

be did not .figure out the mile? of elevator travel per A 

The department sustains an annual ! 

i because i 
it one cent a pound and pap nine cents a ponnd for earn 

"Uncle Joe" has made it very clear to Congress l 

"do nothing th foolish blnn 

will unseat the Republican majority next November. 
Speaker are in accord on that question. 

A N woman got so mad at her husband's 

prett\ 

■ 
divorce, the home and $60,000 will appease 



EPETOEU AL 



NT 



Bvidenlly the press of Europe, as 
A Wrong Conclusion. well as many of the leading - 

men, give a wrong interpretation to 
that passage in President Taffs message wherein he refers to 
the Monroe Doctrine. It certainly takes an arbitrary twist and 
distortion of words to make it appear that the President thinks 
the time has come when the United States should abandon the 
doctrine and no longer feel it to he the duty of this nation to 
stand guard over the Latin-American Slates to protect them 
from foreign invasion. What the President evidently meant was 
that nearly, if not quite, all of the South American, not Centra] 
American, States, are now well established republics, with great 
natural resources, stable Governments and progressive ideals, 
and are generally able to take care of themselves. This could 
not fairly be construed to mean that if a European nation were 
to attempt to invade any of them to make conquest of, the 
United States would stand aside and let them rely upon their 
own prowess to protect themselves. 

The underlying principle of the Monroe Doctrine is. that the 
United States could not permit a monarchy, or even a monar- 
chical colony, to be established on either South or Centra] Ameri- 
can soil, because it would he an ever-present menace to our own 
institutions; besides, it has been the policy of this Government 
since its foundation that with the exception of the British pos- 
sessions to the north of us. and the Dutch and French and Eng- 
lish possessions in northern South America, the American con- 
tinent should be a continent of republics as fast as European sov- 
ereignty was thrown off. President Taft merely recognizes the 
steady and substantial growth of the Latin States which comes 
of developing their own natural resources and the adoption of 
progressive ideals of Government, which enables them to defend 
themselves in part, at least, against intrusion, but there is no 
hint anywhere in the President's message that the "doctrine" 
has disappeared, and that hereafter the Latin States will have 
to depend upon themselves to repel invaders. The United States 
still exercises a kind of guardianship upon them, hut in a very 
much less degree than when they would have been helpless be- 
fore a foreign invading army under the banners of a despotic 
Government. 

So far as concerns Central America and Cuba, the Monroe 
Doctrine stands as much a defense for them as ever: but that is 
because they seem to take pains to show to the world that they 
hate national progress and the development of their natural re- 
sources, and especially are they unfavorable to local educational 
systems and the paths of peace. But their backwardness in these 
matters does not release the United States from its Monroe Doc- 
trine obligations. Bather does it make it pretty certain thai in 
order to put Cuba and Central America upon a sound footing 
and make their development sure and certain, not only for their 
own good, but for civilization, the United States will sooner or 
later make them territories, and give them that degree of law 
and order and domestic prosperity which they so much need, but 
refuse to acquire for themselves. 



Great Waterw its 
Projects. 



Plans are maturing for the con- 
struction of the most extended in- 
land waterways transportation facili- 
ties in the history of the world. In 
the United States, all the available rivers are to be made navi- 
gable, and the Congress is expected to not only sanction flic un- 
dertaking, but appropriate *500",n00.000 to carry on the work 
for a period of ten years, but no one supposes that an expendi- 
ture of $50,000,000 a year will be nearly enough to make all of 
the available watercourses of the nation complete thoroughfares 
for water craft, but enough may be accomplished in less than 
ten years to double the country's commerce-carrying agencies 
connecting interior centers of production and accumulation with 
the ocean points of distribution, besides greatly decreasing the 
cost of transportation, which is. by the wav. the heaviest charge 
against production which the farm and mill and factory have to 
bear, next to wages to labor. 

It is an eternal law of commerce that the toll for delivering 
products from producer to consumer must he in inverse ratio to 
distance. If it were not so, a point would be reached bevond 
which goods and wares could not be transported without the toll 
absorbing the entire value of the shipment. It is also a law of 



commerce that the greater the distance between producer and 
consumer the higher the cost of the commodities to the consumer 
and the less the producer gets for his products. Leaving middle- 
men out of the process of exchange, it is seen that the greatest 
charge that is put upon products is the cost of transportation be- 
tween the initial and destination points of the movement, which 
has to be borne by the producer and consumer, and which in turn 
reduces the profits of the producer and increases the cost of com- 
modities to the consumer. The importance, therefore, of ex- 
tended systems of water utilities is apparent because of their 
extremely low tolls or rates of transportation; not only so, but 
water lines of transmission may be equipped with boats and 
barges that require but little capital; moreover, the right always 
obtains to individuals to operate independent craft, which' are 
ever present competitors of consolidated transportation concerns. 

The importance of waterways is being recognized everywhere. 
Canada is getting ready to inaugurate a project for a waterway 
from Montreal to the very heart of the Northwest to the Georgian 
Bay. The plan is to utilize the St. Lawrence River, Lake On- 
tario. Lake Erie. Lake Huron and Lake Superior. Owing to the 
natural waterways that can be utilized, only about twenty-eight 
miles between Montreal and Georgian Bay would require exca- 
vation work, hut not less than twenty locks would have to be 
constructed. The Ottawa Government considers the scheme en- 
tirely feasible, and will give it financial backing: It is estimated 
that' $100,000,000 will he ample to pay the entire cost of the 
undertaking. When completed, it will he the longest ship canal 
in the world, and will have pretty much all the grain and live- 
stock regions of the American and Canadian Northwest to draw 
upon for freight. 

In addition to this Canadian scheme, which provides for a 
waterway of over 440 miles inland, it is said a French syndicate 
is being organized to take up and complete the old Nicaraguan 
project of 170 miles between oceans. The Panama Canal now 
under construction is 54 miles long, and the Suez 100 miles long, 
already completed, makes the total ship canal mileage completed, 
under construction, or contemplated, 764 miles. And all to fur- 
ther the interests of commerce and cheapen the cost of transmis- 
sion of articles of production between producer and consumer. 



A St \te Duty. 



The pier known as Broadway Wharf 
NTo. 1. it was discovered last week. 
was standing simply on its floor, and 
that sixteen of the supposedly concrete pillars upon which it 
was laid were nothing more, each and several, than a rotten shell 
of boards. That the Board of State Harbor Commissioners 
should In' worked up about it is only natural, for a serious dis- 
aster was undoubtedly onlv narrowly averted, as thousands of 
people and tons of freight have crossed this wharf daily. The 
construction company who did the work, however, have no qualms 
in the matter, and say it was simply the fault of the method 
used in the making of cement pillars at the time of construction, 
i lie year 1002. If such is the case, the Board of State Harbor 

C missioners should see to it that the State Engineer examine 

all the other piers built according to this same method. If they 
are tottering on rotten foundations, the construction company 
will have proved themselves right, and entirely unblamable in 
the matter: hut if, on the other hand, they are solid, then the 
State has a right to damages and recovery of some of the eighty- 
four thousand dollars they paid the construction company for 
building Broadway Wharf No. 1. The fact that the work was 
overseen by a one-time member of the Legislature, and passed 
upon by the chief engineer of the State Board of 1902, does not 
prove anything. The chief engineer was probably acting on the 
word of the member of the Legislature, who very possibly knew 
nothing about what was proper construction or what was not; 
and if he was like most members of the Legislature, would be too 
busy most of the time in other places to be seen on the job. The 
wonder is. in truth, that a member of the Legislature should 
have been let oversee a work of this kind. The point of the 
matter is. that the St^ate should make proper provision for doing 
its own construction work instead of relying on the tender mercies 
of any private company, whose business is always to hurry the 
job and reap the shekels. It is a pity we are so dependent on our 
politicians, and that our politicians are in their turn so de- 
pendent. 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



152S ! L 



The News Letter extends to its 
New Year's Gebeting. many readers a wish for the very 

happiest of new years. A trite and 
overdone salutation, perhaps, but what comes from the heart is 
evei Eresb and beautiful. Tt is the artificial things pertaining to 
feeling for which we have no use. Always do we welcome the 
May-flowers, the green grass, and the dew, but the things of 
paper we make with our hands we tear up as easily and laugh at 
their demolishment, for what matters anything that is not true 
— even laughter itself. For that reason let our New Year's 
greetings be not in a perfunctory way, but out of hearts lillrd 
with love, good cheer and fellowship, and our endeavors and 
friendships always ring the same. After all, we get out of life 
just what wo put in it. And the most beautiful and perfect 
thing we put in it and take from it is love. None are so rich 
as those with it, and none so poor as those without it, and every- 
one of us lias the capacity for it. That is all this old world 
needs, indeed — a little more love; a little more appreciation and 
understanding of each other. Some one has said that it is money 
that makes the world go round, hut it is really comradeship — . 
the comradeship that assists. Let this New Year for all of us, 
then, be one of endeavor and assistance, of bigger and brighter 
things, of hopes accomplished and buoyancy taught to the strag- 
gler. Given half a chance, every man is willing to carry his 
own load — but he cannot lift it always across the barriers of our 
anger and hate. Our anger and hate — what does it mean, more 
than the weeping ghost by the silent grave when at last there is 
an end and rest, and the placid stars shine down. Let us love 
each other while we may, for thus do the flowers bloom above 
our dead. And man has gone farther back in turning away 
from his brother than he shall ever go forward of himself. Strive 
we must among, each other, for it means our advancement and 
development, but let us do it nobly or else we really retrogress. It 
is our habit of "kicking back" that is pernicious. We do not: 
yet understand that our selfishness is nothing but fear, and in 
the essential our helplessness is mutual and should bo binding. 
There is room at the top for all, and the face on the lower rung 
of the ladder was not created to be kicked any more than our 
own above. By our terrible enmities over the little things of 
life we have never really been able to arrive at the big. And 
somewhere is a scope of infinite comprehension that includes 
us all. Out of our own hearts, then. Id us walk to our own hap- 
piness — such is the News Letter's best wish to its readers, I" 
San Francisco, to America, and to itself, 



It is inconceivable that Dr. Cook 

The PASSING of Cook. should not have known that so able 

a body of scientists as the staff "I' 

the Copenhagen University would pass by in ignorance any manu- 
factured data concerning his alleged journey to and discoi 

the North Pole. Then why did he try to impose a n 

falsehood of crude ami bungling manufacture upon the world? 
II imiisI lie thai the man's ambition Pot Eame made him ma 
in his madness he overrated hi- own cunning and underrai 

intelligence of (he greatest scientists of modern 01 ancient times. 

His is a case of marvelous mental derangement or daring in- 
solence, lie tried to fool those who canno I id. He sub- 
mitted what he called scientific proof to prove that which - 
lias always held to be false, is. in ■momicallv and mathe- 
matically fcrul thai two and two are five. On his own scientific 
measurements ami conclusions he finds his undoing at the bands 
of the very science he professes to know all its in? and outs — 
a savant, SO to speak. 

lie cannot he as liar of boundless capacity to circum- 

vent truth, because the few grains of truth in his story blazes 
the way through tons of falsehood into which he has woven and 

mixed them. TTis data, after analysis, is not very unlike B 
gold mine. But whj should a man of Dr. Cook's position in the 
social and scientific world try to pas? spurious coin, wtiPn he 
knew beforehand that it would have to stand the test of the 
metallurgist's crucible? The reasonable conclusion is. that 
Dr. Cook's ambition to stand upon the pinnacje of fame under- 
mined his moral nature, and seeing an impassable gulf lying 
between, he i bridge it with a nebi 

fabrications. The bridge fell by his own weight. 



The visit of the Honorary Commis- 
Japanese Development, sioners of Japan to the United 

States, and the throwing of these 
gentlemen in contact with the leaders in our business element, 
has had a very good effect. The estimation in which the Japan- 
ese generally is now held in our business world is second to none. 
The delegation, headed by Baron Shibusawa, was a representa- 
tive one, and gave our own people a better idea of those who 
control in Japan. Were it possible for our financiers to meet 
such men as Mr. Asano, Mr. Soyeda, Mr. Sonoda and hundreds 
of other of the modem Japanese, we should add still more to 
the respect we owe these people. The development of Japan is 
something phenomenal, but there is not one person in a thou- 
sand who, even in imagination, approximates the strides made 
by the people of the island empire in the last few years. With 
every ten years that passes the Japanese have made forty years' 
advance along the road of Occidentalism. Let us hope fervently 
that they will adapt to their uses our virtues alone. 

The Overland Monthly for January will be devoted to the 
Japanese, and the pages of that standard Western magazine will 
give for the firs! time in any American magazine of world-wide 
circulation, and in the holiday number at that, a comprehensive 
view of modern Japan and its development. There will be 
pictures galore, and the text will be replete with interest for 
all readers. Count Okuma, Count Hayashi and other notables 
of Japan have contributed articles, and the whole is the result 
of the indefatigable work of the Overland Monthly's commis- 
sioner, Mr. C. B. Ferguson, who was sent to Japan for Ibis 
very purpose, and who spent five months gathering material. 
To the business man, the exporter, the importer or to the aver- 
age reader, the w hole number, from cover to cover, will be a reve- 
lation. Nothing like it was ever attempted by any other pub- 
lication, ind it may be said that in the success of this enterprise 
the rnanagemenl of the Overland Monthly has placed both coun- 
tries in its debt, for the issue is an embodiment of the motto 
on the cover, "Hands Across the Seas for a Better Understand- 
ing." On the news stands about Christmas. 



The Merchant Marine League is 
Fob i Mi ia ii wt M m:i\i . making pi d have 

the help el i he public in general, and 

no! depend Bolelj npport ea tended by the men of 

if tin associations making for the public good, 
and every pers"ii w!u> is able to do 90 should enroll as a mem- 
ber. It is dependent on ils membership fur the funds with which 
hi cany on tin work that has to be done before and by Congress, 

am] there is a great deal to be accomplished. 

A great obstacle stands in the way of the BUDS in 

and that is General Apathy, and this general hat 
mere \ r the common e<>"d than Napoleon or A 

der ro!l< r ever won battles. If we would replace the 

flag on the seas we must awaken to the ii' . hard 

work, and we mu- I of our < ■ bat we 

the opening of the Panama Canal. San 
lould he a great ship-building port. San Fran 
harbor should he crowded with vessels carrying the American Bag 
a: the mast-head. It should be our duty as citizens {•< so arrange 

matters that in ten years from now the $300, .'"in that 

paid to foreign bottoms be paid to American ship •■ 

thus keep tl home. That is what we pay annually to 

some one else to do our I ring business. Isn' 

shameful? Our merchant marim Ution. 

A liberal subsidy or a systematic a, it makes no n 

which, will | trade. Tl 

Hen : ' ;.. Marin Leag - what- 

1 fpresc - 

must do something, and that 

I f you believe this, join the I the longer the membership 

list th. 



For all the good they do. two-thirds of the gentlemen who 

draw pay as Con veil be at home, only they 

probably would be in mischief if they had nothing to do hut 
work on fences. 



There is another ni' 

- Icntial inauguration changed from the b 

part of April. Then, 
interfere with the parades of th- 
companies from the Eastern cities. Bu 
lent will have to 

- dep- 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 



Weakness oe the 
City Government 



A clean and capable civic adminis- 
tration is hardly possible in con- 
junction with a political Govern- 
ment, nor is such an administration 
possible at all unless founded and conducted upon lines of ap- 
proved business methods and business integrity. Unless a city 
be hedged about in its official conduct by a public sentiment that 
aspires to civic honesty and official purity, its sub- and super- 
structure are established in that which contradicts the truth 
of the community's assumption of possessing a high standard of 
moral sense, and such a municipality lives and moves in an at- 
mosphere of deception. Its colors are. false and deceiving, main- 
ly so because its official conduct is glaringly unethical in theory 
and practice. Not that any one citizen is blamable Eor it, but 
rather because the standard of political municipal administra- 
tion sanctioned and permitted is too low to guarantee 
ethical results. Results of an administration's official labors 
rather than the personnel of the administration should be the 
final measure of its integrity and stability. 

San Francisco possesses all the essentials necessary to make an 
ideal municipality, in so far as the personnel of the majority 
of the electors is concerned, but there is a lamentable weakness 
in the organic fundamentals of the city's Government which 
war against the best interests of the community and prevents 
the installation of an ideal system of Government. The fault 
lies in the imperfections of the city's charter, which contradicts 
the true principles of municipal Government in that it provides 
for political administrations, whereas it should provide only for 
administrations founded on sound and approved business prin- 
ciples and customs. To be sure, the charter assumes incidentally 
that everv transaction of a municipal official shall be in har- 
mony with high business integrity, and that, the standard of 
conduct of the official shall be imbedded truth, justice and hon- 
esty, but the charter does not of itself provide the necessary 
machinerv to accomplish the full measure of either its spirit or 
intent. As we have said, the charter of San Francisco amply 
provides for a political Government and administration, but 
not for a Government to be conducted on strictly business prin- 
ciples. The charter of San Francisco has permitted the custom 
to become a tradition that the successful candidate at the munici- 
pal election may reward his "friends" by appointing them to 
official positions that are highly remunerative. These appoint- 
ments are made as a rule without reference to fitness, ability or 
experience: hence an administration having such a personnel is 
bound to be altogether political with business ability merely an 
incidental requirement. The defects in the existing charter are 
glaring, and, indeed, the instrument as a whole is too weak to 
oblige a strong business conduct and supervision of the city's 
public concerns. A radical overhauling of it is greatly needed, 
so that it will positively and distinctly oblige the introduction 
of sound and approved business methods in the management, of 
every department. 



Development op San 
Francisco's Harbor. 



With the progress of improvements 
along the waterfront of San Fran- 
cisco, two facts become prominent. 
One is that there must inevitably he 
a decided readjustment of the local ferry terminals, the other 
that the growth of the commerce of the port more than keeps 
pace with the addition of wharfage. 

The readjustment of the ferry terminals is inevitable. At the 
present time, every dweller across the bay, who does business in 
San Francisco, wishes to be landed at the foot of Market street, 
and so do probably 90 per cent of other ferry passengers. The 
vesult is, that there is alwavs a congestion, both of ferry boats 
■and of passengers at the present ferry building, which conges- 
tion grows steadily greater. A common sight is to see eight 
ferrv boats within a hundred yards of each other, receiving or 
discharging- passengers and then moving out. That accidents 
are rare is a tribute to the skill of the captains, especially in 
thick weather. The tax upon the transportation facilities up 
end down-town is correspondingly great. 

The remedy, which far-seeing men are agreed upon, is a re- 
adjustment, or rather a redistribution of the ferry terminals, to 
the end that the Sausalito ferry will be at the foot of Van Ness 
avenue ; the Santa Fe at the foot of Lombard street : the Key 
Boute and the broad gauge of the Southern Pacific where they 
now are. at the foot of Market, and the narrow gauge at the 
loot of Second street. 



Such a readjustment would ease the situation materially, and 
would distribute the ferries in such a manner as to relieve con- 
gestion at all points. 

The increase of the ferry business will be brought about not 
alone by increase in population, but by the increase in the de- 
mand for the ferriage of automobiles, which the Southern Pacific 
Railroad has recognized in the recent construction of the 2,700 
ton ferry steamer Melrose, to be used especially for the transpor- 
tation of automobiles. 

'['lie second prominent feature of the development of San 
Francisco as a seaport is the conspicuously notable fact that, as 
fast as additional wharfage is provided, under the provisions of 
the recent bond issues, it is quickly put to use. The commerce 
of the port grows as fast as, if not faster than, the new water- 
front facilities. A single evidence of this is found in the fact 
that in ]S9T there were 843 inspected steamers in San Francisco 
of a total lto=s tonnage of 144,560, while in 1908 there were 
415 inspected steamers, of a total gross tonnage of 450,777 ; 
in other words, in eleven years the tonnage of the port, in steam 
vessels was trebled. Furthermore, in the past 20 years, the com- 
merce of San Francisco has never shown a decrease. 

The character of the shipping of the port has changed mater- 
ially. The sailing ship is vanishing, being replaced by the 
steamer of large tonnage. In 1896 the largest steamer running 
regularly to and from San Francisco was the City of Peking, of 
5,079 tons. In 1909 the largest are the Manchuria and the Mon- 
golia, of 13,638 tons. 

The discovery and use of fuel oil in Galifornia has had a 
marked influence upon San Francisco's shipping. When coal 
was used, it was transported hither from England and Australia, 
to which places great, sums of local money went for the purpose. 
Kow. about nine-tenths of the steamers plying to San Fran 
use oil as a fuel, with the result that it is estimated that $20,- 
Ofin.nofl annually is held in the State which would otherwise 
have gone abroad. 

The reclamation of waterfront property by the State, to be 
leased afterwards to corporations, will, it is believed by experts 
and investigators, result in San Francisco being a free port in 
two or three year-, as the rentals will be sufficient to pay for 
the maintenance of all wharves, and provide a sinking fund for 
the retirement of the improvement bonds. 



It is to be observed that Congressmen are taking a deeper 

interest in the ship subsidy and waterway questions as they near 
the date of the next election. The people will want to know, you 
know, before voting day. 



Japanese capitalists have purchased a large body of land 

in Brazil for immigration purposes, without first consulting the 
San Francisco Asiatic Exclusion League. There is food for a 
lot of Billingsgate oratory in that. 




m CHAS. KEi LUS 3 et 
R EXCLUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 



31 



No Branch Stores. No Agents. 
THE HIGH-CLASS TAILORING THAT WE PUT INTO OUR CLOTHES 
IS FROM SUCH INSTITUTIONS KNOWN FOR THEIR FINE WORK. 
CLOTHES WE SELL IN THIS SHOP CONTAIN THE HIGH ESSENCE 
OF CLOTHES ART AND DESIGNING. FROM THE TIME OF SPONG- 
ING UNTIL THE PRESSMAN'S FINISH EVERY DETAIL IS 
WATCHED. 



WE WISH 

EVERYBODY 

EVERYWHERE 



A MERRY 



nTk*«'7t»-tl - * /if CHRISTMAS AND A 

Vi>*7as ) a/\£tlus & (iln, HAPPY NEW YEAR 

J^an jfbmcisnax 



"Our clothes" are not those nasty factory clothes that are 
turned out by the thousands and thousands and made in sweat 
shops, or even worse places. Those kind of clothes are kept 
In almost any store, but not here. Not much. Our clothes 
are masterpieces, from makers who are foremost and recog- 
nized for making the best hand-tailored clothes. Such work 
Is a total stranger in "factories." You may have been 
"tipped" that our prices are high. Don't believe it; they're 
not; our clothes are good. 



Jewelers Building, Posl Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



QMb Y®«r=I$@@Iks Sh@w ©Ely Yerfkg IRM@™§ 

By Harriet Watson Capwbll. 



On Tuesday at 12 o'clock the California Club members gath- 
ered for their annual founders' day breakfast. No outsiders were 
permitted, so it is not possible to cavil at the caviar canapes, nor 
to sniff at the sweetbreads hand-made from breast of veal. Yet 
I can tell you that Puree of Bok was served with every course 
at one of the tables, for the presiding member at that table told 
me all about it afterwards. Statistics prove that seven-eighths 
of the total membership of women's clubs represent the marriage 
relation. It is good mathematics to figure that three-fourths of 
that seven-eighths represents the domestic relation, while the 
other fourth represents the tabloid life as illustrated by the 
apartment house and hotel. The three-fourths, committed to 
providing three squares a clay, are therefore interested in the 
recipe for Puree of Bok. The housekeeper, who is incidentally a 
clubwoman, is always alert for some new culinary trick that 
will differentiate her luncheon from the ubiquitous repast. She 
likes to exhilarate her guests to the "oh, my !" state at some 
clever conceit of her cookery. So I regret to confess that while 
Puree of Bok is sure to be served at every club luncheon in 
the near future, most of the clubwomen find it very indigestible. 
After getting out the annual "year book" and presenting the club 
activities in most attractive form, it makes the clubwoman swal- 
low hard to have the editor of the Ladies Home Journal arraign 
their worth in a front page article. Everywhere clubwomen are 
discussing Mr. Bok's quarrel with the Women's Clubs. My 
California Club friend says that all the women at her table de- 
cided that the work which Mr. Bok would have them do is 
"muck raking," and there is time to do that when they have 
performed the cleaner duties at hand, gardening, playground, 
and the etceteras that still need their attention. 

Mr. Bok asks several pertinent or impertinent questions, ac- 
cording to your viewpoint. Likewise he puts a period after the 
interrogation before you have had a chance to answer the ques- 
tion. 

He asks: "What has the average woman's chili dune on the in- 
sistence by the parent of a clearer understanding of self, sex 
and life in the mind of the child?" Immediately, he answers. 
"Absolutely nothing — judging from the 'year-bo 

The second interrogation pricks a neglected Said of endeavor. 
"What has the average woman's club done to agitate or prevent 
the needless blindness of thirty-three per cent of little blind 
babies? This is surely a mother's question; yea, a woman's 
question, if ever there was one. Yet not a 

is in a single programme, report or 'year-book' of a woman's 
club!'" 

I shouldn't call thai a field tha; had to be "muck-raked." It 
is probably the nexl interrogation that fixed that phrase. •'What 
has been done by the Woman's club toward the curse 

that is the one direct cause of sen ling eighty per cent of the 
women of to-day to the operating-table? If ever there was a 
tn.il woman's que - is one. Yet not a word: not an ac- 

not an apparent effort from a single woman's club, 
as one can - 

Mr. Bok has complaint to make because clubwomen have not 
thrown their strength toward making the marriage laws more 
stringent. "Careful students of social eon, In, 
that at this end of the marriage relation lies the most effective 
solution of the divorce problem which confronts us. Here is 
a question which directly affects every mother of a daughter, anil 
yet not as much as a mention of the subject appears in any 
woman's club report for the past year." 

This critic has still more interrogations in his locker. He 
asks: "What has the average woman's club done toward the 
abolishment of tin' public drinking-cup i 
etc.? — an evil that to-day threat ::"e of every ehi 

an Lnsis laws that will prohibit tl indies 

in stores or on the .:• ;t mention, so far .- 

in any woman's club report." 

on of all. and one to conjure with — ' 
has th. dub don- -ion in 

newspapers of indecent advertisements relating to private dis- 



eases, quack nostrums, dangerous 'beauty' remedies for the skin 
and hair ? Surely here is a woman's question in. which lurks 
danger for herself and her child. But where, outside of Massa- 
chusetts, is the record of the woman's club movement on this 
evil?" 

This critic evidently finds that the club year-books show that 
clubwomen are only yearlings in the reform business. They have 
not yet reached erect and full-grown human stature, according 
to the Bok measurements. Possibly his is the only system of 
measurement by which perfect fit and workmanship are guar- 
anteed to produce the correctly tailored clubwoman. But it 
seems to me that he is trying to drape a large-sized garment on 
a Misses' size model. Women's chilis are not yet ready to take 
up some of the reforms with which he would have them busy 
themselves. They are developing their muscle, doing setting-up 
exercises, measuring their strength, and in due tune they will ar- 
rive at sex problems, operations and patent medicines — the sort 
of work my friend from Lhe California Club designated as muck- 
raking. As for infant blindness, and public drinking cups, 
there may be no record of any endeavor in these special lines, but 
women's clubs have certainly exerted their strength in parallel 
causes. Right here in San Francisco they have waged war 
against the unsanitary conditions of the public drinking foun- 
tains, with the result that the most flagrant abuses have I n 

corrected. They have made crusades against all sorts of evils of 
unsanitary nature parallel to the shameless microbe infested 
cup and the exposed candy which keeps open house for am 
sieut microbe with a sweet tooth. It is only in recent years that 
clubwomen have turned their attention from Belf-culture to civic 
endeavor. They have but lately diverted their attention from 
the short eiits to culture to follow the sign-posts on the road 
to civic reform. Handicapped mot exercise 

suffrage to bring about reform, they hi made 

themselves felt — which is very creditable ami most amazing, all 
[hint's considered. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Mush's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




HV FAVORITES 



THE BEST CHOCOLATES IN THE WORLD 
IN THE MOST ARTISTIC BOXES EVER MADE. 

THE BOXES CONTAIN ONLY CHOCOLATES 

WITH NUT CENTERS OF SUCH PURITY, 

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•ETU. STMES Ut UlES 




San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 




Mrs. Fritz Kreisler, wife of the famous violinist, is quite as 
much of an individuality as her husband, but in most of bier 
attributes the direct opposite of him. As he is an idealist of 
the highest order, so is she a woman of the most practical kind, 
and of excellent common sense and sound judgment. Moreover, 
as an American girl, and with the gift to express herself elo- 
quently, she deals out a frankness that is both startling and 
original. Asked by the writer if she favored woman's suffrage), 
she replied quickly and emphatically in the negative. "When a 
woman wants to rule," she said, '"let her put on her best dress 

and look her prettiest. She has . . . 

more power that way than she could 
positively have through the ballot 
box, and anyway she is not fitted to 
vote." Then, while the writer's eyes 
opened their widest and he suddenly 
realized what he had been up against 
all of his life, Mrs. Kreisler went on 
to explain. "My sex." she continued, 
"have two great failings of which 
they have never been able to rid 
themselves. One of these is that 
thef are nearly always illogical, and 
the other that they are given to tell- 
ing little lies." 

"And you, as an illogical woman, 
never had any desire to be a suffra- 
gette and storm parliament?'' she 
was asked. 

"No," she rejoined. "I wanted 
one thing and I got it — my hus- 
band." 

'Tou found me quite worth 



which is not saying that her feet arenot charming, too. 

* * * 

San Francisco has long been famous for its foreign colonies. 
Its Chinatown and its Latin Quarter have become world-famous, 
the scenes of many a story in prose and verse. Later, its Greek 
and Slavonian quarters grew into being, and now it has its Fili- 
pino-town. This is situated along Stockton street, and the 
streets crossing it northwest of Chinatown. Few people are aware 
of the large number of Filipinos who have come to this city to 
dwell. There are many Filipino students at the University of 
California, but there are also Filipino shop-keepers and Fili- 
pinos engaged in other industries. In the new colony there are 
Filipino restaurants and also the Rizal Club, named after the 
patriot executed by the Spanish, its members being well-to-do 
Filipinos. They are reported by the police to be an orderly 
colony, keeping to themselves and seeming to enjoy their new 
abode. 

* * * 

Just think of it! One hundred and sixteen barrels of 



fresh, of course, have arrived in Canada all the way from 
China. It is an experimental shipment, and if it promises well, 
San Francisco will get a trial of a cargo. 



while, didn't 
Kreisler. 



you?" spoke up Mr. 



Waited upon by six very beauti- 
ful young ladies, candidates for 
queen of the Mission festival, the 
committee of the Mission Promo- 
tion Association found themselves 
rather up against it last week. The 
maidens were neither shy nor awk- 
ward, but such could not be said of 
the men. Like so many rabbits, they 
withdrew into a corner where, with 
pink, wistful eyes, they stole furtive 
glances at the six beautiful girls. 

"How are we to judge them, any- 
way?" whispered Oscar Hocks to 
Henry Burmester. 

"Then suddenly William N. Foley 
had a brilliant idea. "I tell you," 
he said, "we'll look at their extremi- 
ties ; no, I didn't mean their tongues 
— their feet." 

"But should we go to that 
length?" asked Joseph Holli, seri- 
ously. Then he wilted suddenly, as 
consciousness came to him. 

"Sir," reproved Henry Burmes- 
ter, "I will give you to understand 
that the feet of the daughters of the 
Mission are not long." 

And so the debate went on with 
footnotes. But when the committee 
chose Esther Kelly they must have 
one and all looked into her eyes — 




Instantaneous 
Answer 



DISTANCE 
TELEPHONE 




Sending a message is only half of the 
liansaction. The other, and equally im- 
portant, half consists in getting back the 
answer. 

Sometimes this is a reply to a question, 
or the acceptance or rejection of a pro- 
posal. Sometimes it is simply an acknowl- 
edgment that the message has been 
received. 

The value of the message depends upon 
getting an answer. 

When a general manager sends word 
to a representative in a distant city, he 
wants to know that his man is there, that 



he receives the message, and that he will 
act 

If the answer is not final, but raises 
another question, there is no delay. The 
other question can be settled at once. It 
is possible, in one telephone interview, 
to come to a decision which could not 
have been reached without the instan- 
taneous answer. 

Each answer is made instantaneous by 
the Bell telephone service. 

The Bell system, with its ten million 
miles of wire, provides the instantaneous 
answer for anybody, anywhere, at any 
time. 



Increased use of the Long Distance Telephone means greater 
results in every line of human endeavor. Telephone 
efficiency means One Policy, One System, Universal Ser- 
vice. Every Bell Telephone is the Center of the System. 

American Telephone and Telegraph Company 
And Associated Companies 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



Here is a fable of the period. Once 
upon a time a certain City Editor of 
a big daily had a spite against the Friend 
of lie Man Who Would Be Mayor. And 
ii City Editor, in order to discredit his 
Enemy with the Man Who Would Be 
Mayor and all other men, published an 
untrue story about how his Enemy had 
been chased across three counties for cer- 
tain funds belonging to the public which 
he had in his keeping. The other papers, 
however, wrote the story "correctly, and 
proved that the reputed mis-doer had ex- 
cellent reasons in the matter. And now 
the Man ho Would Be Mayor is Mayor, 
and the Other Man is still his Friend. 
Moreover, he will occupy beside the Mayor 
a position of trust and importance. And 
six months from now another city editor 
will take the place of The One who wrote 
a lie to discredit an enemy. So doth our 
chickens come home to roost, for little 
faults should not be magnified. 

At the feet cf Miss Alice Lloyd, play- 
ing at the Orpheum, fell a tiny bunch of 
violets, thrown by one of her admirers. They were such a very 
tiny bunch of violets to offer to a queen of vaudeville, but Miss 
Lloyd put them to her lips and blew a kiss. 

"All violets are from the gods, don't you know," she said. 
« * * 

The police seem to be singularly blind to the objectionable 
ten-cent shows which flaunt their suggestive advertisements of 
Salome and couchee-couchee dances in the faces of passers-by on 
certain of our principal thoroughfares. These enterprises make 
appeal to the lowest sensual instincts. They place lurid pictures 
or models of scantily-garbed females in their show windows; put 
up the "Men Only" or "No Boys Allowed" sign in their door- 
ways, and otherwise suggest that there is something going on 
inside that is decidedly risque. This, however, is really the bail 
set to catch the coin of the foolish and lascivious. After paj ing 
his clime, the visitor is ushered to an ante-room, where some in- 
nocent show is given. Then, when the crowd is large enough, 
and the "barker" has worked his victims up to the proper pitch 
of expectation of something nasty, some more or less voluptuous 
females arc trotted out, and it is announced that, by paying 25 
cents more, the patron may enter an inner chamber, where these 
Eemalea will perform some immoral dance or other. Everything 
is done to excite the sensuality of the visitor. Saving b 
lieved of the extra two-bits, the visitor is taken within, and 
there a crude series of contortions may be executed i>\ the 
painted females, but as b general thing there is nothing but a 
disgusting exhibition of ungraceful movements calculated 
the victim on to further expenditure of bis money. The whole 
affair is a brazen insult to decency, as well as a clumsy form 

of extortion. 

» * * 

There is iiiiuli gratification among many California^ 
the assignmeni of Rear-Admiral Reginald 1". Nicholson to duty 
as Chief of B treat ol Navigation in the Navy Department, one 

of the most important posts in the sendee, "lo uu • ■" Nicholson 

is well known on this coast, where he has spent more time dur- 
ing his life than on any other station. He is popular as well as 
efficient, and his last two commands have been of Pacific-built 
ships — first the cruiser Tacoma and afterwards the battleship 

i mo:' constructed at the Union Iron Works in 

lv. the latter at the yard of Iforan Brothers, in Seattle. 

"Reggie" x from an old naval family, to the lus- 

whieh he has personally added, especially at the bat 

Santiago, whi n be acted gallantly and well. 

* * * 

The Mail Order World, which is published in Lakeporl 
York. has. in its issue for duly an article which is siu>> 
he the firs! and only truthful statement of how a Cleveland 
news|> 1 the entire Bast, mJ notably the 1 

ispers, and - ie "first authentic pictures" of the big 

San Francisco fire. The auth ock. Th. 

of the article may best he judged by San Franciscans who will 
take the trouble to read the concluding paragraph: 

in ? a. m. until T :30 the engr 1 at the big job. 



POWDER OF SOME SORT 

MOST OF THE TIME 
BY MOST OF THE PEOPLE 

A careful census shows that NINE 
TENTHS of the Women use a Washing 
Powder. The others might be called the 
"Submerged Tenth". Some use SOAPY 
powders.others NON-SUDSING powders 
with Soap, but Powder of some sort Most 
of the Time - by Most of the People. 
<I The Well-to-Do — those who have the 
*■ Finer things to care for— who use Wits in 
stead of Muscles, use PEARLINE, the 
J ORIGINAL and BEST Soap Powder. 
<I The more Intelligent and Careful the 
^ Woman the more surely is she a PEAR- 
LINE User. She knows PEARLINE 

1 insures Perfect Cleanliness with Least Labor, 

I- i use Soap- It's simply a that PEARLINE is Harmless to Skin- 
waste of inferior material to use Fabrics and Colors — in fact it preserves 
ig except Your Wits to help them. Think of the Saving in washing 



.njuimy eA^epi i uui wns uj ueip meni. i ninrc or me oavmg in wasning 
PEARLINE-MODERN SOAP.[ | without rubbing-PEARLINE does that. 



and at 8 o'clock our extra was rushed on the street containing 
four solid pages of half-tones, one of them, an excellent half- 
page picture of devastation and solitude, with the pall of smoke 
hanging over the doomed city, and terror-stricken fugitives flee- 
ing across the river in all kinds of boats and rafts." 

Oh, Muenehausen ! Oh, Eli Perkins ! Oh, Ananias ! Oh, 
Jack London ! Here is a fellow who can beat you all ! 



E. B. COURVOISIER, 
Art Dealer, Frame Maker. New store, 431 Sutter street, be- 
tween Stockton and Powell. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, wdio is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



SAMISHS 



1378 Sutter St 



Phone Franklin 2127 




HAND PAINTED CHINA 

MONOGRAMED° ' DINNERWARE 

Decorated to Order 



Christmas Gifts 



10 Discount 

On all Orders Placed £y December 18th. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 




The political history of the nations 
Progress of the during the year 1909 shows greater 

Nations in 19u9. gains tor the people in the direction 

of personal and political liberty 
than in any previous twelve months since the world began. The 
leaven of political and personal liberty which was lodged in the 
human heart and mind by the spirit which moved the people of 
the Americas to throw off the yoke of one-man rule by divine 
right more than a century ago, seems to have been mysteriously 
but forcibly active during 1909 almost the world over, insomuch 
that the year 1910 begins a new decade under conditions that are 
marvelously strong for further curtailment of kingly authority 
and satisfactory enlargement of the sovereign rights of the in- 
dividual. That high sense of the truth of the gospel of individ- 
ualism and personal and political liberty which actuated the 
Fathers of the world's greatest republic has permeated all lands 
only to assert itself against absolutism, and during the last year 
absolutism has nearly everywhere yielded to the demands of the 
common people to be heard. Never before in the history of the 
world did the people of the nations have so much voice in the 
administration of the public concerns of their own country, 
nor their hereditary rulers so little. Nearly every nation of the 
earth is now, January 1910, governed by laws enacted by a Par- 
liament composed of men from the ranks of the masses and 
chosen by the masses themselves. Surely the subjects of kings 
made great strides in the last year in the direction of securing 
recognition of their own divine right to rule. 

Since the close of 1908, autocratic Russia has yielded little by 
little to the demands of the people for a constitutional monarchy, 
and to-day the Uouma or Parliament is as firmly established as 
any other branch of the Government, nor will the time ever 
be again when absolutism will rule Kussia. The people have 
by their own might achieved a victory which means political' 
rights for them, together with law-making power of the nation 
in their own hands. During the year just closed, China has 
adopted a constitution and granted Parliaments 'to the provinces. 
Persia won in its battle for a Constitution and a Parliament. 
Turkey, the cruel and arbitrary, has surrendered to the people 
and adopted a Constitution. Thus during the year 1909 the 
four most despotic nations in the world yielded to the demands 
of their people — Kussia, China, Persia and Turkey — and all of 
them now are under laws enacted by the people themselves by 
their Parliaments. It may be said in truth that the sun of the 
year 1910 does not shine upon a single nation that is ruled by 
one possessing autocratic power, nor upon one that is without a 
constitution and laws, and where more or less personal political 
liberty does not obtain. Never before was there so much per- 
sonal liberty for the common people of the world. The divine 
right of kings to rule and govern according to their own sweet 
will is nowhere recognized. Everywhere Czars and Shahs and 
Sultans rule under the authority of constitutions and laws of 
their subjects' own making. 

Notwithstanding all these steps forward and upward toward 
the heights of the human right to life, liberty and the pursuit 
of happiness, the awful spectacle is presented of more than 
two million men armed and equipped as soldiers never were be- 
fore, in alignment on the firing lines of possible battle-fields. 
These long lines of men, armed, ready to begin the dreadful work 
of human slaughter, are the result of a world wide craze for ex- 
traordinary preparedness for war, whose infection has permeated 
every nation. Naturally, the climax should be a world-wide war, 
but rulers and statesmen and diplomatists stand horror-stricken 
before mental pictures of the consequences that would attend 
such perfect preparedness if turned loose upon fields of carnage. 
They are scared at their own destructive machinery, and ruler 
and statesman and diplomatist is bending his energies to avert 
the natural climax. Fear has taken the place of boasting and 
show of prowess, and the strong and great minds of the world are 
busy trying to solve the problem of how to safely withdraw their 
two m il lion fighters from the firing line and engage them in 
the channels of commerce, of industrial pursuits and in tilling 



the soil. And yet, while standing before the face of this perfect 
preparedness for war and trembling at the thought of the 
mightiness of the destructive power of the man-killing machinery 
they have wrought, ruler and statesman and diplomatist are 
agreed that the fiendish work of enlarging and strengthening 
existing preparedness for war must go on; that the limit has 
not yet been reached, and that the natural climax is inevitable. 
When or where the climax may be looked for is uncertain, but 
undoubtedly the recent coalition or treaty between Kussia and 
Italy as principals and the Balkan States as direct beneficiaries, 
creates the most inflammable conditions, for all concerned in the 
contract have not hesitated to say that the purpose in view was 
to protect the Balkan region and Montenegro against the designs 
of Austria and Germany — against the Germanic combine to 
spread toward the Mediterranean and toward Bagdad in Asia 
Minor. Since the treaty between Italy and Kussia, which had 
the approval of England and France, was signed, Bulgaria and 
Servia have formed a rapprochement, the wording of which in- 
dicates anything but friendship toward either Germany and 
Austria-Hungary, but plenty of liking for the new Turkey. 
Therefore, the ^Near East remains the storm center for Europe 
and Manchuria, for China, Japan and Russia. 



Whether the wise thing to do or not, 
Of General Interest. results will have to be awaited to 
tell, but the ministry of King Ed- 
» ard has opened the campaign for tlie budget in a spirit that a 
century ago would have been called high treason. The issue has 
been forced by Asquiih, aud it is the masses against the Lords. 
He tells the country frankly that the large land-holders are try- 
ing to escape their duty as taxpayers, and that if the common 
people do not sustain the Commons they will have to go down 
into their pockets for money to maintain the royal house and the 
Government. It is conceded to be a dangerous thing to do lest 
the common people go too far. 

China has appealed to the nations to restrain the avaricious 
hand of Russia in Manchuria, especially in superceding China's 
right to administer the laws, which are of Chinese origin. 

Japan is planning to put a subsidized merchant marine 
in between her own ports and those of China and the Philippines. 

The Parliament of Persia is in perfect harmony with plans to 
encourage agriculture and industries by granting liberal conces- 
sions to capital, but the young Shah insists that meanwhile Rus- 
sia shall withdraw her troops that were quartered upon Persian 
soil a year ago to preserve order. 

Not in a quarter of a century has there been so little war talk 
as now. Nevertheless, there is not the slightest indication any- 
where of retrenchment and reform in expenditures for war pre- 
parations. 

Parties in England and Germany are trying to effect an Anglo- 
Germanic combination, and the French diplomatists are keeping 
their eyes and ears wide open. 



THE NATURAL FLAVOR 



of the richest and purest cow's milk is retained in Borden's Peerless 
Brand Evaporated Milk (unsweetened.) It is especially adapted for use 
either plain or diluted on breakfast fruits or cereals. In coffee and 
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FINE BORDEAUX 

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FROM 
SCHRODER & SCHYLER & CO. 



THE OLDEST SHIPPING HOUSE 
IN BORDEAUX, FRANCE 



Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coas^t 



San Francisco 



January 1, .1910. 



and California Advertiser 




'IMSWE'ailND 




10, Jffj*mm3U J Xxx*3-S./*~l 



"The Man From Home" at the Valencia. 

This play was brought out some two years ago at the Stude- 
baker Theatre in Chicago, where it had a run of almost an en- 
tire year, and then was shown in New York, where it duplicated 
its Chicago success. It is without doubt the most successful effort 
of Booth Tarkington and Harry Leon Wilson. The play makes a 
distinct appeal to our Americanism, and can be enjoyed just as 
hugely by the gallery gods as the people down stairs. It is a 
comedy with a telling and effective dramatic strain throughout, 
and where the comedy seems to lag, the dramatic interest is 
taken up. The authors did a daring thing in placing the scene 
of their play in Italy, and in order to get the right atmosphere, 
they have placed a number of genuine Italians in the cast. The 
play as a whole is simply delightful. It is away from anything 
we have seen in a long time. It is something new in dramatic 
ideas. It is full of splendid situations, and the characters seem 
to be living and breathing figures and not mere puppets. In its 
wholesome exuberance it is simply refreshing and exhilarating, 
and stirs our sluggish blood to renewed activity and makes us 
feel proud of our Americanism. True, the authors have taken 
some license here and there in order to obtain desired effects, 
and have worked coincidences overtime, but we have come to 
expect such things, and in the present instance we readily for- 
give these little shortcomings when so much is gained. We un- 
hesitatingly state that "The Man from Home" is the best com- 
edy we have seen here in a long time, and we earnestly request 
every theatre-lover to see it. It is without the question of a 
doubt the neatest and brightest dramatic offering that we have 
had in years. This is a broad statement, but witnessing the play 
will justify the writer's judgment. The company seen here is 
not the original one, hut it is nevertheless a Bplendidly balanced 



organization. Henry Hall plays the man from home, the part 
done so well in the Eastern company by William Hodge. Hall 
is a lucky selection for the role, as he fills every physical require- 
ment, and invests the part with enough of the twang of the 
hoosicr to seem the genuine Indiana article. Hall is only a 
youngster, but a few years from an Eastern dramatic school, bul 
see him in the part, and then you will agree that he is simply de- 
lightful. In but one scene does he fall short, but he "is so good 
throughout that we overlook this. Our dear old friend, Charlie 
Herman, one of the best of our Shakespearean and legitimate 
actors, is seen in a modern role, playing the part of the Grand 
Duke. It is the first time we have seen him play in twentieth 
century clothes, but in every way he justifies the confidence of 
his managers by giving a most artistic and dignified rendition of 
a very difficult role. Long life and success to Charlie. He is one 
of the grand old men of the legitimate American stage. Har- 
rington Eeynolds. our old friend of the Erawley days, is seen as 
Hawcastle. His hair is a little more silvered with years, but he 
is the same painstaking and conscientious actor. Vaughan Tre- 
vor is very good as a frightfully overdrawn English character. 
John Martin is capital as Ivanhoff, and Leonard Howe is satis- 
factory as the young American. Mary Elizabeth Forbes, a niece 
of James Neill, who starred out here some years ago in "Bar- 
bara Frietche," has the leading feminine role, and acquits her- 
self very well. She looks pretty, and her work carries conviction 
and sincerity. Emma Meffert and Bertha Welby are also very 
good, and round out an altogether admirable cast. There are a 
number of small parts done by Italians, who form an important 
part in the various stage pictures. The scenery is very pretty, 
in keeping with the country and locality. "The Man from 
Home" is what you have long been looking for, so do not miss 
seeing him. 

* * » 

Ezra Kendall at the Savoy, 

"The Vinegar Buyer," the play used by Kendall, is the same 
concoction that our own Prank Bacon tried out some years ago 
and shelved as being a very poor piece of theatrical property. 
After sitting through two acts of the play, we certainly coincide 
with our friend Bacon, and heartily agree with him in his judg- 
ment of the aforesaid play. A worse excuse for a plav we 









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9ns Weinburg and some of the Dancing Sn owli rd e in "Tl oming to the Savoy Thai 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 



rarely seen. It is almost pathetic to see the childish efforts that 
Kendall makes to invest some of the lines with his alleged puns, 
the same that he has sprung on a long-suffering public for lo ! 
these many years. What is the matter with Kendall, anyhow? 
Is he entirely devoid of ambition altogether? His present 
methods and efforts do not in any way enhance, brighten or il- 
lumine the traditions and pages of our American stage. He has 
been working along his present lines for some time, and to all 
intents and purposes he is making giant strides backwards. Ret- 
rogression seems to be his watchword. It is a pity, too, because 
Kendall has undoubted ability of a certain kind, and if there 
is any spark of hope and ambition concealed about his rotund 
personality, thi is the psychological time for him to kindle it 
into active being. We can forgive many things, but we cannot 
forgive lack of ambition when every condition tends towards 
the easy culmination of real earnest and sincere efforts. Kendall's 
work is absolutely slipshod and careless, and at limes his utter- 
ances seem positively maudlin. How he has the temerity to 
spring his old, time-worn jokes is a puzzle. And some of them 
are so frightfully far-fetched, too. He consumes, for instance, 
between five and ten minutes on the moss-grown antiquity about 
witch hazel and Pond's extract. These things are a positive in- 
sult to our intelligence. His followers and admirers have been 
very loyal to him in the past, but he is nearing the danger mark, 
the dividing line that heralds the coming of waning popularity. 
At present writing he is still a good drawing card, and his houses 
locally have been of good proportions, but it is a physical impos- 
sibility that such conditions will continue if he persists in follow- 
ing his present methods, and does not give his public more con- 
sideration. It is a pity, too, that such sterling players like Rob- 
ert Ferguson and Julia Stuart and Lottie Alter have to waste 
their undoubted ability on such wishy-washy rot. They deserve 
a better fate. Liebler & Co., who are managing Kendall, have 
as a rule been credited with being wise and far-seeing managers, 
and we are at a loss to understand how they allowed the present 
affair to come into existence. Possibly they reckoned that the 
popular-priced house would stand for almost anything. In this 
thought they are right to a certain extent, as careful observation 
has shown that the patrons of this class of theatres are composed 
greatly of the middle or working classes, who care not a thought 
about the really artistic. They want to be entertained, and 
anything or anybody who can make them laugh, satisfies them. 
Deep down in our hearts we cannot believe that Kendall is will- 
fully and deliberately sacrificing and throwing away an un- 
doubted brilliant future. He will no doubt awake to his pos- 
sibilities and opportunities. We sincerely hope so. Our Ameri- 
can actors of the present day are a very limited lot, and we can 
ill afford to lose Kendall. 

* * • 
^ Peter C. Georgis, a Greek actor and author, repeated at the 
Van Ness theatre last Sunday matinee and evening his perform- 
ance of his own adaptation of a Greek play, called "Golfo." Mr. 
Georgis has clothed the play in pretty fair English, some of the 
lines having real poetical flavor. The action is rather halting 
and stilted throughout, the author showing very little knowledge 
of dramatic situations, and the faculty of sustaining the inter- 
est. Then there are long, dreary stretches of immoderately 
drawn out speeches and scenes, "if the manuscript was placed 
in the hands of a stage manager with a good blue pencil, it 
would improve it immensely. As a play reflecting Greek peasant 
life, it is rather a doubtful proposition, for beyond the Greek 
costumes, it seems to all intents and purposes to typify 
nothing m particular. Mr. Georgis had the temerity to attempt 
the leading role himself. As an actor he is a positive joke. He 
has not the faintest idea or conception of acting, and the role 
affords unbounded opportunities for good work. He simply les- 
sens the value of his own play in this way, as his funny antics in 
the more serious scenes of the plav mitigated severely against the 
conscientious efforts of his supporting company. The east was 
selected from students of Hie Paul Gerson Dramatic School 
Miss Mabel Muhs, in the title role, was particularly ell',, '.,. 
giving the part real feeling, and a surprising lot of dramatic 
repression She has a future worth watching. Mr. Baston was 
quite effective, displaying a fine voice and presence, thoueh not 
at all times understandable. Mr. Bisbee was satisfactory as 
was Mr. Clark. Robert Leslie was overweighted with a pari 
which was entirely beyond him. He gave it his earnest attention 
however Raymond Roper was good in a light comedy role' 
Miss Schuyler was really good as the Mother, her elocution b. ing 



a delight. The same can be said of Miss Smith. Some small 
parts were in competent hands. The play was properly mounted. 




William II. Crane, who will appear as the opening attraction 
at the New Columbia Theatre on Monday, January 10th. 

* * • 
David, Warfield at the Van Ness. 

"The Music Master" is a symphony of the soul, attuned to 
throbbing heart-strings, depicting and laying bare the poignant 
emotions and sufferings and longings of a human soul. War- 
field's Anton von Barwig is a classic. It will be enshrined in the 
hall of artistic fame and memory. It will take its place beside 
Mansfield's Beau Brummel and Irving's Mathias or Becket and 
Booth's Hamlet and Jefferson's Rip. No doubt we are this time 
saying good-bye to this much-loved and whole-souled personality. 
as the fickle public are already demanding something new of 
him, particularly as he has played the role for a number of years. 
He has already tried to sever connections with this, his first love, 
but to no avail. We are assured, however, that this time it is 




Be Clean — Use 

DUNTLEY 

PNEUMATIC 

CLEANERS 

"Not a Toy" 

Electric and hand power. See our six sizes for home 
use from $38 to $140, with full set of cleaning tools. 

S. F. Compressed Air Cleaning Co. 

Both Phones Sutter and Stockton Sts., S. F. 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



good-bye to Von Barwig forever. Take heed, then, you lovers 
of the truly artistic, even if you have seen this wonderful crea- 
tion before, because it is a stage representation that you will not 
see often during the course of this busy life. Somehow or other 
we are not ashamed of our tears when we see "The Music Mas- 
ter." His honest soul has the simplicity of the child. His long 
and patient suffering stirs our deepest and best emotions. After 
it is all over we feel so small, because we seem to have been placed 
in the crucible of public opinion, which has brought out the 
narrowness and pitiful meanness of the unseen depths of our 
most secret selfish emotions, and we have been found wanting. 
Warfield has rounded out the character in its entirety, and it is 
now a wondrous bas-relief, an artistic gem, fit to hold its own in 
the limited gallery of the dramatic immortals. What a wonder- 
ful thing this dramatic profession is. To look back only a few 
years we can se'e Warfield shuffling around the Weber & Field 




comparatively a very young man. His career is practically be- 
fore him. A conscientious student of the drama, living a clean 
life, striving for all that is best and truest in his art, he should 
attain to the pinnacle of greatness, the coveted goal of many, the 
realization of few. 

A recital of the plot of the play is ttnnecessary, nor is any 
comment on the merits of the play timely. This has all been 
done before, and most of you have already laughed and cried with 
this dear old tortured soul. Warfield has illumined with his 
wonderful art the dramatic pages of our contemporaneous Ameri- 
can stage history. He has given us a characterization that will 
live in our memory as one of our most cherished stage figures. 
And we in San Francisco are proud of him as he is one of our 
own, a San Franciscan in very fact. His company with some 
exceptions is almost the same as last year. Janet Dunbar plays 
Helen Stanton, and gives it intelligence and earnestness. While 
not so prepossessing in appearance as one might wish, and per- 
haps not as spontaneous as one conld desire, still she is satis- 
factory. The part is such a good one that one could hardly be 
otherwise. George Wellington is Beverly Cruger. He looks al- 
together too young, appearing, one might say, as if he was just 
ready to enter hish school in place of getting married. Dear 
Marie Bates is still the Mks Houston. She almost seems like 
the companion picture of the old music master. The other char- 
acters are practically distributed the same as before, and the 
settings are faultless and complete in every minor detail. The 
stage management is beyond criticism. We earnestly advise 
every lover of real dramatic art to see Warfield in his wonderful 
character study. It will live in your memory for many a day, 
and its sweetness and broad humanity will help to temper that 
selfish strain which is rampant in us, and in its place will grow 
n sweet, tender blossom of human charity and nobility of char- 
acter. 

(Continued to Page H.) 

Vrirt Now Thpntrp CORNER VAN f™ 88 AVB 

v \Aiiv ivroo j. ivKj\xi/i xj and orovb street. 

Phone Market 500 
Beginning Monday January ud. Second and last week. Matinee Saturday 
only, no Sunday Performances. David Balasco presents 

DAVID WARFIELD, 
in Charles Klein's comedy-drama "THE MUSIC MASTBR". Seals $2 to 50c. 
January roth— OLGA NETHERSOLE in 'The Writing on the Wall." 



New Alcazar Theatre 



Corner Suiter ind Slriner Street! 
Phone w.-,i 1400 
Balasco and Mayer, Owners anJ Managers. Absolutely "Class A" Building. 

Week commencing Monday. January *rd, an elaborate production of George 
Ade's greatest comedy. 

THE COLLEGE WIDOW. 
With all the original features and real collegians in the cast. 
Prices — Night, 3^c. to $i; Matinees, j^c. to 50c. Matinee Saturday and Sunday. 



Dreamland Rink 



Stetner Street, near Sutter 



Starting Monday Night, Jan. 10, and every afternoon and evening, including 
Saturday. Jan. 15. Wm. Morris presents 

HARRY LAUDER 
Scotland's Idol— England's Pet— The Man Who Made King Edward Laugh, and 
his All Star Company including Julian Eltinge. direct from their sensational New 
York success. Reserved seats from 50c to $3, on tale at Sherman. Clay and 
Co.. Commencing Monday, Jan. k 



Savoy Theatre 



Phones Market 130 
Home* J 3822 



McAllister, near Market. 

This Saturday afternoon and evening, last times of Erra Kendall In THE VINE- 
GAR Bl'YER. Starting Sunday Matinee. Jan. 7. other Matinees Thursday and 
Saturday. Wm. P. Cutlen offers tor one week only. 

THE ALASKAN 
The Totem Pole comic opera, with Richard F. Carrol. Gus Weinburg and a big 
company of Comedians; revised, retuned. reconstructed girls full of songs: songs 
full of girls. Prices 15c to $1.50: Thursday Matinee. 35c. 50c and -5c. Seats at 
the Theatre and Emporium. 
Next: "The Wolf." 



New Orpheum & 



Hurry Lauder, the world's greatest comedian, who COI 

Dreamland week after ne.rt with an all-star companu. 

• • • 

stage in New York convulsing his audiences with the nonsensi- 
calities of his burlesque Hebrew types, and here he is to-day in 
the very forefront of dramatic power, a name to conjure with 
and to command wholesome respect and splendid admiration. 
Thus does true greatness find its level, and Warfield is still 



FarTell Street. 
Bet Stockton and Powell. 

Safest lad Most M«rnific*nl Theatre in AaKrica. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 
Most positively last of ALICE LLOYD. England's daintiest and most has 
commedienne: The McNaughtons: The Brothers Peraaoe. In conjunc 

A GREAT NEW SHOW 
Franklyn Underwood and Fn- -tna* Ba<..? Grand 

Opera Quariet; Belle Davis and her Cracke- 
Orpheum Motion Pictures. Ri week only T 1 -. ■ 

ing prices io. *?. 50. 75c. Bo* Seats Ji.oe. 
Holidays) 10. 75. soc. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 




tfS0CIBTX 






^L 




(T 



Last Sunday afternoon, the ladle rattled amazingly in the egg- 
nogg bowl. Every one was at home the day after Christmas, and 
instead of tea, toe holiday nogg, with its egg and 'sky and cream 
and nutmeg, filled the glasses to the foamy brim. And every- 
where the hoys and girls ehatted over the remarkable news that 
proved to he a canard, but was accepted as the real thing until 
late in the evening. "Have you heard that Genevieve Walker is 
going on the stage?" was the interrogative form of breaking the 
news. Appropriate fainting fits down center front, with tableauB 
expressing surprise and doubt to right and left. Then everybody 
would come to. and if there was a Btranger in the midst, Miss 
Walker's social status, genealogy, weight, height and color would 
be given in detail. "Step-granddaughter of Mrs. Eleanor Jim- 
tin. Yes. her mother was one of the two daughters of old man 
Martin. Married a Philadelphian and divorced him for good 
and sufficient reason. No. she never inherited a slice of the Mar- 
tin fortune, but Mrs. Eleanor always looked after the girls, and 
gave them a convent education, and Genevieve had taught in a 
kindergarten near Philadelphia, when she was graduated. Eor 
the last three years spent much of her time out here with Mrs. 
Martin, to whom she is very 'svmpatiea.' 

"Yes. it's really true about the stage. She's going to join 
Billie Burke. Met her when she was out here, and confided her 
stage aspirations ot the sunset haired actress, who has ever since 
been trying to make a place in her company for Genevieve." Then 
would follow a discussion of the dramatic possibilities of Miss 
Genevieve, and of course all her good friends were perfectly sure 
that she had no talent, and was making a dreadful mistake, 
forfeiting the regard of her fairy godmother for the hazardous 
quest of the footlights. There is a well nourished delusion 
that many an amateur actress is precipitated on the professional 
stage by the exaggerated regard in which her friends hold her 
talents. This delusion was fostered in the Never-Never Land, 
and maintains permanent offices on earth, though how it pays 
rent I do not know, for in all my experience I have never heard 
an amateur's friends boost behind the back. 

When every one was saying "poor Genevieve," a i rusty messen- 
ger made the rounds and threw a boomerang into the excited 
camps. "Billie Burke, the actress! Going on the stage! Hot!" 
And after that period, another exclamation. "Billv Burke!" 
Spelled Billy, not Billie! Late of Dublin, and for some time a 
visitor in San Francisco. Genevieve's engagement to Billy 
Burke is a matter of keen joy to Mrs. Martin, who is a distant 
relative of the young man's father, who is a wealthy resident of 
Dublin." 

Thus did the stage idea go up in the air like a bunch of Fourth 
o' July firecrackers, and now every one is genuinely felicitating 
the young couple, whose marriage is not to be long deferred. 
While we are listening to the distant sound of wedding bells, a 
melody at hand strikes the ear. On Wednesday of this week, 
Miss Maidie McMahon became Mrs. Antoine Borel, Jr. The 
pretty ceremony was not characterized by any of the elaborate 
details of an ultra-fashionable wedding. There was just one 
bridesmaid. Miss Lupita Borel, the youngest sister of the groom, 
ami Louis Borel, a brother, served as best man. A handsome 
home at San Mateo is awaiting the occupancy of the vouhl' cou- 
ple, and after a honeymoon in the South thev will receive their 
friends there. 

When Miss Jean Tyson becomes the bride of Harry Weihe she 
also will have a spicky-span, brand-new home to move into, for 
her father has already selected a lot in town and plans are heing 
made for the new home, which he will present to the younu neo'- 
ple as his wedding gift, ft is surprising that so many parents 
squander thousands of dollars on the wedding, thousands more 
on extensive silver service, which is afterwards set up in a com- 
paratively modest rented apartment and kept in a semi-tarn hed 
state by the one maid. How infinitely pleasanter ro begin tar- 
ried life in a home without a landlord. 

Evidently orchids for every occasion, are not first cousin to 
orange blossoms in the case of Miss Harriett Alexander. For 



Palace Hotel 
Company 



^ 



Wishes you all a 
Happy New Year. 



-J 



several seasons, without consulting Wizard Burbank, society hor- 
ticulturists have been able to transform, graft, or blend, orchids 
into orange blossoms. The daily bunch of orchids has 
taken on the significance of the engagement ring, and Miss 
Alexander has for some time been under the hotannical 
supervision of Professor Onmdy. But now she an- 
nounces (hat in spring she' will go abroad as the guest of Mrs. 
John Bidwell, of Chico, which is confusing to the cardiac scien- 
tists. Miss Harriett spent most of her school days in the home 
of Mrs. Bidwell, and with the latter's sister, Mrs. Alexander, of 
Washington, D. C., will tour the continent. On the same 
steamer on which Mrs. Bidwell has i nations. Mr. B. 

W. Hopkins and his daughter, Miss Flossie Hopkins, will sail. 

The young boys and girls home from Eastern schools and col- 
leges for (lie Vuletide holiday were entertained on Tuesday even- 
ing by Miss Mauricia Mintzcr at a dance which was as elaborately 
appointed as grown-ups could demand. Save in the matter of 
Brines, the affair had all the elegance which Mrs. Mintzer im- 
parts to any form of hospitality. Not a little of the week's hos- 
pitality was extended to the young people who have not yet 
heard the school door bang securely shut. Virginia and Frances 
Xewhall, although they have made their social debut, elected to 
return to Boston this year to take a post-graduate course, and 
their return for the holiday season has been made the motif of 
a great deal of informal entertaining. On Tuesday, Miss Agnes 
Tillman gave a luncheon in their honor, a dozen other girls re- 
sponding to the invitation to gather around the gay luncheon 
table. Tuesday evening the William Bourn- gave a musicale in 
the Poniatowski place at Burlingame. which they are occupying 
this year. Fritz Kreisler, the master violinist, delighted the 
guests, who were recruited from the musical people in the smart 
set. and in consequence they were transported to the faery lands 
by lieir Fritz. Mrs. Kreisler and her husband are the most 
convincingly devoted pair I have met in many a moon. Some 
one asked Kreisler where he proposed to spend his vacationing. 
and with a loving look toward Mrs. Kreisler he answered : 
"Wherever the wife chooses — Germany this year." Then some 
one tried to tell the violinist the story of the English Lord who 
chanced to meet his wife in the library where she was getting 

off answers to invitations. "You. too, are going to the " 

he said. "Ah. Then we shall see each other in the autumn." 
But Kreisler didn't see the joke. The entente cordiale of fash- 
ionable pairs who just happen to run into each other onee in a 
while at house parties is no pari of his matrimonial creed, 

Henry Von Schroeder returned last week from his school in 
New York, and is with his parents, Baron and Baroness von 
Schroeder, at the St. Francis. 



BLANCO 


* 


s 


O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS 






PHONE FRANKLIN 9 






No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 


finest cafe in America. Cur new annex 


is 


now 


open. 







Januaby 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



The delightfully quaint and beautiful custom of singing the 
Christmas carols in the Palace Hotel on Christmas eve was re- 
vived for the first time since the fire on last Friday night. The 
full choir of the Holy Innocents Church sang first in the lobby 
of the Fairmont Hotel and then came down to the Palace. The 
rosy-cheeked boys and girls in their white robes made a pleas- 
ing picture as they moved slowly around the magnificent court 
6f the hotel, their childish voices singing the message of Peace 
on Earth, and good will toward men. 

Another pleasing custom which was always observed at the 
Palace, and which will again be this year, is that of seeing the 
old year out and the New Year in. All the tables in the main 
restaurant, the main grill room, and the banquet room, have 
been reserved, and the festivity which will take place there will 
be one long to be remembered. Mumm will be the wine of 
p reference. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank Proctor, who spent a few days in town at 
the St. Francis during a shopping expedition, had luncheon with 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis MacDermott and Mrs. R. C. Carpenter. At 
the other tables were Mrs. Eleanor Martin, with a family party, 
among whom were Baron and Baroness von Schroeder and Peter 
Martin, and Mr. and Mrs. Henry T. Scott, with Prescott Scott 
and a few friends. 

New Year's will be ushered in with appropriate ceremony at 
the Fairmont Hotel by a subscription ball given by a number 
of the well-known society folk of the city. The affair is being 
arranged by Mrs. Heller, Mrs. Friese and Mrs. Brandenstein, 
anil promises to be one of the most elaborate ever given in this 
hotel, which has seen so many beautiful functions. The ball 
room and red room will be used for dancing, and supper will be 
served in the main dining salon. 

Among the recent arrivals at the Fairmont are Dr. W. A. Mc- 
Enery and Miss Therese McEnery, accompanied by Miss Isabel 
McLaughlin. The McEnerys have been abroad for nearly a 
year, and their friends are delighted to know that they intend to 
make this their home from now on. Miss McLaughlin will re- 
main over the holidays, and then return li> New York, where she 
is attending one of the fashionable finishing schools. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lee Rubens and Miss Mabel Rubens, of Chicago, 
Mr. and Mrs. Grenville Clark, also of Chicago, are guests at the 
Fairmont. 

The guests at the Hotel Victot I b dance on Christ- 

mas night, and on the evening before, fchej made merry at the 
large Christmas tree which was erected in the Hotel office. 

Mrs. Charles Sutro, who lias been visiting at I VI Monte for 
the last week or so, had as hex guesl Mis- Helen Sullivan. The 
young ladies spent nearly every day on the 17-mile drive, lunch- 
ing at the Pebble Beach Lodge, and motoring in Mrs. Sutro"s 
louring Packard car oxer the tti 

Professor R. E. Allardice, of Stanford, is at Del Monte for the 
mid-term holidays. Professor Allardice is an ardent golfer, and 
every vacation is spent on the links. 

Miss Anita L. Murray, a (banning wati 
Francisco, but who has been sketching in and about the M m- 
terey Peninsula, is a guesl of Mrs. Henry Clay Qninby at Hotel 
1 VI Monte for the Christmas holidays. 

Amen- Hi at the 

St. Francis I s girls 

who are to appear in the musical extravaganza, *i' 

"ii." Las! Thursday the Japs 1 in the 

ial ball room, going through the catchy songs and dance 
with no end of merriment. The girls wire chaj iy Mrs. 

Berry, wife o( Admiral Berry, and Mrs. Robert J. Woods. The 
Japanese group includes m^ s Elizabeth Miss Wilmot 

Holton, Miss Josephine Hannigan, Miss Ruth Richards, Miss 
Dorothy Woods, M ss Gertrude Perry. Miss 
Schrader, Miss Olga Atherton, Miss Eh a de Pue. M -- 
M;-< Clarita Blair, and an equal number of b 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

A comfortable, high order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN. formerly manager of St. 
Dunslan's. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNION SQUARE 

TABLES FOR NEW YEAR'S EVE 
MAY BE RESERVED NOW. 

Under the management of JAMES WOODS 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 




HOTELSAVOY 

SEATTLE 
•■T„c!v<. Suriei of 

Sojld Comfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping district. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, & 1.50 op 




POP CORN 
ROAST APPLES 
SWEET CIDER 
DANCING " 

and a grand good time at the old fashioned NEWYEARS EVE PARTY at 

Pebble Beach Lodge 

Write for particulars (o 

H. R. WARNER, Hotel Del Monte, Cal. 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. Sun in Every Room. 

Elaborate Furnishings. Excellent Cuisine. Large Lobby and 

Reception Room. Grill Room. Dining Room 

Mrs. W. F. Morris. Proprietor, formerly of Hotel Cecil 

Bush Street San Francisco 

European and American Plan 



Hotel 


Westminster 


Los Angeles, Cal 

Fourth ud Mai St. 




American Plan 








REOPENED 








Rate* p«r Day. $2.50 Rooms without Bath. 
Rocim with Bath. 13.00. $3.50 and MOO. 






European Plan 








$1.00 j»r day and up 
With bath. 11 SO and up 






F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 







■a-a . i j-\ r> FRITZ MULLER & SONS 

Bismarck Cafe j^u 

Leads in catering to San Francisco's epicures and music lovers 
POPULAR PRICES 
Music noon, evenings and after theatre by the famous Herr Ferdi- 
nand Stark's Vienna Orchestra 
PACIFIC BUH-DINQ San Francisco MARKET AND FOURTH 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januaet 1, 1910. 



ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
(Continued from Page 11.) 
The second and final week of David Warfield's engagement 
at the Van Ness Theatre will commence with the performance 
of "The Music Master'' on Monday night, January 3d. The 
week of January 10th will be devoted to Olga Nethersole in her 
new play, "The Writing on the Wall." In addition to present- 
ing this really great play, she will also appear as "The Second 

Mrs. Tanqueray," "Magda," and "Sapho." 

* * * 

The Orpheum will retain Alice Lloyd, the singing comedienne, 
for next week only. Pranklyn Underwood and Frances Slosson 
will present the diverting comedietta, "Dobbs' Dilemma;" The 
Basque Grand Opera Quartette, French vocalists, who dress in 
Alpine costume, and render numbers from "II Trovatore," "Mar- 
tha," "Frou Frou d' Amour," and other favorite operas; Belle 
Davis and her colored pickanninies, and Fox and Foxie's Circus, 
which introduces, besides Fox, a capital comedian, trained dogs, 
cats and Foxie, the smallest horse in the world, will be the new 
acts that are sure to hit the popular taste. The marvelous Klein 
Family, German Comedy Cyclists, whose engagement was inter- 
rupted by the Orpheum Boad Show, will return for next week 

only. 

* * * 

Ezra Kendall and company will make their last appearance 
at the Savoy Theatre in "The Vinegar Buyer" this Saturday 
afternoon and evening, and commencing with a special matinee 
Sunday, with the usual matinees on Thursday and Saturday, the 
new "Alaskan," fresh from the triumph of a five months' run 
in Chicago, will begin an engagement limited to one week. 

"The Wolf," Eugene Walter's remarkably strong play of life 
in the Canadian wilderness, will follow "The Alaskan" at the 

Savoy Theatre. 

* * * 

It is seldom that an artist of world-wide reputation visits 
this country without being outside of New York, but Harry 
Lauder is the exception, and nine weeks were played last season 
without an appearance save in the metropolis. This year San 
Francisco has been fortunate enough to secure him for a week, 
commencing Monday night, January 10th, with performances 
every afternoon and evening thereafter, including Saturday, 
January lath. Dreamland Bink, on Steiner street, near Sutter, 
has been secured for the engagement, and will be temporarily 

transformed into a comfortable auditorium. 

* * * 

On Monday night, January 10th, the firm of Gottlob, Marx & 
Company will open the doors of the new and magnificent Colum- 
bia Theatre, which has been in course of construction for the 
past year at the corner of Geary and Mason streets. When Wm. 
H. Crane appears as the opening attraction on Monday night, 
January 10th, he will have the honor of dedicating the finest 
playhouse San Francisco has ever known. The Frohman star is 
to present George Ade's comedy, "Father and the Boys," and 
will be surrounded by his New York company, including Mar- 
garet Dale, Louis Massen, Mildred Beverly, Elsa Payne, Vivian 
Martin, Forrest Orr, Percy Brooke, Arthur Holman and others. 

The auction sale of seats for the opening night will be held on 
Tuesday afternoon, January 4th, at one-thirty o'clock, in the 
ball room of the St. Francis Hotel. The proceeds of the sale I 
will be donated by Gottlob, Marx & Co. to local charities. The 
regular advance sale of seats for the engagement opens Thursday 
morning at the box office of the theatre. 

* * * 

The Alcazar Theatre will continue George Ade's comedy, "The 
College Widow," for another week. The play has been so well 
received and the demand for seats has been so great that the 
management has decided on a second week in order that the pub- 
lie will have an opportunity to see Ade's greatest comedy. 

The Pacific Underwriter is out with a very quaint little 

folder wishing one good luck and happiness for the year. It re- 
flects the undoubted talent for the new and the elastic ingenuity 
of Mr. Will G. Taffinder, the editor of the journal in question. 

Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 



New York 




P»rls 



ir*< v apODn T£o. 
139-141-143 Geary Si.. Bel. Grant Ave. and Stockton 



SEMI-ANNUAL CLEARANCE SALE 
All Suits, Dresses, Coats and Skirts, at one-half 
price; Petticoats at greatly reduced prices; 25 
per cent discount on all waists $5 and over; 
Furs at 5 per cent off their value. 



Gassner's Handsome CQQ 
Black Fox Sets, at #*>0 

A very popular fur this season. 
This fur is long, lustrous and silky. 
It is made in the new animal effect, 
and lined with shirred chiffon silk. 
Same style in POINTED FOX, at 
$50 a Set. 

LOUIS GASSNER Inc. 

Manufacturing Furriers 

112-114 Geary St., San Francisco 




Ladies 
Tailor 



It is with great pleasure that we announce the opening: of our down town establishment 
at 418 SUTTER STREET between Powell and Stockton, with the newest material! of im- 
ported and domestic patterns of high quality. We have always succeeded in pleasing our 
customers and are now better prepared than ever before to give perfect satisfaction. We 
have the latest approved styles from the leading fashion centers of the world, and our gar- 
ments are guaranteed to fit perfectly. 

Fair Prices, Best of Work, Fine Materials. Correct Styles. Perfect Fit. All that's Latest, 
All that's Good. Your trial order is respectfully solicited and we invite you to call whether 
you are ready to place your; order or not. Very respectfully yours, 



Oscar Vogel 



A SKIN OF BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

OR MAGICAL BEAUTIEIER 

Removes Tan. Pimple*. Freckle*, Moth-PatcrVea, 
Rash tod Skin Diseases, and every blemish on 
beawiy, and defies detection. It has Hood the test 
of 60 year*; no other hat, and ii so harmless we 
taste it 1o be sure it is properly made. Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The distinguished Dr. 
L. A.S&yresaidloaladyof thehaat-t«s)(apatiem): 
"As yoo ladies will use lata, I recoasmead 'Cob- 
rand's Cream' a* tbe least baratfal of all tbs Skia 
preparatioBi." . 

For sale by all Druggists and Fancy Goods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infants and aduth. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritationi, cures Sun- 
burn and renders an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cents, by Mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removet Superfluous Hair. Price $1.00. by mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Propr. >7 Great Jones Si., New York C.iy. 




January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



A NEW FEAR'S WISH. 
The strength to suffer and be strong, 
The will to choose the right, 
The light of joy in the sky by day, 
The star of hope by night. 
The bliss of content in honest toil, 
The strength of manly pride, 
The glory of independence and 
The loved one by your side. 
The true regard and faith of your kind, 
The nearly cloudless skies, 
The soul to look the world in the face, 
The ignorance of sighs. 
The chance to uplift a failing friend, 
The lust to play your part, 
The courage to bear your cross alone, 
The true faith in your heart. 
The knowledge that's taught by experience, 
The calm of rectitude, 
The patience to work amioying things, 
The night's beatitude. 
The skill to play the game of life fair, 
The mind keen to enjoy. 

The will that it gained through the pain of age, 
The pure heart of a boy. 
Add what you wish from the store of good, 
And in your hearts know then, 
We wish you all that you wish us, 
In Nineteen Hundred and Ten. 

Will 6. Taffinder. 



Considerable interest is being shown in the piano recital 

to be given on January 23d at the Van Ness Theatre by Blanche 
Lillian Kaplan, Miss Blanche is the twelve-year-old daughter of 
lteverend Dr. and Mrs. Bernard M. Kaplan, and is a pupil of 
Mr. S. G. Fleishman, who is well known both as a pianist and 
as a teacher. She is already displaying unusual ability as a 
performer. Her .friends are predicting great things for her. 
The wonderful control which she has over her instrument is a 
marvel to all who hear her. Iu addition to her tine talent she 
has grace and beauty — two valuable assets for the concert stage. 
Dr. and Mrs. Kaplan intend to take the girl to Europe after a 
few years, where she will complete her musical education. 



In these days of suddenly changing weather there is only 

one texture eminent physicians are agreed should go next to the 
skin in the matter of underwear. The Deime] Linen Mesh is the 
fabric in question. It is made up into the modern bealt 
ment. Wool absorbs and retains perspiration, and it is demon- 
strable that many cases of disease are due to the wearing o 
gathering woolen clothing. The possibility of this kind of in- 
fection is entirely removed by the use of the Deime] Linen Mean, 
and besides the hygienic values, we find that the texture of the 
fabric is so altogether an agreeable one that it can be recom- 
mended for the wear of infants. The headquarters of The Dei- 
mel Linen Mesh Company is at 142 Sutter >m vi. San Francisco, 
right in the heart of the business district. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



The Star Hair Remedy, the best tonic ; restores color to. 

gray hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. All 
druggists. 

RABJOHN & MORCOM 

Paintings, Engravings. Picture Framing and Artists' Supplies 
Free Art Gallery 



240 POST ST. (near Grant Ave. - ) 
SAN FRANCISCO 



408 FOURTEENTH ST. (near Broajw.n 
OAKLAND 




The 



lafonin 

Piano 



The choice of the Worlds' 
Greatest Prima Donna. 

Madame Marcella Sem- 
brich, both in concert and 
private life. 



The 



laliJuiin 



Piano 



Recipient of the Worlds' Highest Honors at all International 
Expositions. Should be your choice. 



©^Sal&iuinflto. 



MANUFACTURERS 
Pacific Coast Headquarters: 3 i O Sutter St. near Grant Ave. . S. F. 



Coughlan Co. 

(MRS. J. SHEEHAN) 

FINE MILLINERY 

will be in their permanent location about 

January 1, 1910 

at 

49 Grant Ave. 




Phone Douglas 1833 



R. Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 

SI LICK PLACE, off Sutter, ■■ewe— Kearar aa4 Monfgooaen 



A. W. Besft 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Cla 

Day and Night 



Illustrating; 
Sketching: 
Painting: 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 



Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M. 
and by appointment 

Phone Douglas 4138 



Galen Bide.. 391 Sutter Street 
San Franciaco 



DON'T BORROW TROUBLE." BUY 

SAPOLIO 

'TIS CHEAPER IN THE END. 




CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



acomoarat>*< better taaa aa? acker la its tint 
A Little Lower Priced Taaa tke Otkert 

Ben]. Curtaz & Son 

113-117 Kearny Street near Post 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januahy 1, 1910. 



TFrH ATT TAVERN CO. 

X J— I V- » X 1x1 %• COR. EDDY and POWELL STREETS 



Special 



Phone Douglas 4700 

Restaurant, Cafe, Ladles' Grill 

Lunch served during shopping hours. 



Concerts daily during Lunch, Shopping hours, 
Dinner, and After Theatre. 

The orchestra is under the leadership of the gifted and talented 
young Violin Virtuoso, Abe Wise. 

Under the management of MR. A. C. MORRISSON 




New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

11,1 N. W. Corner 
flOtei Polk & Post StS. 
San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 



Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 



AS YOU LIKE THEM— 


Cuisine 
Service 
Surroundings 

and 
Music 


PORTOLA CAFE 


FLOOD BLDG. 
Powell and Market Streets 



328 Bush Street 

Below Kearny Sireet 
PHONE KEARNY 1812 



Jules' Restaurant 

Music every evening by Fred Epstein Orchestra 

™,.,„„-„„ „ Dinners, Sundays and Holidays 

DINNERS. With Wine 75e With Wine, S1.00 

Open NEW YEAR'S EVE. Music. MAKE RESERVATIONS 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 




The McCarthys were the most picturesque features of 

the Palace Hotel opening. But the word painters of the news- 
papers overlooked them in the tourny of adjectives. The McCar- 
thys 1 refer to are "P. H." and "White Hat." It is not so many 
years ago that "P. H." was a functionary around a hotel — the 
California. You rang one bell for ice-water, two bells for high- 
balls and three bells for "P. H.'' to come and correct a refractory 
window. He was the house carpenter. Now he is the Mayor- 
elect of his city, and the honored guest at the opening of the 
finest hotel therein. The other McCarthy, who was in glory 
around the hotel, was "White Hat," the horseman. He was the 
only man who wore the habiliments of yore. Even the chastening 
influences of a fire could not drive "Uhite Hat" into a Tuxedo, 
nor take from his head the jaunty, fuzzy, indifferent, yellow, 
shaggy, soiled, bedraggled plug hat. 

There is going to be a lot of rubbish about aviation. The 

men who are at the head of the game seem to think that they have 
a sport which must be guarded as carefully as horse-racing or au- 
tomobiling. There was some dispute raised over the point of 
whether or not the Aero Club of California would be permitted 
to have the sanction of the Aero Club of America for its meet, 
to be held in January, because some little detail of red tape 
had not been carried out. In popular sports, like automobile rac- 
ing, where there is more opportunity for frauds and fakers to 
corrupt the sport, it is proper that there should be a national 
body to control and sanction contests. But it seems to me that 
aeroviation as a sport is too young yet to be stifled with rules and 
regulations by a hierarchy of highbrows, in their majesty, the 
Aero Club of America decided that Los Angeles may yet have 
its meet. 

Is the California Club preparing some more advice to 

maidens for this New 1" ear's eve? Last year, if you can remem- 
ber that remote period, the ladies of the exemplary organization 
promulgated a doctrine of militant virtue that was the honor 
of the age. The proclamation of advice contained about two 
hundred delightfully ingenuous words, which could be boiled 
down into the famous adage of the ages: "Have a good time — 
but be careful." The girls of San Francisco were warned of the 
dangers that lurked in the wine-cup, and of the headaches that 
were to come on the following day. And as a matter of fact, the 
girls of the city behaved with commendable decorum. It was 
only the matrons of the set that sights society with wistful 
telescopes — and possibly some society matrons, too — who tum- 
bled from the pedestal of dryness with a bump. 

Poor Dr. Cook ! May the Lord have mercy on his mind. 

There is something wonderful in the mentality of a man who 
could fool the entire world with a story like he sprung. To 
appear out of the North with the great fiction of the decade 
requires an imagination and a poise which only a great man could 
have. Of course, Dr. Cook's name, if the University of Copen- 
hagen is right, will go down to the ages with that of Ananias 
and the other liars of sacred and profane history. He played 
a trick on the world, a stupendous deceit. It is difficult to find 
a word of opprobrium sufficiently hard to lash him with. A man 
who commits a crime like Cook's is almost immune from or- 
dinary punisliment — the world is too dazzled by the audacity 
of the offense to recollect an adequate epithet. 

The citizens of Piedmont, cultured, artistic, and alTthat 

sort of thing, you know, object to the location in their classic 
midsts of a sanitarium for the cure of the liquor habit. It is 
right that they should protest against an incursion of victims 
of the demon rum, John Barleycorn and the laughing lady of 
the champagne. It is proper that they should protest to the 
authorities against the establishment there in sacred Piedmont's 
polite shades of an anti-liquor institute. But they overlook an 
important consideration. Think, Oh, Piedmontese, how con- 
venient it must be to have the "-cure" next door. 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



The California Teachers' Association meeting in this city 

this week has started a campaign for pensions for super-annuatod 
school teachers and other officials of the school department who 
are crowded out by age. Under existing conditions, school 
teachers are, for the most part, paid inadequate salaries, and 
probably when they are old they are in need of some extraneous 
income to keep them from the poverty against which their mea- 
gre savings could not provide. But the teachers are attacking 
the evil at the wrong end. Why not make a fight for adequate 
salaries — for wages large enough, so that out of their income 
they can provide for their own old age, and not be wards of the 
State. But teachers, like poets, rather pride themselves on the 
impracticability of their elan. 

Can a man be paid a salary which will insure that he be 

honest? There are many moralists who trace dishonesty to pov- 
erty, and blame the sins of the thief on the cupidity of his em- 
ployers. But how about the latest scandal in San Francisco? 
Joseph E. Birmingham received $500 a month in salary, and in 
addition to that, he received dividends from the firm he worked 
for. Yet he has admitted that he "withheld" (the prison record 
calls it larceny) $175 from his employers. Probably he needed 
the money, or he would not have taken it — but the ordinary 
employee, who never aspires to a $500 salary, would imagine 
that such a wage would place one beyond the need of stealing. 
That does not seem to be proven, however. 

This story may not be true, but it was told by a talented 

liar who circulates about the St. Francis Hotel, so it must be 
founded on fact. He says : "On Christmas night, as I was walk- 
ing along Union Square, I was accosted by a panhandler. Now, 
I have turned over in profits about $25,000 this last month, so I 
felt charitable. I said to the beggar: 'Old man, you have my 
sympathy, and I will be good to you. If you wait until I have 
this dollar changed, I will give you a dime and distribute dimes 
to all the mendicants I meet. I'll be back in a minute.' And 
the beggar replied: 'Say, boss, if it is all the same to you, you 
might give me the whole dollar. I would get it anyway. You 
see, I'm treasurer of the syndicate.' " 

There should be a law passed to prohibit men who are 

married from commiting crimes which would land them in jail. 
A single man without any parents, sisters, brothers or other sen- 
sitive kin may subject himself to imprisonment and penal dis- 
grace without causing agony to the innocent, but a married man 
has no business to expose himself to a jail penalty. I wonder 
just how the law of the sort I have suggested eould be worded? 
But why worry about that detail? We will have T. R. take it up 
when he returns from "Elba." In the meantime, we must have 
our heart-strings wrung in sympathy for the women whose hus- 
bands get into prison — and it is painful to have to expend so 
much sympathy. 

-So the Berkeley oaks are falling. The heavy north wind 



which blew over Berkeley last week ripped up two of the giant 
guardians of the University of California campus and saddened 
the minds of all students and graduates of the institution. The 
oaks have been considered inviolate. The regents, in their 
dreams, could tear down North Hall and substitute an adequate 
building for the old, honored and beloved library, but they could 
not touch the trees. And now the wind, vandal from the North, 
has downed the object of student reverence. And possibly that 
has inspired some student poet to write a sonnet on the depreda- 
tions of nature. But that last would be too cruel a punishment 
to inflict on loyal California graduates. 

The prisoners at San Qttcntin did not have turkey for 

Christmas. Honest men who did not have turkey will probably 
feel a little touch of relief on that account. But they need not. 
Prison fare, even turkey. 1 should think, must be mixed with the 
e, and the cranberry sauce which a murderer 
might eat must choke him as if it were the blood of his victim 
splashed gor» on his platter. I believe in prison punishment, 
but 1 think that steel liars are the penalty, and that after a man 
is behind them, it is a cheap sentiment that would beg 
him a holiday repast. 




FISH 
J All Sea Foods 

No better or more delicate 
flavor can be added to all 
fish cooking than by using 

LEA&PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

A perfect seasoning for 
Soups, Steaks, Chops, 
Roasts, Gravies and 
Salad Dress i ngs. 

It Aids Digestion. 

John Duncan's Sons, Agts., N. Y. 



Announcement 



The Tozer Co. 



beg to announce that they 
are now permanently loca- 
ted at 228 Grant Ave. Next to 
White House. Second floor. 



Fine Wall Papers, Draperies, and Interior 
Decorating 



Telephone Douglas 1869 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco. bants' 

Exchange Building, calls the attention of the public to their 
Free Labor Bureaus, located at Xo. 170 Turk street. San Fran- 
ind S04 Broadway, Oakland. All classes of male help fur- 
nished absolutely free both to employer and employee. 




Oar new studio » oow complete Let u. 
»how >oo our method of presenting Irrhtiof 



Lighting 
Fixtures 

The Enos Company 

C. t ROESCH. Mnaav 



3M Sana- St Allied Am Mr. 

S*a Fraacac* 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 



Private Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member s Chicago Board of Trade 

(. Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 

Mill« Bld c . 

T«l. Kearny -482 



Branch Ofnca 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Angelas 



Branch Office: Palace Hotel 



JANUARY INVESTMENTS 

6 per cent 1910 send for 



Before converting your S. P. of ARIZ, 
our list of 

BOND OFFERINGS 



SUTRO & CO., 



412 Montgomery Street 



San Francisco 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address, 812-814 
Claua Spreckels Bide. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyrights. Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 

MARLEY & CO. 

116-118 Geary Street 

Makers of Tailored Shirts, Night Gowns and Pajamas. Largest slock 
of imported fabrics on the Coast. 

Phone Douglas 3108, and representative will call. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Joshua Hendy Iron Works. 
The regular annual meeting of the Stockholders of the Joshua Hendy 
Iron Works will be held at the office of the corporation. No. 75 Fremont 
street, San Francisco, California, on TUESDAY, the 11th day of January, 
1910, at the hour of 10 o'clock A. M., for the purpose of electing a Board 
of Directors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meeting. 

CHARLES C. GARDNER, Secretary. 
Dated December 24, 1909. 
t- 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

Security Savings Bank. 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

For the" half year ending December 31, 1909, dividends upon all deposits 

at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum, free of taxes, will be payable 

on and after January 3, 1910. 

FRED W. RAY, Secretary. 

Office — 316 Montgomery Street, San Francisco. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1909. a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all- savings deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Monday, January 3. 1910. Dividends 
not called for are added to apd bear the same rate of interest as the 
principal from January 1, 1910. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL, Cashier. 
Office — 783 Market street, near Fourth. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Savings and Loan Society. 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1909, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Monday. January 3, 1910. Dividends not 
drawn become part of the deposit accounts and earn dividends at tnti 
same rate from January 1st. Money deposited on or before January 10th 
will earn interest from January 1st. 

WM. A. BOSTON. Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street, corner Sutter street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 

San Francisco Savings Union. 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 

For the half year ending December 31, 1909. dividends have been <!•■- 

clared at the rates per annum of four and one-eighth (4 1-8) per cent on 

term deposits and four (4) per cent on ordinary deposits. free of taxes. 

payable on and after Monday, January 3. 1910. A dividend not drawn 

will be added to the deposit account, becomes a part thereof and earns 

dividend from January 1st. Money deposited on or before the loth day 

of January will receive dividend from January 1st. 

R. M. WELCH. Cashier. 
Office — N. W. Cor. California and Montgomery streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
(The German Bank.) 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1909. a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Monday. January 3, 1910. Dividends not 
called for are added to the deposit account and earn dividends from 
January 1. 1910. 

„„ ... ,. ... GEORGE TOURNY. Secretary. 

Office— 526 California Street. Mission Branch — 2572 Mission St near 
22d. Richmond District Branch — 132 Clement St., between Fifth and 
Sixth avenues. 




The New Census. 



Mr. John .1. Deane has been ap- 
pointed as Supervisor of the U. S. 
Census for the Fourth District of 
California. In this connection, it is advised thai the public ac- 
quaint itself with the conditions governing the enumerating of 
our population, and corporations and employers are asked by 
the News Letter to disseminate the information that a penalty 
is attached to a refusal to answer the questions of the enumera- 
tor. Probably the best way to bring this to the mind of the 
businessman, to the end that he may notify those in his family 
and his employ, is to make him thoroughly acquainted with the 
law through these columns. 



At this time, it will be proper to 
Courtesy Must Be state that the enumerator is, also, 

Given and Demanded. to be courteous and polite in his 
dealings with the people he meets, 
and any digression from such action should be reported imme- 
diately to the Supervisor in charge. This is fully set forth in 
the following U. S. Census Act, app. July 2, 1909: 

"Sec. 23 — That it shall be the duty of all persons over twenty- 
one years of age, when requested by the Director of the Census. 
or by any Supervisor, enumerator, or special agent, or other em- 
ployee of the Census Office, acting under the instructions of the 
-aid Director, to answer correctly, to the best of their knowledge, 
all questions on the census schedules applying to themselves and 
to the family to which they belong oi a e related, and to the 
farm or farms of which they or their families are the occupants; 
and any person over twenty-one years of age who, under the con- 
ditions hereinbefore stated, shall willfully give answers that are 

false, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, ami i jonviction 

thereof shall be fined not exceeding one hundred dollars. 

"And it shall be the duty of every owner, proprietor, m&nagi r, 
superintendent or agent of a hotel, apartment house, boarding 
or lodging house, tenement or other building, when requested in 
the Director of the Census, or by any Supervisor, enumerator, 
special agent or other employee of the Census Office, acting un- 
der the instructions of the said director, to furnish the names of 
the occupants of said hotel, apartment house, hoarding or lodg- 
ing house, tenement, or niher building, and to give there to free 
ingress and egress to any duly authorized representative of the 
Census Office, so as to permit of the collection of statistics for 
census purposes, including the proper and correct enumeration 
of all persons having their usual place or abode in said hotel, 
apartment house, boarding or lodging house, tenement, or other 
building, and any owner, proprietor, manager, superintendent or 
agent of a hotel, apartment house, boarding or lodging house, 
tenement or other building who shall refuse Or willfully neglect 
to give sueb information or assistance under the conditions 
hereinbefore slated, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon 
conviction thereof shall be fined not exceeding five hundred dol- 
lars. 

"Sec. 24. — And it shall be the duty of every owner, president, 
treasurer, secretary, director or other officer or agent of any 
manufacturing establishment, mine, quarry or other establish- 
ment of productive industry, whether conducted as a corpora- 
tion, firm, limited liability company, or by private individuals, 
when requested by the Director of the Census or by any Super- 
visor, enumerator, special agent or-olher employ if the Census 

Office acting under the instructions of the said Director, to an- 
swer completely and correctly to the best of his knowledge all 
questions on any census schedule applying to such establishment, 
and any owner, president, secretary, director or other officer or 
agent of any manufacturing establishment, mine, quarry or 
other establishment of productive industry, who under the con- 
ditions hereinbefore stated shall refuse or willfully neglect to 
answer any of these questions, or shall willfull] give answers that 
are false, shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and upon com ii tion 
thereof shall be fined not exceeding ten thousand dollars oi 
imprisoned for a period not exceeding one year, or both so fined 
and imprisoned at the discretion of the court. The provisions 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



of this section shall also apply to the collection of the informa- 
tion required and authorized by the Act entitled "An Act to 
provide for a permanent Census Office," and by Acts amendatory 
thereof or supplemental thereto. 

"Sec. 25. — That the information furnished under the pro- 
visions of the next preceding section shall be used only for the 
statistical purposes for which it is supplied. No publication shall 
be made by the Census Office whereby the data furnished by any 
particular establishment can be identified, nor shall the Director 
of the Census permit any one other than the sworn employees 
of the Census Office to examine the individual reports. 

"Sec. 26. — That all fines and penalties imposed by this Act 
may be enforced by indictment or information in any court of 
competent jurisdiction." 



Do you remember how you used to 
Do You Love the Flag ? feel your gorge rise as you read of 
Columbia ruling the ocean? How 
your eye kindled and how proud you felt when you sang the lines, 
"Columbia, gem of the ocean," etc.? 
It was so once upon a time in the fabled days when grandad 
was young. Since then Subsidy drove it from the seas. Con- 
gress helped, and the people finished the job by their apathy. 



The bank clearings of San Francisco shows this year to be 

the largest in ten in volume. The exception is 1907. The bank 
clearings are an exceedingly conservative index as to business 
done. We must be in a healthy condition. The estimated figures 
for 1909 are close on to two billions of dollars. 



It has been decided to hold the next Bankers' Association 

convention at Eiverside on May 12th, 13th and 14th, of 1910. 
Mr. K. M. Welch, of the San Francisco Savings Union, enter- 
tained the council of the Bankers' Association at a luncheon at 
the Palace Hotel prior to the business of the convention. 



The Baldwin Piano Company has issued a most beauti- 
ful calendar entitled "Memories," and which is a reproduction 
from -an original photograph. A young girl has surrendered 
herself to the spell of music, and with her body slightly tilted 
forward, is playing some tender melody attuned in feeling to the 
twilight hour. The picture is a fine one, and is illustrative of the 
modern art of photography allied to a delightful blending of 
colors. 



The College of Notre Dame al San Jose 1ms just pub- 
lished its regular quarterly magazine, and is must be admitted 
that, from its white and gold cover to its last text page, it is a 
very beautiful and capable production. The contents of this vol- 
ume should interest all friends of this meat institution, 
as the people who have nothing to do with it or who may 1 
interest in its work outside of the fact that all educational in- 
stitutions are a benefit to the world. It is as interesting as any 
magazine published. 



-San Francisco has long been known over the world as 



one of the cities which has produced many photographers who 
are celebrities in the world of art. Recently two of the best- 
known galleries have united in a studio at 116 and 11> 
street, and the studio is known as the Taber-Stanford. The 
patronage is legion, and it is invited to visit the now establish- 
ment and note the improvements made in the means provided 
to cater to the public's demand for the best in photography. 



You probably won't need a very large tombstone to re- 
cord your good deeds. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 
The Italian-American Bank 
For the half year ending December $ist. 1000. a dividend has been declared al the rate 
of four t4> per cent per annum on all deposits free of taxes, payable on and after ' 
January j. toio. Dividends not called for are added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from January i. tqio. Money deposited on or before January to. will 
draw Interest from January i, toto. 

ANDREA SBARBORO. President. A. E. SBARBORO. Cashfjr 

Office — 460 Montgomery street, corner of Sacramento. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

For thesix months ending December ;i. iovm. a dividend has been declared 
per cent per annum on term deposit stock and four *' per cent transient 

accounts. 

WM. CORBIN. Secretary. EDWARD SWEENEY. President. 

Offict— Junction Golden Gate Avenue. Tavlor and Market streats. San Frarr 



NEW ORLEANS-NEW YORK STEAMSHIP LINE 



the line that connects with the 



SUNSET ROUTE 



at New Orleans, and which you may include in 
your rail ticket at no more cost than for an all 
rail route to New York. 



Two sailings weekly between New Orleans and 
New York. 



Elegant accommodations. Suites of Private Bedroom. 
Parlor and Bath; Staterooms, Library, Smoking 
Room, Baths, Promenade Decks, Excellent Cuisine. 



Make our handsome new office, Broadway and 27th Sts., 
New York, your headquarters when East. Our attendants 
will be glad to assist you in any way possible. Have your 
mail addressed in care of the office and you will receive 
same immediately on call. 



RATES— By rail to New Orleans, steamer thence to New 
York, including meals and berth on steamer. 



First Cabin, $77.75; Round Trip $144.40; Second Cabin, 
$65.75. 

Second Class Rail and Steerage, $61.45. 



Write or see agents 



Southern Pacific 

TICKET OFFICES 

Flood Building. Market Street Ferry Depot 

Third and Townsend Sts., Depot 



Broadway and Thirteenth Sts.. Oakland 



20 



San Francisco News Letter 



Janoakt 1, 1910. 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $ 1,300,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, $400,000. Cash Assets, $900,000 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, 'Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobiles, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Acci- 
dents Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton. John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevis. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,462,739 

Total Cash Assets 6,366,877 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 





British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. 


Ltd. 




OF LIVERPOOL. 






..$6,700,000 




BALFOUR, GUTHRIE &. CO., Agents. 




350 


California Street San 


Francisco. 



The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well managed institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K. Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. * Phone Douglas 2283 




Sign of the 
Pacific Mutual of California 



"Men of California" keep the 
premiums paid for your Acci- 
dent Insurance "in Cali- 
fornia" where the investment 
will add to your prosperity. 

The best Accident and Dis- 
ability Contracts ever issued 
in the world are being writ- 
ten by the 

Pacific Mutual of California 

Agency of F. A. STEARNS 

Manager Accident Department, 

501-502 Shreve Building 

Phone Douglas 240 San Francisco 




INSWAM 




Parsons & Atwood, who were appointed ■general agents of the 
Security Life of America's Pacific Coast branch, last May, have 
since established four branch offices and have a large staff of 
agents at work. Up to the first day of this month over three- 
quarters of a million dollars had been written. Their territory 
includes Washington, Oregon and California. 

* * * 

Two decisions which have aroused keen interest among officials 
of mutual benefit associations are those recently handed down by 
the New York Court of Appeals, which holds that an insurance or 
fraternal concern cannot increase the assessments of its members 
unless there is in its certificates a clause specifically providing for 
such increase, or that the holders of such certificates agree to the 

advance. 

* * * 

The increasing importance of life insurance to commercial en- 
terprise is becoming more apparent every day. We frequently 
read of large amounts of insurance being placed on the lives of 
men at the head of big business concerns. This is an indication 
of a general awakening to the important part that intangible as- 
sets play' in the world's business. 

* * * 

W. L. Hathaway will be the next president of the Life Under- 
writers' Association of San Francisco, C. J. Johnston vice-presi- 
dent, Russell Field secretary, and Fred A. Stolp treasurer. The 
election will be held on the last Saturday of January, and will 

be followed by a banquet at the St. Francis. 

* * * 

Billington, Hutchinson & Co. have resigned the general agency 
of the United States Casualty Co., and the company is looking 
for a desirable successor. 

* * * 

Paul M. Nippert has been elected President of the newly or- 
ganized Burglary Insurance Association, and Joy Lichtenstein, 
secretary. The members are pledged to uniform rates and com- 
missions. 

* * * 

The Scranton Fire, of Pennsylvania, and the Pioneer of 
Tacorna, will make application to enter California, and will place 
the California agency with Smith, Dourson & Co., a former sur- 
plus line brokerage firm of .San Francisco. 

* * * 

The San Francisco brokers' tax has been declared unconstitu- 
tional in a test case before a police judge. The case will be car- 
ried to a higher court. 

* * * 

Henry Evans, of the Continental, persists in the declaration 
that the Phenix Fire will .not come under the wing of his com- 
pany. He again asserts that his entire interest in the matter is 
one of friendship only for E. C. Converse, the chief stock- 
holder of the Phenix, and that once the company be wholly free 
from its present entanglements, he will cease all connection with 
it, assured that its future guidance may safely he left with the 
new officials. And then he gobbles the whole business up, as 

everybody thought he would. 

* * * 

George E. Billys & Co., the insurance brokers and average ad- 
justers, have issued a beautiful calendar in blown tones from 
the celebrated painting by Florence Carlyle. A girl, of the col- 
lege type, is sitting at the piano, and with a look "I' merriment on 
her lace, is sending out a rag-time tune. Her felt hat i- Bel 
rakishlv on the side of her head, ami the twinkle in her eye is 
suggestive of all kinds of enjoyment and innocent fun. Her 
lingers are fairly rippling over the piano, and her dimpling cheeks 

suggests watching others in the room cutting up dancing capers. 
. * * * 

The Liverpool & London & Globe Insurance Company is con- 
templating the purchase of the handsome lot immediately adjoin- 
ing on the east its San Francisco office building, with the view of 
erecting on the two pieces of propertv a handsome office building 
that will be a credit both to the company and the city. 



Jandabt 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



The Western Casualty Company is now merged with the 
Pacific Surety Company. Mr. F. B. Lloyd is President, and A. 
P. Redding secretary. This is the largest and most successful 
of the bonding and surety companies doing business on the 
Pacific Coast, and the business, under the able guidance of Mr. 
Lloyd, is constantly on the increase. The company will now en- 
tor larger fields than before, and will not confine its activities to 
the Pacific Coast States. Mr. Lloyd is a young man who has had 
considerable experience in business, and whose past counts many 
successes. It is said that some of the company's uninvested 
assets will be used in a home office building in San Francisco. 

* * * 

It is assumed that there are about 22,000,000 wage workers 
in this country, and while the very nature of our form of Gov- 
ernment seems to preclude the- idea of a national workingmen's 
compensation law, similar to those obtaining in Great Britain, 
Germany, Switzerland, Austria and other European countries, 
yet the great manufacturing States here seem about to inaugu- 
rate legislative programmes this winter which include radical 
changes and drastic amendments to the present laws covering the 
liability of employers and employees. Insurance by the State 
seems Utopian. The companies will have to be intermediaries, 
and the leading underwriters will have to do the analytical and 
constructive work precedent to complying with the new con- 
ditions under compulsory State laws. 

* * * 

Frederick F. Taylor, who for the past ten years has been 
general manager of the Metropolitan Life's Pacific Department, 
will on January 1st be succeeded by George Benjamin Scott. Mr. 
Scott, who is now in San Francisco, has been twenty-seven years 
with the company, ten years as superintendent of agencies. He 
succeeded Mr. Taylor in the Middle "West territory, and they 
were previously close associates in New York. Mr. Taylor will 
be located in New York. He will be banqueted in the Colonial 
room of the Palace by his friends on December 30th. 

* * * 

While the general outlook of business conditions in life insur- 
ance is favorable, especially in view of the improved conditions 
of business in general throughout the country, it is not by any 
means certain that the changes in recent years have been for 
the permanent good of the business. Paternal ism lias crept into 
the laws of a number of States, the effect of which is yet to be 
determined. 

* * # 

One in nine of all who apply for life insurance is rejected ; but 
this by no means represents the proportion of persons of un- 
suitable age who would not now be able to pass a i lii a] exami- 
nation, though at one time they might have 'lour bo. Prior to 
the examination to ho conducted by the examining physician, the 
agent himself has quietly rejected, bv dcvlining to canvass, a 
number of persons whom be knew, would be unable to pass 
examination. 

* * * 

Franc Nixon Coffin has resigned as Superintendent of the 
Pacific Coasi agencies for the Columbian National Life, under 
Manager Julius Blum. 

The Southern California and Arizona Field Men's Associa- 
tion has been organi ed at Los Angeles, with fourteen charter 
members. The Blue Goose will hereafter become an exclusive 
social organization. 

Rolls H. Malpas, of the Automobile Insurance Company of 
America, is spending the winter in South -mia. 

The Los Angeles Fire Underwriters Association has adopted an 
amendment to the by-laws which will permit San Fran 
general agents to write Lo - business. 

Pasadena aplating putting all wires under ground 

within three rears from date. 



The new Kohler & Chase building and recital hall are 

D open to the public on the afternoon of the fin 
of 1910. Xew Year's Day the splendid ten-story edifice 
on O'l tear Grant avenue and Mi '. will 

expect the presence of young and old San Francis 

letween th< '''clock. Dunn - 

time visitors will be invited to make themselves at home, and to 
hrough the building from roof to basement. There will be 
music on every floor and refreshments aplenty. Sir Henr 
man and li i will contribute a continuous program. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St.. San Francisco 



Yosemite Valley 



OPEN ALL WINTER 



A panorama of ethereal winter beauty, 
beyond description. 



WINTER SPORTS— SLEIGHING- SKAT- 
ING-TOBOGGANING, 



Join one of the Winter Excursion Parties. 

Daily train service, and the fine tourist hotel 
at the Park Line and in Yosemite, make it a 
quick, comfortable trip at any time. 

See GEO. F. MILLER, Genl. Agt. 884 and 673 Market St, S, F. 




Santa Fe 



3 trains 
| every day 



Kansas City— Chicago 



AND POINT 
EAST 



EASTERN EXPRESS 

Leave San Francisco 7:15 a.m. Leave Oakland 7:40 a.m. 

OVERLAND EXPRESS 

Leave San Francisco and Oakland 8 p.m. 

CALIFORNIA LIMITED 

Leave San Francisco and Oakland 10:00 p. m. 
Courteous Employes Unlmie Scenery Harvey Meal Service 

Jas. B. Duffy. General Agent 

673 Market St., San Francisco 

T.LOVE.T.A..|Hrkel St. Ferrj Depots, r. J.J WARMER. G.A..H12BrMdwij.OikUiKl 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 




rnowmii 



-^smi- 






From present appearance it will be but a short time when 
the aeroplane machines will have established agencies all over the 
world, and we may expect that Van Ness avenue will have its 
row of "aviaries," from which will emerge ;ill kinds of wonderful 
winged thing;. The automobile makers will most probably de- 
vote more and more of their time to the Hying machines, and 
nearly even 7 make will be represented. With the New Year 
comes the news of all kinds of triumphs in aviation. Prom 
France comes the story of a man who goes regularly to his lunch 
in an auto-aviation machine, and who thinks it nothing to keep 
his hunting and business engagement with his heavier than air 
car. From Massachusetts comes the news oi the achievements of 
one Walter Tillinghast, and they pale into insignificance the 
famous ride of the celebrated and long-time-dead Peter Rugg. 
Down in Santa Clara County in California some genius is 
working on an aeroplane that will make sixty miles an hour with 
ease, and another individual scarcely out of his teens proposes 
to revolutionize the systems of propulsion by the means of pro- 
peller, and substitute therefor the undulating plane, it i- - ml 
that a car has been made that will skim along at thirty miles an 
hour with ease. 

* * * 

Los Angeles Aviation RJiow. 

Los Angeles leads in aviation enterprise, for she has secured 
the greatest aggregation of heavier than air machines that has 
ever been gathered together at any one place, not excepting 
France. Dick Ferris, the general manager of the aviation meet, 
reports prizes aggregating $80,000. There will be fifty-eight 
"vessels" competing. The following is the list: 

Aeroplanes — Glenn H. Curtiss, address Hammondsport, entry, 
biplane; Louis Paulhan. Paris, Farman biplane; M. Maisson, 
Paris, Farman biplane; M. Miscarol, Paris, Bleriot monoplane; 
Baroness De La Roche, Paris, Bleriot monoplane; Aero Navi- 
gation Co. of America, Girard, aeroplane: Clifford Harmon, 
N~ew York, Curtiss biplane; C. K. Hamilton, Mammondsport, 
Curtiss biplane; H. P. Warner, Beloit, Wisconsin, Curtiss bi- 
plane; Roe Knabenshue, Toledo, O., aeroplane; H. L. Tining, 
Los Angeles, Ornithopter ; J. C. Klassen, Los Angeles, gyro- 
plane; J. C. Klassen, Los Angeles, monoplane; William Ste- 
phens, Los Angeles, monoplane: A. L. Smith. Los Angeles, bi- 
plane; A. J. Gonzales, Los Angeles, bowplane; J. S. Zerhe, Los 
Angeles, multiplane: H. L. Heimer. Los Angeles, ornithopter; 
E. S. Smith, Tropieo.. Cal., monoplane; Pacific Aero Club, San 

Francisco, biplane; Pacific Aero Club, San Francisco, ao- 

plane; Grant Fowler, Tucson. A. T.. triplane; Charles Morok, 
New York, monoplane; Louis Bergdoll, Philadelphia, Pa., Bler- 
iot monoplane; Ralph Sannier, New York, monoplane; Donald 



A Gentleman's Razor 



the very finest ever imported 



Finished on a Stone no larger than a ten cent piece 




Ulis the perfection of ^the Razor Maker's Art— Price S4.0O each 
Manufactured forfand Imported by 

Palace Hardware Company 

581 Market Street, San Francisco 



VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

is the 

Musical Instrument For Everybody 

Victors - $10 to $60 Victrolas - $125 to $200 

Easy Terms 

Sherman Bay & Go. 

Steinway and Other Pianos. 

Player Pianos ot All Grades Victor Talking; Machines 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO 

FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS. OAKLAND 



II. Gordon. Bostonia, aeroplane: J. W. Curzon, Cincinnati, Far- 
man biplane: Goodwin & Cohelan, San Francisco, monoplane; 
San I'iego Aeroplane Manufacturing • '".. monoplane; A. M. 
Williams, Douglas, A. 'J 1 ., monoplane; La Bait Brothers, Yuma, 
A. T.. ornithopter; James A. Iiston, San Diego, monoplane; S. 



For 20 years the KELLY- 
SPRINGFIELD TIRE has 
had the reputation of 
being the best carriage 
tire on the market 

We are now manufactur- 
ing an AUTOMOBILE 
TIRE known as the 

KELLY- 
SPRINGFIELD 

Every tire guaranteed. 




The 

Consolidated 
Rubber Tire 

Company 

507 Howard Street 
San Francisco. 

Pacific CoaSt Manager 
CHAS. W. FLINT 



1 ■■ . I 1RY 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



Y. Beach, New York, monoplane; II. \V. Gale, New York, aero- 
plane; B. F. Roehig, San Diego, monoplane; G. H. Loose, San 
Francisco, monoplane; W. I). Waterman, San Biego, biplane; B. 
J. Campbell, Los Angeles, biplane ; W. J. Davis, Los Angeles, 
double biplane; D. J. Johnson, Los Angeles, aerofoil; R. C. V. 
Mvton, Los Angeles, biplane; Charles Seoghind, Los Angeles, 
monoplane; Charles F. Willard, New York, Curtiss biplane. 

* * * 

Ford Captures Hill Climb. 

Word has been received by the Standard Motor Car Company, 
to the effect that the 20 h. p. Ford touring car, driven by J. J. 
Berthoff, captured the small car event in the hill climbing con- 
ies!, held at Fort Lee, New York, last week. According to re- 
ports, the little car made seven-tenths of a mile of steep, winding 
roads close to the mile-a-minnte mark, making an easy winning 
over the field of light car competitors. 

After recommending that the invitation of Oklahoma City for 
the next convention be accepted by the board of directors, and 
adopting resolutions urging the use of both convicts and enlisted 
men of the army in the construction of good roads, the tenth 
annual convention of the National Good Roads Association 
ended recently. The resolutions adopted urge the building by 
the national Government of highways from Washington to the 
various State capitals, the building of a military road between 
Fort Leavenworth and Fort Riley, Kas., and State laws provid- 
ing that all moneys collected by States from the "license of elec- 
tric, gasoline and steam driven pleasure and commercial vehicles 
be set aside for the improvement of State highways." 

Among the recent deliveries of Buicks by the Howard Auto- 
mobile Company is a forty roadster to Joseph Rose, for the past 
year connected with the Los Angeles branch of the Howard Au- 
tomobile Company, but now of Warm Springs. Rose is an au- 
tomobile man. of wide experience and information, and was 
guided in his own purchase by the high regard in which he holds 
the Buick products, and his knowledge gained from his intimate 
association with these cars, of their superior qualities and great 
durability. 

The San Francisco Motor Club has been incorporated. This 
step was taken on the recommendation of President Owens, be- 
fore whom are many matters demanding the attention of the 
club, and which could not legally be taken up by a body of men 
not incorporated. The incorporation will greatly simplify mat- 
ters. 

At the beginning of the 1910 season, the H. H. Franklin 
Manufacturing Company, makers of the Franklin air-cooled 
motor car, announced that the new models, light of weight and 
equipped with large tires, would average 2,500 miles without a 
puncture. Reports received show an average even greater than 
this. 

* * * 

The 1910 Apperson Demonstrator having arrived, those who 
have been waiting for this great modem car may have the pleas- 
ure of looking it over at the Auto Livery Company, who are the 
agents. The offices of this company are located at 605 Van 
Ness avenue. 




Get a Demonstration in 
The 1910 



APPERSON 

Car 



Auto Livery Company 

Agents 

605 Van Ness Avenue Phone, Franklin 1535 



Fourteen out of fifteen automobiles in I 

Does this thing to i/ouf 

Motor S Oakland. 



TAXICABS 

RENAULT CARS 

Telephone: Private Exchange connecting all stands 

FRANKLIN 

4848 

SILENT. SPEEDY, SAFE SERVICE 



Pacific Taximeter Cab 
Company 

1355-1363 Bush Street at Polk 



FAT C BEAL, General Manager 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januaby 1, 1910. 



The Charm of the Six 



"I tell you it makes a fellow's blood tingle to look at a car like mine, and feel that it belongs to 
him; a car that will start on the direct drive; a car that will race a railroad train or jog con- 
tentedly behind a milk cart; a car that can make a steep hill ashamed of itself; a wild, dashing 
car that eats up the miles; a faithful sweet-running car that purrs like a pussy cat. To own 
such a car is to own a kingdom; the driver's seat is a throne, the steering-wheel a scepter, 
miles are your minions and distance your slave. " From ' 'A Six Cylinder Courtship, " pub- 
lished by The John McBride Co. 



The warmest praise of the six-cylinder 
car necessarily fails to describe the car's 
chiefest virtue — its charm. For charm is 
an indescribable quality, and, like the odor 
of exquisite perfume, can never be known 
until it is personally experienced. 

Charm is that harmonious excellence 
which wins without argument. 

To the car owner who feels its influence 
it has a value beyond price, and he would 
not barter that car for any other car in 
the wide, wide world. 



Charm is progressive. Originally we 
were charmed by the automobile generally, 
or rather by the sensation of traveling 
in a vehicle that propelled itself. 

But as our experience broadens, and we 
come to realize that ears differ, ami that 
our first car has. after all. a List of im- 
perfections, this first charm gives place to 
the charm of some other car which no! 
only propels itself, as did the first, bul 
does so in a manner infinitely better. 

Thus from car to car, model to model, 
year to year, the old charm goes, and a 
new charm takes its place. 

Since the automobile is Bimply a ma- 
chine that undergoes annual improvement 
it would seem possible to improve it less 



and less each succeeding year — thus an- 
nually lessening the degree of fresh charm 
to be experienced by the car user. 

Fortunately, however, this is not al- 
ways the condition. Indeed, the most re- 
cent improvement supplies charm in 
quantity and quality beyond the most 
sanguine expectations. 

For, in improving the automobile 
four to SIX cylinders, motor car design- 
ers removed once for all (and for the 
first time since the motor car took its 
place in business and social life) ihe fun- 
damental fault of a broken power stream. 

Thus the Six. alone of all motor ears, 
i< distinguished by a continuous, un- 
broken stream of power, which, being fun- 
damentally different, produces fundamen- 
tally different results than were ever be- 
fore possible. 

* * * 

Notably, a remarkably sweet-running 
and quiet motor, so powerful that at slow 
speed never before available, it propels il ^ 
car. 

This ability I" drive at slower motor 
' han ever before, » idens I lie rangi 
of dri\ iiiLi speeds : so much so, ind< ed, 
i eii hills hitherto requiring Erst or 31 1 - 
ond gear, may now be taken on a 
drwe. 



Furthermore, this same new continu- 
ous power stream that gives sweetness, 
quietness, flexibility and hill-climbing 
capacity, also eliminates vibration and 
lessens the hammer-blow of the piston to 
such an extent that the Six must neces- 
sarily outlive any earlier type of ear — 
two years to one. 



All of which seems too good to be true. 
Nevertheless,, it IS true, and the truth of 
it accounts for the. charm of the Six — a 
charm so strong that Six owners cannot 
speak of their ears in praise less strong 
than the superlative degree. 



But it is futile to talk of charm and 

hope to be underst I. The only way for 

you to realize it for yourself is to ride in 
the Winton Six yourself. 

Then you « ill be under the same in- 
ability to express its charm to your 

- .1- we are in trying to express il 
to you. 

Von can see the 1910 Winton Six at 
our branch house, or we will show it at 
vour home or office. 




The Winton Motor 
Carriage Co. 

300 Van Ness Ave. San Francisco, Cal. 

'Phone Market 1672 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



LJd&lan 




Scientific simplification characterizes the 
OAKLAND throughout. It has fewer 
■working parts than any other motor car, 
and is a masterly example of what unit 
construction means to the automobile 
world. 

It will out perform, out-wear, out-do in 
every way any car of its price and horse- 
power and most cars of vastly higher price 
and rating. 



COME IN AND LET US DEMONSTRATE 
IT TO YOU. 



S. G. Chapman 



Telephone Park 6475. 



324 Van Ness Ave. 



Sometime, somewhere, someone MAY 
make an automobile the equal of the 

Buick 



But never will any-one, any-where, any- 
time produce a better one. 

The BUICK holds more worlds records than 
any other car on earth, regardless of price- 
Consider BUICK Quality, then look at BUICK 
price. 



Buick "White Streak" - $1150 

Bulck-30 .... 1550 

Bulck-40 .... 1900 

Bulck-50 7 passenger - 2900 
All F. O. B. S. F. 



Get immediate deliveries now while you can. 



Howard Automobile Co. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 



523-533 Golden Gate Ave. 



Phones: Market 1536 
Home J 2313 



The Winter's Sensation 




This Morgan & Wright Tire 
WILL NOT SKID 

Weinslock, Nichols Co. 

569 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



BRIGHTEN UP FOR THE 



• • •• 

• • •• 



HOLIDAYS 



•• •• 



If you are particular about 
the appearance of your 
car at this time of the year, 
—and you should be— see 
us about painting it. Our 
ideas and suggestions in 
painting an automobile are 
vastly different from those 
of others. 



:: Elite Auto Company :: 



\L MORRIS 



677 Golden Gate Ave. 



36 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 



Among the prominent purchasers of the new Diamond Grip 
Tire last week was Mrs. Porter, wife of the prominent Associated 
Oil man, who had the rear wheels of her limousine equipped 
with 36x5 grip casings. 



Ivan L. de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



Golden Gate Ave. and Van Ness, San Francisco 



Pioneer Automobile 
Company 




$900 f. o. b. Factory 



Over 100 of these cars sold in this territory since Aug. 1, 
1909. Why not? This is the largest small car on the mar- 
ket. Large in up-to-date mechanical ideas and capabilities, 
small in size and Price. 



724-730 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



San Francisco 



Chalmers-Detroit Coast Representative to Visit Eastern Auto- 
mobile Shows. 

The Chalmers-Detroit Motor Company of Detroit, Michigan, 
have just wired their Pacific Coast representative, YV. C. Hood, 
to make arrangements to visit all the Eastern automobile shows, 
and are sending Mr. Jean Bemb (winner of the Detroit trophy 
in the Glidden tour) to look alter their interests on the coast 
during the absence of Mr. Hood. 

Mr. Hood will visit New York, Philadelphia. Washington, 
Boston, Buffalo, Detroit, Chicago, St. Louis and Kansas City, 
I will return to the coast about April 1st. 

"In visiting the different automobile shows," says Hugh Chal- 
mers, President of the Chalmers-Detroit Motor Company, "it 
gives us an opportunity of getting all of our road men together 
to talk over all minor improvements of our cars. It also famil- 
iarizes them with the construction and operation of other ear-. 
and by doing this, it places them in a position to give Chalmers- 
Detroit owners the maximum use of their cars at the minimum 
cost of operation. 

* * * 

Harry H. Scott, treasurer of the Pacific Manifold Company, 
is one of the most ardent Hudson enthusiasts in the field. His 
firm has been equipping its country salesmen with Hudson run- 
abouts, to cover both the regular valley and mountain territory. 
These machines are proving most successful and economical in 
their work. 

One of the first trips taken was through the Southern Mines 
District, and any man who has been over that territory back of 
Stockton and around Tuolumne ami Sonora knows that there is 
no more severe country to travel the whole State over. 

Mr. Snelling, who took this car out, bad never driven an 
automobile up to two days before he made the trip, and he ac- 
complished it with an absolutely perfect score, covering 1350 
miles with the greatest ease and without even a puncture. The 
only time he had to lift the hood of the engine was to oil the 
car. This speaks volumes for the durability of the car, as well 
as the precision with which tin- designers have figured out' the 
tire equipment, and Mr. Snelling now says he would not take 
twice the price paid for his car. if he had to cover his territory 
without it. 

The Pioneer Automobile Company reports a great deal of 
active inquiry from various jobbing houses who are outfitting 
their country salesmen with Hudson cars. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company reports the sale and deliv- 
ery through S. M. Phillips, its agent al Sacramento, of a Hudson 
car to D. M. Combs of Sacramento, the delivery of a Chalmers- 
Detroit seven-passenger to I'. C. Drescher, of Mebius & Dres- 
iher Company, and a Chalmers-Detroit "Thirty" five-passenger 
touring car to Dr. E. H. Buffum of Fair Oaks, Sacramento 

County. 

* * * 

Mr. Chesbro Smith has written The Diamond lluliher Com- 
pany that two of the new Diamond Grip type of tires covered 
4865 miles on the rear wheels of his car before ever being re- 
moved. Most of this running, he writes, was through the bad- 
lands of North Dakota, the worst roads imaginable; mostly roeks 
and rough going, but the grip tires were always on the job. 



RENAULT 



"The Car" Guranteed For Life 






NEW PRICES FOR 


1910 








Closed Cars 


Tour 


tie or Runabouts 






complete 




complete 


Voiturette 








$1750 


9 H. P. 




$3000 




2500 


10 H. P. 4 cyl. 




3500 




3000 


12-16 H. P. 




4000 




3200 


14-20 H. P. 




5500 




4500 


18-24 H. P. 6 cyl. 


"Little S 


ix" 6250 




5250 


20-30 H. P. 4 cyl. 




6500 




5500 


25-35 H. P. 4 cyl. 




6800 




5800 


35-45 H. P. 4 cyl. 




7500 




6500 


50-60 H. P. 6 cyl. 


"Big Six' 


8500 




7500 



ALL CARS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR AMERICAN ROADS. 

RENAULT "30" Special With Toy Tonncau. J5750. 

RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 

316-322 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. Telephone, Market 7038 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



The new Buick model officially designated as Model "19" and 
popularly known as the "Buick 30," is the center of interest now- 
adays at the salesrooms of the Howard Automobile Company. 
This is the little ear the arrival of which has been anxiously 
awaited by many people both in and out of town, and many are 
coming in daily from the surrounding territory for the express 
purpose of seeing this new Buick creation, about which so much 
has been said and of which so much is expected. The new model 
is the same design mechanically as the Buick White Streak and 
the "Forty," and fills in the gap between these two already popu- 
lar machines. The cylinders are- 4^x4%, cast in pairs, and de- 
veloping thirty horsepower. It has three speed selective type 
ttansmission and a wheel base of 105 inches. 

* * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company report the sale of a seven- 
passenger Chalmers-Detroit "Forty," and a Hudson runabout, to 
Mr. W. L. Growall of this city. Mr. Growall is a recent con- 
vert to motor cars, his first being a Chalmers "Thirty," purchased 
last season. Both Mr. and Mrs. Growall drove their car last 
season, and without chauffeur the trip was made to Los Angeles. 
The new touring car will be used for touring between their 
country place and the city during the summer season. The 
Hudson runabout will be used for a station wagon. Delivery 
will be made about the first of the year. 

Another shipment of the new 1910 Ford cars was received 
this week by the Standard Motor Car Company. Included in 
the allotment is one of the Town Cars, which is being made a 
feature of the Ford factory this season. This is the second ship- 
ment of town cars that the Standard Motor Car Company has 
received, and according to reports of W. L. Hughson, the demand 
for this class of car will result in a great many of them being 
brought out to San Francisco within the next year. 

The Lovell McConnell Manufacturing Co., makers of the 
Klaxon and automobile accessories, have outgrown their present 
factory, and have purchased ten lots on Wright and two lots on 
Emmet street, Newark, N. J., and are building a new plant. The 
machine shop is 200x50, two stories and basement, and the foun- 
dry 75x40. There will also be the power plant building, a fire- 
proof building for storing excelsior and a private garage. 

* * * 

Mr. S. F. Weaver is a strong advocate of the new Diamond 
Grip Tires. He states in his letter that he is still running on 
the original four which equipped his car, and which has covered 
to date over 5,000 miles, the two front tires never even so much 
as suffering a puncture during that mileage. 

* * * 

F. D. Wood, of Cement, who recently purchased a Chalmers- 
Detroit thirty-horsepower car, and received delivery of same in 
Philadelphia, has written the Pioneer Automobile Company that 
he is about to return to the Coast, and has made arrangi 
for his car to be shipped to this city. 

■t * * 

The Pioneer Automobile Company recently delivered to Philip 
Clay one of the large seven-passenger Thomas touring cars. This 
car has some special features, particularly that of the color, 
whieli was the selection of Mrs. Clay, and which make 
attractive. 

* * * 

W. C. Hood, Coast Representative of the Chalmers-Detroit 
Motor Company, has just returned to San Francisco after an 
extended southern trip covering Los ! liiver- 

side. Pasadena and Bedlands. 

» » * 

Mr. W. L. Hughson. President of the Standard Motor Car 
iany, has left for New York to attend the automobile show 
ami the annual meeting of the United Manufacturers A 
Hon, of which he is the Western representative. Mr. Hughs 
will be present at both the Licensed and On-licensed shows, and 
may \isit the Ford and Velie factories on bis visit East. The 
well-known, automobile man. of this city, will probably be away 
for several weeks. 

* • * 

Stays With tfts Old Finv. 

Mr. Cowan, who has been with Hughson X - Merton C 
several years, and who recently received an attractive offer from 
the Stewart Speedometer Company, has decided to remain in his 
present position with Hughson & Merton. 



OIL IS CHEAPER THAN FRICTION" 




EASTERN /-V I I 

AUTOMOBILE UIL 

EFFICIENT NON-CARBONIZING ECONOMICAL 



Ash your garage. California Compounding Company, San 
Jose, Pacific Coast Distributors. 



WE MAKE A SPECIALTY OF REPAIRING AUTO 
LAMPS, RADIATORS AND FENDERS AT SHORT 
NOTICE. Phone Market 751 




METAL SPINNING IN ALL ITS BRANCHES 



MAYERLES GERMAN EYEWATER IS 

a simple and perfectly harmless Eye Remedy, for children and 
adults. 

OFFICE CHIEF OF POLICE. San Francisco —It gires me (real pleas- 
ure to r eci. in me ii -1 to the public Mr. George May or In of 880 Market St.. 
San Francisco. 1 have been using glasses for the paat twelve year* 
and during that time have consulted several opticians, but not until I 
had consulted Mr Qoorge Mayerle and had him ftl glasses to my eyes 
did 1 get entire satisfaction. Most respectfully. 

J. H. ANDERSON. Sergeant of Police. 
IT IS MARVELOUS The effect of Mayerle's Eye Water has been 
marvelous and 1 shall recommend it as the peer of all eye remedies. 
Your* truly. T. KELLY. Alameda Conoty Hospital . San Leandre. Cal. 
Cit?OT*£?tP }Vf fl Vr?r*lP l - ,r ' dumt ' Oeru>an Expert Optician, charter member American 
® OyC Association of Opticians B«0 Market Street, opposite Hale's 

Phone Franklin 3378. San Francisco. MAYERLE'S OKRMAN EYE WATER, By Mall. i:.e 




White Diamond Water Co. 



Incorponted 



Pure Wntr lor llikl.nd 
Alimedi 
Berkeley 



An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacterlologlcally purified by electrical process 5 rations 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. $1.60 per month. Single 6 (rallon 
bottle, 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 41(2. 
980 45tb Street Oaklind. Cal. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



14O0 to 1460 Fourth St.. San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 

Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Succeeding A. ZeOerbaca & Sons 
Zellerbach Building. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streets 




PEPSIN 

GUM 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 

Supplies Machinist 



Storage Renting 



MOTOR CAR SERVICE CO. 1.^ MoWr Car 



J. W. PEARSON. General Minster 
Market and Van Ness 



Station in the World.' 



Phone Market 1705 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Roaenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Neat and Golden Qate. Phono Franklin 1535 



Golden Gate School of 
Automobile Ennineerinjr 


A. GILCREST 


Automobile 
Cleariof Houit 


419425 Lirkio Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 




San Irincisco. Cil 




1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 

S. G. RAYL 

Northern California Representative 

583-591 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. 



Durocar 



"Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar Automobile Company 



of San Francisco 



88 Van Ness Avenue 



Tire Cost is Lessened 

THE KEATON VULCANIZING WORKS 
616-618 Van Ness Avenue 

issue a new 
GUARANTEE ON RETREADS 

which should interest all owners. This guarantee is pracftically 
the same as that governing new tires and is mos\ liberal in its 
terms. It will pay you to investigate this practical form of tire 
insurance. 

The Keaton Vulcanizing Works 
616-618 Van Ness Ave. 

REMEMBER THE NAME AND THE PLACE 



SPLITDORF MAGNETO 

Recognized Everywhere as the 

Leading Magneto 

Ask any user. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch, 520 Van Ness Ave. 



Thomas B. Jeffery 4 Company, 117-128 Valencia St., San Franoiaco 



A New Car on, the Coast. 

Then the demand became more insistent. An even lower- 
priced car was desired. Harrison again went East.. This time 
he sought out C. Everitt, one of the makers of the Everitt Metz- 
gers, Flanders car, the popular E. M. P. As a result, he closed 
with Everitt for the Everitt line of cars in the West. 

The Everitt is unknown this side of the Rocky Mountains. Be- 
fore taking the agency, Harrison subjected the car to a grueling 
test, which sent it for hundreds of miles over the worst highways 
that could be found. The sturdy little car withstood the test, 
and Harrison was satisfied. 

The first of the Everitt cars is to arrive in San Francisco about 
the first of the year. The car has a wheel base of 116 inches, a 
roomy tonneau, and is particularly easy riding. It is handsome 
and stylish in appearance and sells for $1350. 

With three lines of cars, the Peerless, selling for prices which 
range from $4500 to $6500; the Seldcn, ranging from $2150 
to $3150 ; and the Everitt. at $1350, the Western agent seems 
lo be well supplied. Harrison has become one of the most 

prominent automobile agents on the Pacific Coast. 

* * * 

A Good Year Predicted. 

Because the public demanded a low-priced motor car, the 
manufacturers turned out a machine that is within the reach of 
the masses, says H. O. Harrison. The price of automobiles, lie 
continues, has reached the low mark on the guage, as it will be 
impossible to turn out high-grade material for less money. This 
means, says Harrison, that the coming year is to be the best in 
which to buy a motor car. The present offers more choice than 
has ever before been given, says the agent for Peerless, Selden 
and Everitt ears. 

With his show-rooms empty, because he couldn't supply the de- 
mand, and the demand just as strong, Harrison went East and 
spent some time at the beautiful home of George B. Selden, 
father of the automobile at Rochester, N. Y. As a result of that 
visit, Harrison returned to the West with the Selden line of 
cars. These are handsome and ornate, and are in the medium- 
priced class. 

* * * 

An Eastern gentleman, visiting in this city, expresses himself 
as being very much surprised to find so few closed automobiles, 
and especially those of the inside drive type. "Possibly it is a 
compliment to the climate," said he, "but I notice in New York 
and Chicago a great many physicians and a great many ladies 
driving what is known as 'tie inside drive '30' coupe,' which is 
manufactured by the Chalmers-Detroit Company. This car is 
thirty horsepower, and is their regular roadster with a rumble 
seat. The coupe is simply a shell that fits down over the stand- 
ard runabout after the roadster seat has been removed, and the 
shell can be taken off and the seat put back on the roadster, mak- 
ing a runabout for good weather. I believe if this style of car 
is ever introduced in San Francisco it will be most popular, es- 
pecially for physicians." 

* * * 

A six-year-old automobile that seldom takes another car's dust 
when it comes to impromptu hill-climbing contests is owned by 
William A. Allen, of Port Chester, N. Y. The motor car is an 
air-cooled Franklin runabout of the "vintage of '04," as Mr. 
Allen describes it. Not long ago he had a contest with a 1909 
car of another make on a flat and hard stretch of road near 
Port Chester. 

"Now, I have several cars," he said, afterward, in describing 
the incident. "Tn fact, have been driving ever since they came 
out, back in the time of the one-lunger and before, even in the 
time of the steamer, but have driven a little Franklin runabout 
of the vintage of '04, and what is more, have been driving her 
day in and day out, winter and summer, in zero and blood heat, 
ever since. I will not confess to being one of the speed maniacs, 

but I do like to trim some of the knowing ones." 

* * * 

Another new 1910 model of Oldsmobile has just reached the 
salesrooms of the Howard Automobile Company. This time it 
is the "Olds Special," with a close-coupled body, a car of beauti- 
ful lines that is enjoying the keen admiration of all the auto 
fanciers. This new model Olds is a 40 horse-power with four 
speed selective transmission, US inch wheel base and 36 inch 
wheels. All the fine points and details are taken care of in 
distinctively Olds fashion, which means unsurpassed elegance 
and refinement. 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



29 




-When she says the clock's correct 
She is neutral, we suspect. 

When she says the clock is fast 
You are making time at last. 

When she says the clock is slow 
You are done for. Better go. 



-Pittsburg Post. 



'Sir, 



I have no home," began the seedy-looking man, 
"and — ' "No taxes to pay, no rent, no coal bills, no worry 
over the rise in milk prices ! Permit me to congratulate you." 

"I have no job, and " "Lucky chap ! No danger of being 

fired." "But I am serious. I have no money and " "No 

temptation to spend it foolishly on able-bodied beggars. Why, 
you're a veritable child of fortune. Good-day." — Philadelphia 
Ledger. 

Dejected Youth — I would like to return this engagement 

ring I purchased hero a few days ago. Jeweler — Didn't it suit 
the young woman. Dejected Youth — Yes, but another young 
man had already given her one just like it, and I would like to 
exchange it for a wedding present. — Tit-Bits. 

The King of Prance marched up the hill with 40,000 

men. "I wished plenty of witnesses," he explained. His pur- 
pose accomplished, he forthwith marched down. — New York Sun. 

Men say that every time we kiss 

And hug, depend upon it. 
We're going to ask our husbands lor 
Another gown or bonnet. 

Now husbands play the self-same game; 

When we are much caressed, 
It is a certain sign that they 
Would like their trousers pressed. 

— Detroit Free Press. 

Gladys — A girl begins to hang up her mistletoe as soon as 

she gets too old to hang up her slocking. De Garry — I've noticed 
thai some girls never get too old to hang up the mistletoe. — 
Judge. 

"Who is the blindfolded party with the pair of scales?" 

asked the stranger ai the art gallery. "That represents Justice." 
"Oh, I thought it ra a sugar weigher." — Washington Star. 

— —"Why don't the common people get more?" "Because 
they don't ovist as a body. Every individual thinks he is slightly 
superior (o the general run of humanity." — Pittsburg Post. 

"A chap told mo this morning thai I looked the image 

of you." "Where is the idiot? I'll pound the life out of him." 
"Too late— I killed him." Nw ) Of* Times. 

"The world owes every man a living."' "If that's true. 

the world's been letting my account run a disgracefully long 
time." Oh r, ,,„,/ lj%ad.tr. 

"He's married and got three children and next July " 

"He's going to celebrate the fourth. 1 suppose." — Young's Mag- 

mw, 

Phyllis — But. my dear, it is a set rel : I _'ave my word not 

to tell a soul. Afvrtilla — Yes, -. I'm listening. — Brooklyn 

Life. 



If you are good for the price, the doctor doesn't hesitate 

to pronounce it appendii 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros., 246 W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Damf 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. Road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and) 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 



SAN JOSE — Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1st and St. James Sts. 
Main 38. The San Jose home of the "Mitchell Family." 



Tel 



SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE— San Jose' Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgrs. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers -Detroit, 
Thomas, Buick and Olds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies In connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner In California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROT, CAL. — George E. Tlce, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVTXLE.— J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

HEALDSBURG— HOTEL SOTOYOME, J. McDonough. Prop. Only first 
class hotel in the city. Electricity throughout. Free sample rooms. Hot 
and cold water in every room. Baths with suites. Special attention to 
auto parties. Phone Main 50. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
271 Valencia •treat, San Franclaco. Telephons Market 1»8fl 



THORPE'S 

ILLUSTRATED 

ROAD MAPS TOUR BOOK 

The only Map which shows actual 
PHOTOS of I'orks.TurnsiCross Roads 



TMOR.PE ENGRAVING CO L A 



PACIFIC 

MOTOR SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

Oakland, Calif. 
Northern Distributors 



IGNITION 

TROUBJ.ES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and Inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
545 Van Neaa Ave. Phone Market 6878 



Vulcanizing 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phons Market 6*70. 



42 Van Nee* Avenue. 



6a n Fra nefsco, Ca I . 



Phone Park 6544 



L. J. Carl. Manag-er 



Auto Top Manufacturing Co. 

Automobile and Carriage Trimmings 



491 Golden Gate Avenue 



San Francisco. Cat. 



Near Polk 



H^HH 5000 

''means that ever; AJ AX TIRE a guaranteed for 5000 miles or 200 
dajVJservice. Write (or a copy oftthe'Guarantee. 

OAX-GMES RUBBER CO.. Broadway 4 57lh Si . Raw Vort Saa Fraararo Braarh I 

Factories: Treatoo N J.. Braarfcea aao Afraot* ia 12 orw* 544 Vn Neaa Are. 



Th 



ervnox 



3 



Brake 
Lining 



Hughson An d Merton 



WILL NOT BURN— LAST * INDEFINITELY 
FACTORY 
R PRESENT ATTvTS 



544 Van Neaa Ave. 
San Franclaco 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 1, 1910. 




SUDDEN CHANGES FROM DRY TO WET, OR HOT 
TO COLD, PLAY HAVOC WITH OUR HEALTH AND 
COMFORT. A PURE NUTRITIOUS AND INVIGORAT- 
ING STIMULANT SUCH AS 



HUNTER 
WHISKEY 



IS RECOMMENDED AT SUCH TIMES 

BECAUSE OF ITS HIGH QUALITY AND 

ABSOLUTE PURITY 



HENRY CAMPB & CO., INC., 

Distributors for California and Nevada, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



.Do You Want Health?- 



Take a Course of Baths at 
PASO ROBLES HOT SPRINGS 

The curative hot sulphur and mud baths, the warm dry air and 
the bright sunshine. all combine for the restoring of health. Then, 
add the comforts of a modern hotel — good baths, good thing's to 
eat, SERVICE. Low round trip railroad rates. Summer rates 
sl-ill in effect.. Write for details to 

F. W. SAWYER, Director, 
Paso Robles Hot Springs, Paso Robles, CaL 

** Anyone can get well here"— Admiral Robley D. Evans. 



A Pair of Japanese Spaniels 



TOY SPANIELS OF JAPAN 
MALE AND FEMALE- 
OWNER IS TRAVELING AND 
CANNOT KEEP THEM- 
MUST SELL. 

Enquire Box A, Care San Francisco News Letter, 773 Market Street, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS 

Goodyear Rubber Co. 

R. H. PEASE, President 

587-589-591 Market Street, at Second 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



©£ W®nMift 

If Bowman, the assistant bookkeeper, had a heart he was as 
unconscious of it as he was of any other of the practical working 
organs that went to make up his physical man. 

Bowman loved his big ledgers. He reveled in long, terrifying 
columns of figures. He liked good things to eat in an unemo- 
tional way, which left him unmoved if the steak happened to be 
done too much or too little. He was devoted to his mother. He 
enjoyed his pipe in the evening after dinner. However, up to 
the age of 28 he apparently had never heeded or been disturbed 
by the swish of a petticoat, nor had let his head be turned even 
llic fraction of an inch by the glance of a bright eye. 

He wasn't afraid of girls : in fact, he rather liked them. They 
were pretty, he thought, on account of the bright colors they 
wore, ami some of lliojn were sratvl'iil, so he enjoyed seeing them 
flash about, but somehow they all looked very much alike to him, 
and lie regarded them all with a benevolent indifference. He 
was quite an ordinary, stout, plain person, who wore big spec- 
tacles across his big nose, bad a wide, kind face and a twinkle in 
his eye. 

Bowman was probably the only member of the office force who 
remained unmoved the morning Miss Finley made her first ap- 
pearance. Quiet and small and dainty as she was, she was yet 
such a vivid creature that even the manager, who believed that 
business and social relations should be kept distinctly separate. 
noted her and asked her name. However, the first time Bowman 
remembered seeing her was one morning, several weeks after 
her initial appearance, when he raised his eyes from his work 
to find her standing at his elbow, looking just a trifle audacious, 
a trifle shy, but very pretty, with a piece of paper held up ap- 
pealing!}' in her hand. She laid the paper on the desk in front 
of Bowman, and he noticed that she had to stand on her tiptoes 
to do it. 

"Will you add them for me. Mr. Bowman?'' she pleaded. "You 
don't know how mean they aet for me." 

Bowman's slight interest in the fluffy topknot immediately 
changed to a pronounced interest in the column of figures she 
handed him. 

•'Certainly." he answered. He ran his pencil rapidly up and 
down the column, while she stood beside him humming a little 
tune. In a moment he handed the slip back to her. "I think 
that fixes you." he said, happily. 

"Oh, thank you ever so much," she replied, softly. She stood 
a moment, sliding the paper back and forth in a ridge at the 
side of the desk. "I'm afraid you think it was awful funny of 
me to ask you," she continued, hesitatingly. "You always seem 
so busy." 

"Why. I'm never too busy to help you." he said. With a quiet 
impersonal pleasure he watched the pretty color surge up into 
Inr cheeks. "Or any of the other girls," ti£ added genially. 

Miss Pinley turned on her little heel and walked away so 
quickly that Bowman was unaware of the smile that was curling 
her lips. A little ripple of giggles greeted her as she returned to 
the stenographers' corner. 

"Was it a frost:" inquired Miss Temple. 

"Maybe." replied Miss Finley non-committally. "But one 
frost doesn't make a winter. You just watch me." 

It was perfectly astonishing the number of things Miss Finley 
found after that which only Bowman could do for her. If the 
drawers of the desk became refractory and refused to open or 
shut, only Bowman's strong arm seemed to be considered equal 
to the task of getting them into working order again. She even 
got him to sharpen her pencils for her and her frequent appeals 
to him to know if her hat was on straight set him to wondering 
philosophically if a girl's hat could ever be considered on slraight. 

He felt no annoyance when she came to him one day appar- 
ently in the deepest despair because she couldn't find one of her 
hatpins, which was buried deep in the fluffy trimmings of her 
hat, hut afterward it occurred to him that life would be much 
simplified for them if girls didn't wear such fantastic things. 

About a week after this episode. Bowman was surprised one 
morning upon looking over toward the stenographers' corner to 
discover that Miss Finley's chair was vacant. He was even more 
surprised at the queer, sinking sensation that took possession of 
him when he realized that she was not there. His first impulse 
was to go over and ask where she was, but a sudden lit of ah 
seized him, and he decided not to. This made him uncomfortable 



January 1, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



for shyness and vacillation wore entirely new emotions to him. 
He dragged down one of his beloved ledgers and began writing 
in it. Instead of figures, he seemed to see a little pointed face 
in a mist of soft hair. 

At last he stuck his pen behind his ear and gave himself up de- 
liberately to reflection. After some minutes of unproductive men- 
tal labor over the problem in hand, he turned to the head book- 
keeper. 

'•Here." he said abruptly, "how does a fellow feel when he's 
in love?" 

The head bookkeeper looked at him scornfully. "Come off !" 
he ejaculated. 

"Go on and tell me," urged Bowman. "I'm in earnest. I 
want to know." 

The head book-keeper looked at him disgustedly over his 
glasses. ' "For an everlasting, all-round idiot," he said, "you 
certainly are the limit. She's got you going, has she?" 

Bowman said nothing more, but from his knitted brows and 
general air of unrest one might have gathered that he was still 
studying his own emotions. 

The next morning he was eagerly watching the door when Miss 
Finley, looking a little pale from her illness, came in. Without 
a moment's hesitation he went over to where she was standing. 
Neither of the other girls had arrived. 

"Miss Pinley," lie said, "I came over to tell you something. I 
just found it out yesterday. I'm in love with you." He stood 
back and regarded her with a look of the deepest interest. 

She gave a little nervous laugh. "Who told you?" she gasped. 

"I found it out myself," he said triumphantly. 

"I didn't think I could do it," she said soberly. "I told the 
girls I was going to try just for fun, but I didn't think I could. 
I told them the other day that I gave it up. [ thought you " 

Bowman's face grew stern for a moment. "You did it just for 
fun!" he said. "You never thought what it. might mean to me." 

She gave a quick little sobbing sigh. "I did it for fun at first," 
she said, "but afterward " 

"Well?" demanded Bowman. "Why did you do it afterward ?" 

"Because T — liked yon." she sniil. after a moment's pause. — 
i 'Mcago Men:?. 



Mn 



MR. AND MRS. SANTA GL \l s AT THE POLE. 
Dear old Santa Claus, as we've been told, 

Was a man not youn<;, but very old. 

His beard was long and white as snow. 

His gait was fast (as reindeers go. I 

His clothes were gay. and bis manners mild. 

He loved to visit every child. 

To make all happy was his delight : 

And bis visits were always made at night. 

This dear old fellow, for ages past. 

Has faced the storms and wintry blasts. 

The miles he traveled o'ei house-tops white 

• lust think, millions of miles in jus Jit ! 
Now. after centuries have come and g 

We're startled to hear he was DOi alone. 
Such news as this sets us all awry. 

For he kepi bis secret, and kept it sly. 

In the frozen regions of the A 

Santa Claws summered and made his home. 

lie lived on whale, and seal, and fish. 

All served on ice. a rare old dish. 

lie was lonesome, no doubt, aen are. 

No I omforts of home, no consoling words tic 

No loved ones to greet him. no woman in sight. 

• Inst think of the life thai he lived day and night. 
But Ci busy, as he's been known to do. 
For he took out his book and examined Page 2. 
Alas, for poor. Santy, his doom it was sealed. 
For now he is married, and bis secret revealed. 

iy was one of the gay old eoons : 
\\ ■ i-i 

Mr-. Santa Claus will vouch for what I 
\-k her— she'll be here on Christmas Pay. 
She will tell you t 1 ed, 

Then all doubts in your mind will be relieved, 

. Claus played the du role. 

Twaa he and his wife discovered the Pole. 
. Sant.: rth Pole. a. h. b. 




LIQUEUR 



PERES CHARTREUX 



—GREEN AND YELLOW— 

The original and genuine Chartreuse has always been and 
still is made by the Carthusian Monks (Peres Chartreux), who, 
since their expulsion from France, have been located at Tarra- 
gona, Spain; and. although the old labels and insignia originated 
by the Monks have been adjudged by the Federal Courts of this 
country to be still the exclusive property of the Monks, their 
world renowned product is nowadays known as "Liqueur Peres 
Chartreux." 



At first-class Wine Merchants. Grocers. Hotels. Cafes. 

Batter & Co.. 45 Broadway. New York, N. T. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 

Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. AJ1 legal papers drawn up accurately, 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglaa 601. 

Mark Lane, Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 246 Bush St. 
Phone Kearny 2629. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged: manufacturers of Karnes tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. 

OENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D-, D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 40S 
Weatbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Riegelhaupt, Snrjieon Chiropodists, formerly 
of fi Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and in-growing nails cured U and painless treatment. 

205-206 Westbank Building. S30 Market street. San Francisco. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 
People's Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United 
States at the hotels and residences in Oakland. Alameda and Berkeley. 
I attention to trans-bay baggage. Phones Oakland 4447; Alameda 
456; Berkeley 14; San Francisco. Kearny " 

Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street between 

Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. 

Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny • 

WM. BUCHANAN. 

Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties, Telegraph Poles, Shingles. Split Shakes, Etc 
Main Office— Crocker Bldg.. San Francisco 

Yards and Planin* Mills— Sixth and Channel Stsu San Francisco 

ALFRED BANNISTER 

EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 

1434 Pool Street San Fr&nclaco 

Phone Kmito 2871 



Brushes 



33 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januaht 1, 1910. 



BANKING 

Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO " 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Capital. Surplus and Undivided Profits $10,868,154.20 

Deposits 20.612,588.66 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10.916.762.32 

Isaias W. Hellman. President 1. W. Hellman. Jr., Vice-President 

F. L. Lipman, Vice-President Frank 8. King, - - - Cashier 

George Grant, Assist. Cashier W. McGavln. - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs, Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Isaias W. Hellman Wm. F. Herrln Leon Sloss F. W. Van Slcklen C. DeGulgne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan H. E. Law Dudley Evans J. Henry Meyer 

I. W. Hellman. Jr. Chas. J. Deering Wm. Hass F. L. Lipman E. H. Harriman 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New account 

are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



Uff@ 9 § Ml IDtoy 

GEORGE K. SHIFLET 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000. 



Reserve, $6,000,000 



DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES . 

Arrangements have recently been completed under which the branches 
of this Bank are able to Issue Drafts on the principal points 
in the following countries: 
Austria- Hungary Finland. Ireland 

Belgium Formosa Italy 

Brazil France Japan 

Bulgaria Fr'ch Cochln-ChinaJava 

Ceylon Germany Manchuria 

China Great Britain Mexico 



Crete Greece 

Denmark Holland 

Egypt Iceland 

Faroe Islands India 

NO DELAY IN ISSUING. 



Norway 
Persia 



Russia 

Servia 

Slam 

South Africa 

Straits Settlements 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 



San Francisco Office 
some streets. 



Philippine Islands West Indies 
Roumania and elsewhere. 

FULL PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION. 



-Bruce Heathcote, Manager, California and San- 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

THE GERMAN BANK. 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
526 California Street, San Francisco, California. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital Actually Paid up In Cash 1.000.000.00 

•Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,504.498.68 

Deposits. June 30, 1909 36.793.234.04 

Total Assets 39,435,681.38 

Remittances may be made by Draft, Post Office or Wells, Fargo & Co.'s 
money orders, or coin by express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 12 
o'clock m., and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m., to 8 o'clock p. 
m., for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President. N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President. Daniel Meyer; 
Second "Vice-President Emit Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier, William Herrmann: Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secre- 
tary, A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emll Rohte, Ign. 
Steinhart. I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillmann, Jr., E. T. Kruse, 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, between 21st and 22d street. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer. Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement St.. between 5th and 6th 
avenues. For receipt and payment of Deposits only. W. C. Heyer, man- 
ager. 

Central Truft Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue 
Accounts of Individuals, firms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world. 
Capital paid In, 11,600,000. Surplus. $100,000. 
B. G. TOGNAZZI , Manager. 

French Savings Bank 

108 SUTTER ST.. NEAR MONTGOMERY. 

Paid-up Capital 1600,000 

Total Assets $4,270,800 

Strictly a savings bank. Open Saturday evenings from 7 to 8:30. 

OFFICERS— Charles Carpy. President; Arthur Legallet. First Vice- 
President; Leon Bocqueraz. Second Vice-President; A. Bousquet, Secre- 
tary; A. Bergerot. Attorney. 

DIRECTORS — N. C. Babln. J. A. Bergerot, O. Bozlo. Charles Carpy, 
Arthur Legallet. G. Beleney. H. de St. Seine. J. M. Dupas, Leon Boc- 
queraz, J. E. Artigues, J. S. Godeau, John Glnty. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. 

The French-American Bank occupies offices In the same building. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. E. CORNER SANSOME AND PINE STREETS 
Capital, $4,000,000 Surplus, $1,360,000 

SIG. GREENEBAUM. President; H. FLEISHHACKER,' Vice-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER, Vice-President; C. F. HUNT. Vice- 
President; R. ALTSCIIUL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Cashier; 
F. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit, available throughoul 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 

Italian-American Bank 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

Paid-up Capital $760,000 

Surplus 210,000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers in foreign exchange 
Officers — A. Sbarboro, President; A. E. Sbarboro. Cashier- H. J 
Crocker, Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro. Assistant Cashier. 



A new day born ! 

And night is vanquished by the lances of the morning sun. 

The massy clouds, rolled in majestic mountain forms, appear 

To mingle with their own, dark hue 

Sierra's grander, deeper blue. 

Now glowing with the benediction of the morning light, 

The gilded clouds no longer veil the sun ; 

But he appears above yon wall of blue and gold 

And higher rising beams on all 

And day is born. 

Bright hopes and fair ideals — 

Like lovely dawns adorn 

Youth's roseate morn. 

TTnmarred by any cloud 

Life seems a joyous day. 

We know not what the future holds. 

We only dream and pray. 

Within the heart of youth a thought, 

A feeling and a restless longing stirs 

To gain the knowledge yet unsought 

And leave behind the narrow school of youth 

To search for greater wisdom, deeper truth. 

Youth, yearning stands upon life's threshold 
While the future — unknown — vast — 
The world's arena — lies before him, 
A in I behind him childhood's past. 

The fair, sweet dawn that hallows his life's morn 
Before day'.- garish beams doth fade away, 
And youth into the clearer light of life is born. 

Oh, youth, without a thought of care, 
Not all life"s path is strewn with roses fair, 
The future ever leans unto the present 
And the morrow's greatest needs 
Are not fulfilled by dreams and plans 
But by to-day's own deeds. 

The hopes and dreams and longings of the present — 
Bright pictures by our fancies drawn — 
Are like the changing lights, that play 
Prelusive of life's fuller day 
About the early dawn. 

The greatest blessings that life holds 

Are not the fruit of laughter but of tears, 

Youth's empty pleasure, childhood's thoughtless mirth, 

Give us no visioned hope for future years. 

For like the ephemeral gleam that comes 

From wasted embers, dying coals. 

They shed no steady light upon our way 

And give no promise for another day. 

We learn the greatest lessons from our sorrows. 
Our sweetest joy oft comes from saddest thought, 
And by our tears and prayers are bought 
Resplendent visions and conceptions clear. 

Life's day for us began with glorious dawn. 

What noon may bring 

We cannot tell and may not know 

Until we stand within the sun's strong light, 

And, having lived it — understand. 

Youth, gird thyself with hope 

And with unwavering faith look to the coming years, 

Secure in knowing that the present's work well wrought 

Builds firmly for the future in each noble deed and tho't, 

"Foster ever in thy soul the high ideals 

That alone may lead us to the fullest life. 

For our ideals are God-given and suppress 
The merely human by exalting the divine 
Within our natures; then onward let us press, 
On into life's full day; 
For youth, and hope and courage conquer all. 



DOMINICAN 
COLLEGE 



SAN RAFAEL, 
CALIFORNIA 



*j0 *# *j# 

L*^ CJ^ L*T^ 



A Boarding Scnool for Young Women, conducted by the Sisters 
of St. Dominic, situated in Magnolia Valley and protected by the 
lofty hills of the Tama I pa Is Range. Fifty minutes by boat and 
train from San Francisco. Climate unsurpassed for healthfulness. 
Ideal conditions for scholastic work. 

Classical, Scientific and Commercial Courses. Specially organized 
departments of Music, Art and Domestic Economy. Well equipped 
Library and Laboratory. Accredited by the University of California. 



It Heats Like a Furnace 

The Latest and the Best in Gas Heaters 



The VULCAN 

(A Perfect Gas Heater) 

Note the features of the Vulcan 
—The red cone in the center 
produces an Intense, Odorless Heat 
and gives the effect of a cheer- 
ful fireplace to a room. 




12 STYLES 
$3.75 to $12.00 



Call at our store and see 
this marvelous heater In 
operation. Learn how eas- 
ily and cheaply you can 
secure heat and comfort 
this winter. 



Barler's OH Heaters— 

Guaranteed Odorless. 

Cole's Hot Blast Stoves - 
For 'Wood or Coal. 

Searchlight Coal OH— The 

Best for Heater, oil Cook 
Stove or Lamp Use. 



Chas. Brown & Sons 

871-873 MARKET ST. 

Headquarters for 

"HEATERS THAT HEAT" 




THE BEST BEER ON EARTH 

Phone Douglas 671 

Ask for Brewery's Own Bottling Prompt Service and Delivery 




The 



Egyptian 
Cigarette 
of Quality 

AJLOMATIC DELICACY 

MILDNESS 

PURITY 



At your Club or Dealer's or 
TUB SURBRUO CO., Makers, New York 



A Swell Polish for a Swell Car 

Blue Ribbon Cream 
Metal Polish 




It makes any car look swell. 
It's an Emulsion— a thick Oil Cream Polish. Does not settle. 

LEAVES NO POWDER OR SEDIMENT 

For sale by all dealers. Ask or write for sample. 

Use BLUE RIBBON for Speed, Durabil- 
ity, Brilliancy 

See that the label bears our registered Trade Mark 



Soups, Entrees and Desserts 

are made rich and delicious when 

BORDEN'S 

PIONEER 

BRAND EVAPORATED 

MILK 

(Unsweetened) 




is used in preparing 
them. Try it, and 
see the "difference." 



BORDEN'S CONDENSED MILK CO. 

"Leaders of Quality" 
Est. 1857 




SAVES TIME 

TO BUY OR SELL 
X FT F 1 

BOSTON 
GARTER 

KNOWN TO EVERYBODY 



WORN ALL OVER 
THE WORLD 
MADE WITH 




jA*i* 



CUSHION 
RUBBER BUTTON 

CLASP 
OF ANY DEALER, ANYWHERE 

or Sample Pair, Cotton, 26c, Silk. 50c. 
Mailed on Receipt of Price 



GEORGE FROST CO. 

Makers. Boston 



OVER 30 YEARS THE STANDARD 



ALWAYS EASY 




EiUMIihtd July 20. f&J» 




Devoted to the Leading interests of California and the Pacific Coaat. 




VOL. LXXIX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 8, 1910 



Ni. 2 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal.. Ppst-offlce as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



— — Zelaya is awfully sorry the United States is so poorly 
governed. 

The cost of living continues to tend upward, but not so 

with chances to earn the cost. 

How to get away from election promises is the burden 

the new city officials are carrying. 

The vegetarian craze has not reached the political stage 

of organization yet, but may later on. 

The now order of things in San Francisco is not giving 

out plums by the basketful. The howler should get his hire. 

San Jose complains of being vice-ridden. Is there not. 

enough truly good citizens down there to unhorse the riders? 

Lei the demand be made right now for a business instead 

of a political management of San Francisco's public concerns. 

Don't let San Francisco start 1910 in any slipshod way. 

Let business run things and send politics to — yes, call it that. 

Utery employee of a politically managed public concern 

may he relied upon to sustain the party that bosses the payroll. 

The Pullman Company has granted Kansas a reduction 

of fifty cents a berth. California wants something of the same 
kind. 

So far, the ultimate consumer lias done nothing but grum- 
ble. Still, they say he is gelling ready to do things harsh and 
dreadful. 

The Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce is growing wise. 

II is coming to San Francisco in a body to learn how to do things 
on a big scale. 

Taft may not know much about practical politics, but he 

certainly knows what kind of laws the country is in need of to 

protect it from industrial monopolies. 

We are on the most affectionate terms with Japan, but 

just to he doing something, why not put Pearl Harbor in shape 
lo do business as a big naval station? 

The reason why George Washington ate with his knife 

was because it was the fashionable way. nor is there any law 
nst it in this day ami generation. 

The Democratic minority in Congress has decided to favor 

uerwavs preposition ami oppose ship subsidies. Of course 
would have to be "agin" something. 

A Now York judge decides that, while it. is the duty of the 

father to work everv dav. his wife and children may have access 
lo his earnings all the time. That's (pieer law. 

The bills are iu and audited. We pay $6,000,000 for the 

Horl to put Cuba in the righl path to national worthiness. 
It is hard to make silk purses from the ears of pigs. 

The iiooks of thi S show a net profil 

i,000,000 for I'.' .11 doing business 

at the same old stand, with no one to molest or make afraid. 



Inasmuch as the discovery of the "North Pole kicked up 

such a rumpus, would it not be well to leave the South Pole's 
whereabouts undiscovered ? 

Evidently New York is getting tired of being called the 

Sodom of America. In the last four years thirty-two new houses 
of worship have been erected in the town. 

Two million dollars is not too much to pay for changing 

the conduct of the public affairs of San Francisco from a politi- 
cal to a sound business system of management. 

In becoming a prohibitionist, Mr. Bryan forgot to look 

after his press agent's views on the subject. Abbott is his name, 
and he says all "dry" towns are to be avoided by shows and lec- 
turers. 

The multitude of drums and horns and whistles that have 

been making life hardly worth the living in this town since 
Christmas morning proves that December 25th is far from being 
a myth. 

The exclusive set of the ultra- fashionables has concluded 

the only way to avoid the contaminating touch and smell of 
plebeians is to live in airships. May cyclones deal gently with 
them. 

It is pretty well settled that the monetary problem will be 

permitted to rest quietly in its own shell for another year. Al- 
drich thinks that way. and Aldrich usually sees that things come 
his way. 

It is reported that no less than six Congressmen asked 

the President for the pen with which he wrote his message. He 
replied that it was not his to give. He dictated the document to 
his stenographer. 

Another ai ei alarmist has been heard from. He 

says Europe could land 3.000,000 men on our shores with per- , 
feet ease. Perhaps, but they would need return tr 11 
immediately. 

The Geary street venture, under the city charter as it now 

reads, will demonstrate in manv ways the unwisdom of munici- 
pal operation of public utilities on lines of political ethi 
partisan favoritism. 

Soldiers and sailors are lionized if they accomplish 

things on the fields and waters of human slaughter, hut far 
greater are the men who devote their lives searching thi 
of diseases and their cure. 

-Senator Davis, of Arkansas, remarked the other day: 



"There are a good many rotten spuds in this end of the Capitol 
building." Senatorial courtesy permits a member to refer to 
■If in any way he likes. 

A Chicago paper boasts that the real, genuine thing in the 

way of "the model husband" has been found in that city. When 
did he leave San Francisco, and what did he go to Chicago for? 
Certainly not for an affinity. 

A New York societv woman asserts that no lady can live 

eomfortablv on less than (60.000 a year, and no- then unll 
head of the house pays the current expenses of the establishment. 
No douht she hegan life as a "hello sirl" or a ballet dan 

Admiral Togo has retired from the Japanese navy, but 

retirement - soldier or sailor in Japan means that he is 

life membership in what is called the National Conn- 
eil. which - rest honor that could be conferred by the 

Emperor. 



EUMTOHU AL 



EMT 



Spring Valley 

\ ,i> the Mayor. 



It is not the desire of 'the News 
Letter to be unduly critical in hand- 
ling Mr. P. IT. McCarthy, Mayor- 
elect of the city of San Francisco, 
bui the >land taken by him seems to justify at least an expression 
of opinion, and it is the desire of the News Letter to go on rec- 
ord in the matter because of the views of some of those who have 
found their wa) into print as to the weekly newspapers. 

It may now be taken as a foregone conclusion that the Iletch- 
Hetchy project is a real and tangible thing, and that it will, un- 
less crippled or killed by some monumental mis-management, be- 
come a real asset to the city at some not far distant future time. 
The question that seems to take up the time of our wise men is, 
whether the entire system of the Spring Valley shall be bought 
by the city, or whether the city shall build and operate its own 
distributive system. 

The Mayor-elei I says in no uncertain language that he is op- 
posed to the purchase of the Spring Valley system. He is not in 
favor of a bond issue that will be calculated to furnish funds to 
cover this expenditure. He claims that such would be an over- 
issue, and that it would involve us in all kinds of litigation both 

in San Francisco and in Alameda Counties. There is great ri1 

in the Mayor-elect's pronuneiamento in the daily press. "We 
know where he stands. 

The News Letter is opposed to the purchase of the system of 
storage lakes and reservoirs belonging to the Spring Valley Com- 
pany. The Ileicii-Hetchy supply once available to the city neces- 
sitates some sort of distributive system, and that of the Spring 
Valley Company is ample to meet all the demands tor some time 
to come. If this system of distributive pipes is available at a 
price that is not prohibitive, the city can well afford to pay even 
more than it would cost to install it, because of the immediate 
delivery, and the fact that the streets would not be torn to pieces 
in the installation of any new system. Outside lines would have 
to be established in any instance, and may as easily be made ad- 
ditional to the present Spring Valley system as to any system 
that might be installed by the municipality or by private' parties. 

Selling that part of its system which is of real value to the city 
and maintaining that part which may be made a great produc- 
tive asset along the peninsula and in Alameda County, mean- a 
simplification of the problem, and this scheme would certainly 
dispose of the idea of an over-issue of bonds. Would such a 
scheme meet with the approval of Mayor-elect McCarthy? We 
have hopes that it would, as it«would assist him in an ideal de- 
velopment of his "get together" idea. It is said, and we are not 
prepared to meet the idea with refutal, that Mayor-elect Mc- 
Carthy has his eve on the money expenditures a new distributive 
system would entail. This may or may not be true, but, if it is 
true, it is too bad. 



The outlook for San Francisco this 
Sa* Francisco's new year is, to sav the least, magni- 

Hoi-E for the New Tear, ficent. Re-established firmly on" its 

i el again after the tire, with all of 
our big banks reporting a boom business, and with a new and 
progressive administration at out head. we are prepared to do 
the biggest year's business of our life. The very world is ours, 
in fact, for San Francisco is to the Pacific Coast what New 
York is to the Atlantic, and comparatively and geographically, 
speaking, perhaps even of greater importance. Certainly no city 
in the East has such a prospect for growth. Soon the greal 
Panama Canal, lying almost at our doors, will bring to us by 
direct route the enormous trade of the Gulf and the Atlantic. 
In the Far East the demands of awakening China and Japan 
have already started in motion our fullest activities of supply, 
and San Francisco is the heart around which this Pacific Coast 
world must develop. Then, again, look to South America and 
its numerous republics. Even now a better understanding ex- 
ists between these peoples and ourselves, and it is bound to im- 
prove as time goes on; and such reciprocity of spirit must neces- 
sarily mean a greater confidence in trade.' II there is any limit 
to South American resources or wealth it has neve: jrel been esti- 
mated. Yet this region of Eldorado is only a few' days distant 
from us, with its treasures demanding an outlet. Our State and 
local industries, too, are all developing along splendid lines. As 



for San Francisco, itself, where is there another such city, or one 
so beautiful or desirable. Loved around the world, it is the Mecca 
of souls, and its spirit combines the best in chivalry, grace, love, 
daring and pre-eminence. Out of that spirit it accomplished 
what no other city in the world could have accomplished 
— its complete rehabilitation in a few months — and it stands to- 
day a magnificent spectacle of what eomaraderie and a people 
united in heart can do. Deep down in its soul, an eternal spring, 
is the joy of living, and as its philosophy of life embraces a 
world, so it is capable of making a world happy. Nothing is too 
big for it, no dream too high. And this 1910 it treads its way 
with a supreme happiness that infects even its least souls and 
makes them great. 



On the homely principle that "a 
A Red Hot Stove. burned child dreads fire," it may be 

well that San Francisco has deter- 
mined to make an experiment in municipal railroading. The 
Geary street proposition is a red hot stove, but the people have 
determined to handle it. Probably nothing but actually burning 
their fingers could cure them of the hallucination that it is safe 
to entrust the management and operation of a street railroad to 
politicians who hold office for only two years at a time. It is 
certainly better that this demonstration should be made now on 
a single line, upon which only a very small portion of the public 
need depend for service, than if the city had waited until the 
franchises of more important systems expired and a popular 
craze for municipal operation still prevailed. It is a safe wager 
that after a few months of actual experience of municipal rail- 
roading the people will be more anxious to get rid of their red 
hot. stove than thev were to obtain it. 



It is curious and illuminating to re- 
Abuse Against Reason, fleet that the recent campaign in 

favor of the Geary street bonds was 
waged by sensational newspapers with a minimum of reasonable 
attempt to demonstrate the merits of the proposition, but with 
the maximum of noisy and irrational abuse of the United Rail- 
roads. The corporation, which has performed invaluable service 
in the rebuilding of the city, was misrepresented and maligned 
without rhyme or reason. Among its foremost offenses was its 
"effrontery" in bill-posting the city with warnings against the 
Geary street bonding scheme. It now appears that the United 
Railroads had nothing whatever to do with the billboard cam- 
paign, which was launched by the Geary Street Company itself. 
The woes Of "Mr. Straphanger" were drawn in the most heart- 
rending designs, and the Geary street road was prescribed as a 
panacea for their woes. It is probably true that straphangers 
will never cumber the Geary street road as long as it remains a 
one street and without transfer municipal line. 



Straphangeijs. 



If our yellow journals could be be- 
lieved, the woes of "the strap- 
hanger" are peculiar to San Fran- 
cisco. But in every large city in the world there is the same in- 
surmountable problem of transporting the crowds of people who 
all desire to travel in one direction during the rush hours. The 
problem is by no means confined to street railroads. Near at 
home the ferries, on which thousands of people every day must 
be content with standing room, supply sufficiently notable ex- 
ample. Any sane person knows, if he takes the trouble to think, 
that it is not possible to operate a street railroad or a ferry sys- 
tem with equipment and force sufficient for the traffic of two 
or three hours a day only. Moreover, every observant San Fran- 
ciscan cannot fail to notice that it would be impossible to main- 
tain a more constant headway of cars than on Market street at 
present. The "no seat, no fare" nostrum is sometimes advanced. 
It is the law in France that only as many passengers may bond 
a car as there are seats. The consequence is, that in Paris there 
are free fights and constant scrimmages among would-be pas- 
sengers, while those unable or disinclined to indulge in such 
ercise are compelled to wait an hour or more before they can 
start their journey. Americans, always in a hurry, would 
tolerate such a system. 



JANUABY S, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



3 



The charter provision for a board of 
A Top-heavy System. Supervisors of eighteen members 

not only makes that branch of the 
Government not less top-heavy than ineffective; besides, by the 
very methods of selecting the board and the remuneration for 
services obliges a political rather than a business conduit of the 
affairs of the city. The charter makes the board top-heavy in 
that eighteen Supervisors are at least twice as many "bosses." so 
to speak, as any private business enterprise of the same magni- 
tude would require, and the board as a whole is inefficient because 
the members are not expected to devote a great deal of their 
time to the duties of the office. Tt would not be fair to oblige 
men engaged in business enterprises of their own to neglect their 
private interests to serve the public practically for nothing. 

The fact is, sound business methods would have the charter 
lay out the city into about seven or nine districts, each being 
entitled to representation in the supervisory department. These 
seven or nine districts should be and constitute the supervisory 
authority of the municipality, and representatives should be 
selected with reference to their business ability, experience and 
integrity, and they should be required to devote their whole time 
to their official duty, but, of course, they should have salaries 
sufficiently liberal to justify them in devoting their whole time 
to the public's interests. And not only so, but each district 
representative on the board should, in a sense, be the attorney 
for his constituents — ever ready to present the needs of his 
district before the board when sitting en banc. As the board is 
now constituted, the public business of the city is divided among 
more than a dozen committees, with no obligation upon any 
member to give more of his time and attention to subjects before 
his committee than his private business interests will allow. In 
this particular, nearly every citizen has had opportunity to judge 
of the inefficiency of the board because of inability to have busi- 
ness despatched before the board or by committees with reason- 
able promptness. 

A board of seven or nine thoroughly capable business men 
could and would manage the affairs of the city exactly as they 
would if they were co-partners in a great commercial enterprise. 
and each member would be careful to he at his desk watching 
the details and hourly happenings of his enterprise. Precisely 
the same business principles and customs should prevail in con- 
ducting the supervisory department of San Francisco, but men 
of capacity equal to such a demand are not to be obtained for 
$100 a month. Their compensation should be commensurate 
with the magnitude of the responsibilities of the office, and in 
keeping with what the great business enterprises of the country 
pay for such service. 

The charter of San Francisco should be changed so that the 
administration of the public concerns of the city may be in har- 
mony with strict business principles and customs. The Heard of 
Supervisors, being the center of power and author! II as 

of politico] influence in the city Government as now constituted. 
that is the spot for the public eve to gaze upon. 



Huh, Systems. 



A dual system of telephonic com- 
munication is dubbed a DUisal 
all Eastern cities where it has 
tried. Let US profit h\ the example of those who have allowed 
themselves to be led into error. 

We cannot hope to advance on conservative lines of the live 
and let live policy if we. as a municipality, adopt the idea that 
the best way to encourage capital is to strangle it. The estab- 
lishment of a second telephonic system in the city of San Fran- 
. ISCO sprang from a desire for revenge on the old system b 
of what was alleged to be its arbitrary conduct, and was fostered 
B little later by those who would immediately profit by th< 
lishment of a new system. But the City Fathers removed what 
little call there was for adverse criticism on account 
by establishing a fixed rate from which the company may not 
deviate. The service was improved, and there is now practically 
no complaint, and the service is about the best in the Fnited 
States. 

Thus, it is shown that the idea of a din - -prings not 

from a necessity, but from the desire on the part of the opposi- 
impany to break in on a field where 'lie service is excellent 
ami where there is practically no complaint. It is probably every 
right to attempt to feathi individual or by 

corporate effort, but it is also the right of the public to ;. 
itself against the infliction of useless charge and inconvenience. 



If it could be shown truthfully that the present, telephone ser- 
vice is inadequate to the public demand, and that the charges 
are out of proportion to the service rendered ; if it could be shown 
that the new company is in reality a competitive factor in the 
utilities that purvey to the comfort of the citizen, there would be 
some sense in a general adoption of the new company's service, 
but such showing cannot be made. 

On the other hand, it can be conclusively shown that the in- 
stallation of a new system is the installation of a very bothersome 
element in the daily life of the citizen of San Francisco. The 
old system has on its lists an almost total of all business houses 
and residences. 

Then why should the public be bothered by a duplication of a 
minority of these names? Tt has been found in other cities that 
the dual system is only a nuisance, and that, finally, the duality 
is continued, but that the profits, in many instances, go to the 
same corporation, through a dummy. Is that the case ben-? 



Frederick Remington. 



In the passing of Frederick Reming- 
ton, America loses one of its truly 
great artists. Moreover, as art is 
greatest of all things we can look upon him as one of our truly 
great men. Out of the West he came, too, for the genius be 
made known to the world was born here, and the types in chaps 
and khaki that he made universally famous belong here. No 
other artist has been so much a portrayer of his time or of char- 
acteristic American life. Out on the breadth of the plains and 
the cattle ranges, and the mountain trails. Remington caught 
that singing note of existence, that hymn of divine crudeness, 
virility, freedom and power that the "West amid its flaunt of 
color has sung since birth, and the artist in him stirred and 
understood, grasped the primitive, tragical, joyous truth of it, 
and his deft, genius undertook to reproduce what he had fell. 
How he succeeded we all know well. So long as men arc men, 
the name of Frederick Remington will live as a painter of men 
men of desert and trail, of burning sand and alkali bed, of mas- 
tery, devil-may-careness and chivalry, men in whom hope 
gave out, and who died with their faces up — g 
they had been, and with no kick coming. He left pictures of 
our West, indeed, that however that West may fall from itself, 
the world can never forget it. because they are too tru 
vivid with life, too brimming of tissue, characteristic and climax 
-fixed forever in our memories through their half-wild, yet 
human, appeal to our own desires, and in the plunge of colors 
that made so individual the Remington art. And vet in it all the 
be drew were of himself, for no one bad learned more thor- 
idrit of them. Lot us bid him farewell, then. 
the westerner, would part with us h wave of the baud, a smile 

as we leave him with his face upon the trail; but by unnun 
camp fires his spirit and genius will still sit amongst us. 



The Panama Canal. 



The Panama Canal will soon be 
finished. Sooner a good deal than 
you expect. It will seem no time 
at all before we will be celebrating the opening of the great Isth- 
mian water-way joining the two seas. By the time the canal is 
finished we should.be prepared with enongh American vessels to 
make a showing. We should really have some kind of an apology 
for opening the canal. A • we should have a ration 

d't Ire. Unless we make haste to repair the errors of the past, 
we will find that the American ship is bound to disappear, and, 
with her, the stars and stripes from the face of the deep we once 
conquered and then lost. 

"Aye. tear her tattered ensign down. 

Long has it waved on high. 
And manv an eye has danced to see 

That banner in the sky." 

To prevent this possibility, you should become a member of the 
Marine League of California. Let us meet subsidy with sub- 
invention by subvention. Do you love the fl.._ 
- a member of the Merchant Marine League of California. 

"Owing to the importance of the work in hand," the mem- 
bership of that waterways lobbv has been increased from 500 to 
If Uncle Sam does not dig that Chicago-Gulf of Mexico 
ditch at his own expense, it will not be the fault of the noble 
800. They are in Washington for business. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



Taft's CnnpoEATiox 
Policy. 



From recent utterances of President 
Taft and conferences he has had 
with Senators and Congressmen, 
which have heen made public, the 
policy of the administration is going to be decidedly hostile to 
monopolistic trade and transportation corporations, and. fur- 
thermore, Congress will he asked to enact laws obliging all semi- 
public utility and industrial corporations that do an interstate 
business to procure charters from the National Government. 
More than on -e, recently, the President ha- intimated that he 
wants several very positive and definite amendments to the so- 
called Sherman anti-trust law, that will clothe the filters 

Commerce Commission with greater power in the mallei' of 
regulating railway freight rates and passenger fares, and in his 
message he pointed out the need of a new Federal court to have 
jurisdiction over corporations that, cross State lines in the dis- 
tribution of their products, dust how far he would go in 
clothing the commerce commission with authority to supervise 
the conduct of chartered business enterprises is not definitely 
known, but there is reason to believe that he is becoming an ex- 
tremist, or has become one since the recent decision in the 
Standard Oil case. 

It is sincerely to be hoped, however, that he will not go to the 
length advocated by the school of extremists to which Senators 
La Toilette and Cummins belong. Supervision of the conduct 
of capital aggregations that are engaged in industrial enter- 
prises to the extent of restricting profits to a given per cent on 
the capital employed would certainly be a menace to capital and 
operate to the disadvantage of larger enterprises. There is a 
vast difference between a corporation that restricts trade 
stroving competition and a corporation that restricts trade by 
the employment of superior machinery for the manufacture and 
distribution of products. Trade that is restricted by the appli- 
cation or employment of snperior business ability and facilities 
is not wrongfully destroying competition, and to handicap its 
energy and push would only operate to protect the slothful and 
go-easy enterprises. Competition is not the only thing that is 
the life of trade. Business sagacity, energy and business eco- 
nomics never fails to drive out competition that is weak and 
shiftless. Hence in formulating laws to govern and regulate 
business enterprises, it might be wise and prudent to avoid kill- 
ing the goose that lavs golden eggs. It is a short cut from trade 
encouragement to trade discouragement, and hostile legislation 
always shortens the way. 



Scheme to 

DlSTTHB lit S1NBSS. 



Senator Cummins and his fellow in- 
surgents, or "progressives," as they 
prefer calling themselves, are de- 
termined to re-open the tariff ques- 
tion, and keep up the agitation during the entire session of 
Congress unless they .accomplish their purpose sooner. No one 
will deny, in the face of the steadily advancing cost of table 
commodities, that they are in some degree justified in demand- 
ing some modification of the cause. But it is doubtful if the 
proposed agitation is wise at this time, for the whole country 
is entering upon what gives promise of a long season of pros- 
perity, and it would not take a great deal of adversi criticism of 
the stability of existing industrial conditions to create unrest 
and suspicion of their stability to destroy or at least to weaken 
the props upon which the business world has placed its hopes 
and prospects. For this reason, any purpose OT effort to re-open 
the question of tariff revision is to he deplored. 

Then, again, the President has a scheme in hand that prom- 
ises well to remedy any evils of the new tariff. He proposes 
that a commission composed of tariff experts shall be created, 
and all suggestions or proposed changes in the schedules be re- 
ferred to the commission, who shall, in turn formulate other 
schedules for submission to Congress, thus relieving that body 
of all initial work in the premises. This plan meets with the 
sanction of the Democratic minority as well as with most of the 
Republican majority. However. Cummins. La Toilette and the 
other insurgents seem bent on agitating the question, and if 
possible, force Congress into undertaking the revision of the 
Payne-Aldrich Act, no matter how much the business situation 
may be disturhed. hut the influence of President Taft may lie re- 
lied upon to defeat anv and all schemes that would be likely to 
weaken the industrial situation. 



Our Duty in 
Centual America 



The Pacific Coast, especially San 
Francisco, has too many present and 
prospective commercial interests in- 
volved in the political disturbing - 
in Central America to much longer wait in patience for the 
Government at Washington to assert itself, and oblige the dis- 
turbing elements down there to have respect for law and order. 
Former President Zelaya is in Mexico practically a refugee from 
justice, and the Mexican Government is largely to blame for his 
escape. Our Government, instead of landing a force in Nicar- 
agua and dealing with all disturbing elements as so many ene- 
mies of the United States, officially recognized President Mad- 
riz as Xelaya'- successor without consulting any one having au- 
thority within or without that country, and now the situation is 
worse than ever. General Estrada, the recognized leader of the 
revolutionists, and who aspired to Zelaya's Presidential epau- 
lets, is jn the field with a larger army than before, and positively 
refuses to recognize the Presidency of Madriz. Meanwhile, Ze- 
laya is plotting assassinations and other bloody work in his 
Mexican retreat. 

A great deal of Pacific Coast money has been invested in vari- 
ous Nicaraguan enterprises, and not a few Americans are there 
trying to protect their interests, hut unless protection is afforded 
them Bpeedily, the chances for safety to life and property will be 
slim. The hesitating policy of the Washington authorities only 
serves to make the several factions more desperate and less in- 
clined to give protection to Americans. The fact is, not only 
are the lives and property of Pacific Coast citizens in great dan- 
ger, but all the factions are agreed on a course of hostility to the 
United States, and especially to the Panama Canal. In the face 
of all this, the wonder is, that this nation hesitates to reach out 
its strong arm and put a stop to the murderous policy of the 
Zelayas and the Madrizea and the Estradas and all other cut- 
throats of their stamp and give protection to the lives and prop- 
erty of Americans. 



-■ — One of the very prettiest of the Christmas menus was 
that of the Hotel Normandie of this city. In one corner of the 
outside cover is pictured in colors three bronze bells ringing out 
the "chimes of Normandie," while around them glow the golden 
poppy hells of California. The outside wording is "Christinas 
Cheer at Hotel Normandie, Sin Francisco, California. 1909." 
The dinner card and the music program, both elaborate, are 
preceded by a verselet which is a parody on one of Lord Byron's 
irruptions. It is as follows: "The carol of the Christmas chimes 
have charmed by ear since childhood's toys and times: but how 
I love (I do not dare to tell t that tocsin of the soul — the dinner 
bell." All of the patrons of the bote] unite in high praise of 
the management. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




m CHAS.KE1LOS & C< 
HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 
WE'VF BEEN TRYING TO EDUCATE MEN FOLKS FOR YEARS TO 
BUY GOOD, READY-MADE CLOTHES. WE'VE SUCCEEDED SPLEN- 
DIDIY. REAL GOOD DRESSERS YOU SEE ARE GRADUATES AND 
BOOSTERS OF CLOTHES SHOPS LIKE OURS. MORE AND MORE 
MEN YEARLY ARE FALLING IN LINE FOR GOOD. WE'VE THE 
BEST CLOTHES MADE. 



Ot'R CLOTHES 
ARE ESPECIALLY 
MADE POl! US. 



THAT'S WHY 



<ffbaa^lisA<ffa w 



J^anjfrmtcisncn, 



SOMETHING 
DIFFERENT 



This is the positive era of clothes culture. The custom tailor 
Js surely being displaced. In an exclusive men's clothes shop, 
like ours, where we make men's clothes a special feature, and 
where the best elothes made are carried, Is the proper plaro 
to come for your i • 1 . . 1 1 1 * ■ s . Wo trtkf an int'-r.-sl in von and 111 
you right, give you snappy or good, conservative stylei i : 
best tailor on earth couldn't do better. There's lots oi Ideas 
here others haven't got. 



Jewelers Building, Post Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



.] i\tu;v 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



£iklbw©ini5}(gn5i Wf}®;@°Es}[na@irg 



By Harriet Watson Capwell. 



The Town and Gown Club of Berkeley has been given front 
page, scare-head notoriety because, after an exhaustive debate, 
the majority voted that "married women are justified in becom- 
ing wage-earners." As a wage earner, a university-bred woman, 
and of married estate, I am naturally keenly interested in what 
this college town club has to say on the subject. From the stand- 
point of the wage-earner, I find their discussion most amazing. 
Mrs. Lange, wife of the acting president of the University of 
California, is quoted : ''Man's attitude against married women 
leaving the home to secure work is the result of prejudice, false 
pride and inherited feeling. It is a relic of the harem seclusion 
era. Men still wish — many men at least — the entire life of 
women they marry. The divorce evil may be largely traced to 
this very 'spirit, to this seclusion of women and their consequent 
pursuit of some nervine. Without a healthful occupation, 
woman turns to an affinity for stimulus, while the husband seeks 
some one with whom ho can talk over a French dinner." 

I should like to know where Mrs. Lange has gathered her 
material. Where has she found married women eager to become 
wage-earners restrained from so doing by the "prejudice, false 
pride and inherited feeling" of husbands. The circle of women 
wage-earners which the years have described around my horizon 
is a large one, and the married women wage-earners have been 
divided into two classes: those who work, more or less complain- 
ingly and ungraciously to help out a shiftless or unfortunate hus- 
band; those who are gifted with some talent, and alter marriage 
continue to put it to commercial use. 

Mrs. Lange traces the divorce evil to "this seclusion of 
women." In the first class of married women wage-earners, those 
forced into the breach, I have known of practically no happy 
marriages aud a great many divorces. It may be foolish, "in- 
herited feeling," but to my mind it goes deeper than that, and 
resolves itself into the elementary attributes of the Bases — at 
any rate, you will find that when a woman discovers thai she 
commands a better price than her husband in the commercial 
world, that she is a better wage-earner, her respect and admira- 
tion for her husband declines, and the decline most frequently 
leads to the divorce courts. Where, oh, where, are the married 
women supported and restrained of the right to earn .1 living 
by tyrant man? Marshal them out, and I'll match yon any num- 
ber lit' tired, bitter, discontented married women tiers 
whip will rhreri'ully trade places with them. One of them 
in me this very morning: "Women should thank God thai I 
are men with natural pride enough to wish to provide for their 
wives. The university professor's wife calls it 'prejudice, 
pride and inherited feeling 1 for a man to prefer that his ■■■ 
should not become n wage-earner. All the « 
I Imow are looking for jusl that sort of man!" 

I fancy that when the pjood wives of the university prof 
threshed out the bud separated the wheat from the chaff, 

and let the sunlight of their fancy play upon the golden wheat — 
the choice positions open to women, the positions which only tal- 
ent or educational advantages, or social preferment mi 
Bible. They saw the world deprived of a great singer, physician, 
professor, actress, lawyer, writer, scient t. or painter, 

because of this "prejudice" against married women becoming 

e-earners. But do not show that the majority 

married women wage-earners are engaged in pursuits akin 
those named. They belong to the second and comparatil 
infinitely smaller group into which I have divided the married 
wage-earni 

among married women exercising s talent outsid homi and 

motherhood is rather lar_ 1 not see how even using this 

II and superior group as evil may be 

1 lusion of women in hoi 

\- :^r the majority of married women wag their 

set in such pleasant places. T 
an alteration hand in one of our departroei 3 was 

a pretty young girl with a irrammai • duration when she 

married the "gentleman" who has failed to support her. but 
put 1 He will not 



do anything but clerical work, and must be of indifferent value, 
as he is not employed half the time. She was supposed to be a 
"grand piano player" in her set, but she soon found when she 
tried to put it to commercial use that she could not turn it into 
account. She has two children — boys — whose clothes she pains- 
takingly learned to make, and now while they are in school or 
play on the streets, she puts that knowledge to use altering gar- 
ments. She is what is known as a "helper," not being expert 
or trained enough to have charge of a department, aud for her 
services from 8 in the morning until 6 at night she receives 
$1.75. She is thirty, and looks forty-live. Her religious scru- 
ples prevent divorce. This is not an isolated, exaggerated case — 
the fact that she has steady employment, and that her husband 
is not abusive, would make her lot seem enviable to many a 
married woman wage-earner. 

Mrs. Meyer E. Jaffa, the wife of another university professor, 
is quoted as saying: "It matters not that women are lonesome 
and neglected. Some unwritten law decrees that the married 
woman must be a hermit when her family is away, or else plunge 
into some social dissipation which injures nerves and under- 
mines health." Mrs. Jaffa has a remarkable nose for scenting 
out "unwritten laws." In what territory did she discover the 
"hermit" handwriting on the wall? It is a startling statement, 
and one which 1 fancy she would have great difficulty 111 estab- 
lishing. There are doubtless "hermit" wives, but there is no law, 
written or unwritten, to chain them to 1l1.1t -late. The Ameri- 
can public guarantees the American wile lite, liberty aud the 
pursuit of happiness. 

The University professor is over-paid — it 1- 

whether he is paid enough. Moreover, tin ictiona and 

fulfillments of Bocial obligations which tax his income more 
sorely than the skilled laborer receiving the same wage, lie 
must maintain a creditable educate 

ordance with his own acad . ami clothe the en- 

tire family reepei the professor's wife has 

to help pull tho ends bo make them meet. It 1- not Burpi 

ore, that in open debate th I that "married women 

cannot in this 
enlighti nj question about thi on in cer- 

tain circumstances. However, tin- faculty ladies go further ami 
do not set down any circun I. But I 

is tho amazing part of it all. They imply that th 

a strong cabal among nun to prevent married women fro 
coming wage-earners. Now, I that if "the good wife 

of the University professor looked tin 
she would find that she, herself, 

a wage-earner. She would find th.' same 
"prejudice, false pride and inherit) ; And if she- 
went about it honestly, she would probably discover that she had 
"no class" a- a wage-earner: that I, yellow certificate to 
school was wort] n"t being unusually- 
gifted in any of the arts at d em- 
ployment 111111I1 more congenial or pro ration 
hand in the shop. 

Unquestionably married » _■ wage 

liners. But their hnsbandi 
1 over what due they 1 



You can ride in a car from a point on Long Island to a 

point i; nder two 1 

great city. But have patience. The time is coming wh' 1 

may go from the Atlantic to ti y the all-,; 



&f HARTSHORN ^_ 
l m SHADE ROLLERS W 

WW Bear th* script nam* of . ™ 

#■ Stewart Har'sh-wrf of) labeL J\ 

™ ■» Get "Improv*pl." no lacks re-;u **1 M ^ 



Bear •I-.e script dint of 
S*e»a 



Get "Improved. 

Wood Rollers 



on UbeL 
00 tacks r* 

Tla Rollers 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 




The annual dinner of the Corinthian Yacht Club at tin- 
clubhouse at Belvedere, where they hied themselves this New 
Year's, 1910, was a most memorable affair. As of yore, the 
pet bear greeted them — but in a different way — this time done 
to a turn and steaming hot in gravy. The bear, you see, had not 
only partaken of the pet monkey, and the pet coon, but actually- 
hugged one of the members into thoughts of the hereafter, which, 
however impossible it may seem, it must be admitted was some- 
thing of a hug. At the eating of him, however, regret reigned 
on all sides, and many were the condolences and "fare-thee-wells" 
meted out. 

"A little of the shank, please," said Judge Wm. P. Lawlor, 
dropping a tear on his plate. "He had a pretty limb." 

"And I — a little of the heart,'-' spoke Judge John Van Nos- 
trand. "He had a good heart."' 

"But the giblets are not ready, sir," he was told. 

"Do not speak of them as giblets," reproved the Judge, gently. 
"Our little bear, you must remember, was no goose." 

"I'll admit, sir, that he was no foul." 

"As for me," broke in Henry Dimond, "I'll have some of the 
meat around the ribs." 

"Any particular rib?" he was asked. 

"Well, not the. fifth rib, not the fifth rib," advised Dimond, 
carefully. "I am afraid, perhaps, that I've had too much of 
the fifth rib at times. Hem !" 

But every one was too much engrossed in filling their finger- 
bowls with tears to notice in what manner their fellow member 
had slipped. 

"For my part," put in Commodore Frank Stone, "I'll have a 
little of the rump. Ah, many's the time I've spanked him, the 
little sweetheart!" 

"Then it will be pounded rump steak," thrust the server, 
maliciously. "And you, Senator, what can I give you — a little 
of the shoulder? Or would it be too strong? It wasn't you he 
hugged." 

"No, it wasn't," responded Senator Sims, indignantly. "A 
little of the shoulder — yes, that will do." 

The Senator was served amid a Niagara pause. But the set - < 
again put his boat out recklessly in the current. 

"Haven't some of you the courage to ask for the pel monkey 
or the coon he ate?" he asked with modesty. 

But the effort was lost on the bereaved crowd. 

Bising to his feet majestically, and ignoring the server en- 
tirely, Port Captain John H. Keefe announced with due solem- 
nity that he had an epitaph to recite over the dead. Then while 
heads bowed themselves, he gave vent to the following: 

''Though death doth bear our little bear 

Away from us, 'tis meet 
We bare his bones to show we care 

For that is also meat." 
* * * 

A broken heart sometimes leads to strange things and where- 
abouts. Leo B. Westcott, the young collegian who followed 
Billie B., the adorable, to Seattle, and was inclined to follow 
her to the ends of the earth so that his parental keepers had to 
come to the rescue, is now installed as a "supe" at the Alcazar 
Theatre. Let us hope that "The College Widow" will teach 
him something, as widows have taught some of us before. At 
the same time, the magnanimity of young Westcott endeavor- 
ing to contribute to our amusement while engulfed in the despair 
of a divine and insatiable passion, is not to be overlooked. If 
he would make a hit, however — a roaring fa'ree of it — we would 
advise him to put on as curtain-raiser "the divine and insatiable 
passion." It is a long time since we have had any real good 
burlesque in San Francisco. Ah, those kid loves! Miss Billie 
Burke must have trampled on a thousand of them in her time, 
but her smile is all the more piquant for it. And yet they are 



things of beauty in a way, and not to be laughed at. Till he 
meets a second fate in some fat Venus of the chorus, our young 
lover will doubtless be able to hold sacred his tragedy. And he 
may later pardon himself with the thought that he is not the 
only man who ended by holding a chorus girl, and that some- 
where and somehow some one else may be holding the adorable 
Billie. For if that charming young lady was not made for love 

we miss our guess and remembrance of her. 

* * * 

Even San Quentin did not spoil the comedy of life for George 
Best, the actor. Life within the grey prison walls he spun in 
web of laughter, too, and taught his comrades the art. As a 
result, the New Year dramatic presentation at the prison was 
;i decided success. In fact, so many old-time Thespians ap- 
peared on the boards that San Quentin, with its bars and its 
high walls might well be considered a farce. And now George 
Best is out — into the sweep of the wide world and the sunshine 
again — and commissioned to play a part with Kolb and Dill. 

Mr. Dill's reception of him, as it is told, was rather Dill-like. 
They met in the lobby of the St. Francis Hotel. 

"Hello, Best," said Dill. "If you're looking for a cell, take 
I lie elevator — any floor." 

"Nothing doing," retorted Best. "I was looking for a villain 
and found him." 

"I'll have you know," rejoined Dill, "that I am a lion 'In 
Africa.'" 

"All the better reason that I should hunt you, then," laughed 

Best. 

* * * 

One of the two hundred was speaking to Ned Greenway about 
his proposed trip to Europe. Ponderous and elegant in his 
chair, Mr. Greenway sat and smiled in perspective. 

"But what are you going for?" asked the lady, inquisitively. 
"Aii- you not satisfied with yourself. Don't you think, Mr. 
Greenway, that such a/ trip at fifty will call attention to the fact 
that you never have been abroad?" 

The dictator sat up with dignity, showing dangerously his 
beautiful., manicured fingernails. "Perhaps I haven't," he said, 
'"perhaps I haven't. There are some things, you see, that even 

Europe has missed." 

* * * 

There's danger in blossoms, for sometimes blossoms lead to 
a woman, and a woman leads God knows where. Let us hope, 
however, that the pretty romance of Miss Charlotto Case and 
Professor H. M. Hall, both of the University of California, 
which recently came to light, will lead straight to Heaven, or 
thai 1 leaven-kissing hill, to which Bill Shakespeare has referred 
us. Nbl only the romance in its botanical setting is delightful, 
but the young lady shows a courage that i- to be commended. 
While every lass will brighten for a sailor, it is not every young 
woman who could love a professor. 




Piano 



The choice of the Worlds' 
Greatest Prima Donna. 

Madame Marcella Sem- 
brich, both in concert and 
private life. 



The 



lal&uiin 



Piano 



Recipient of the Worlds' Highest Honors at all International 
Expositions. Should be your choice. 

S%$a(SuiinGl0. 

MANUFACTURERS 
Pacific Coast Headquarters: 3 lO Sutter St. near Grant Ave.. S. F. 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



The Society for the Suppression of News is still nourishing 
in the daily press; likewise in the Police Department. Hence 
the fact that an incident of local militant politicE has not been 
published to the world, although it'was piquant. The two Lead- 
ing parts were taken by John J. Sweeney, lately of the Play- 
ground Commission, and A. Y. Yoell, of the Asiatic Exclusion 
League. The former's antipathy to P. 11. McCarthy, and the 
latter's loyalty to the Mayor, are well known. Sweeney and 
Yoell are not harmonious. A few days ago Sweeney met Yoell 
and addressed him in language which was, to say the least, rude 
and unkind. Charley Curry, who was with Yoell, advised 
Sweeney to behave himself. There was no further unpleasantness 
that day, but two days later, Sweeney met Yoell in the elevator 
at the Humboldt Bank building. There hostilities were re- 
newed, culminated in a swift jolt by Sweeney's left upon Y r oell's 
jaw. Yoell did not take count, but when he rose to retaliate, 
Sweeney was gone. No warrants. No arrests. No news items. 

This is genteel politics. 

* * * 

We read regularly in the daily papers accounts of sailors be- 
ing seriously injured and even killed by falling from aloft upon- 
sailing vessels lying in port. Such accidents rarely happen at 
sea_ although at sea the vessel is generally pitching and rolling. 
The accidents are in most cases due to the brutality of the officers 
of the ship, who order the men aloft regardless of their condi- 
tion at the time. It is a regrettable fact that deep-water sailors, 
after their long voyages, often drink heavily during the run 
ashore upon reaching port. When they return to the ship, they 
are generally shaky, nervous and uncertain of eye, foot and hand. 
Nevertheless, a cruel mate will order these men to ascend to per- 
ilous stations aloft, where nervousness is apt to make them lose ' 
their footing or their grasp, and they fall to the deck. It is bad 
enough for the sailor himself to get drunk. It is worse for hia 
officers to take advantage of his unfortunate condition and order 
him aloft, at the peril of his life, before he has sufficiently re- 
covered his nerve. There are plenty of jobs around the decks 

where he can be utilized until fit to go aloft in safety. 

* * * 

There is cause for regret in the impending detachment of 
Commander E. W. Eberle, U. S. Navy, from the command of 
the Naval Training Station at Goat Island, which takes place 
on January 20th. During his incumbency of this important 
post, he has shown marked executive ability, and has also made 
many friends and admirers by the tact with which he has repre- 
sented the navy on many public occasions in this city. There 
was a high compliment paid him when he. only a commander, 
was placed in charge of the training station, which lias hitherto 
been directed by a captain or a rear-admiral. Bui Eberle is a 
sea-going officer, ami prefers sea duly to shore duty. He was 
one of the officers of i he battleship Oregon in 1898, ami from his 

turret, was fired the final shot which brought-to il"' I ' ! ' 

t'olun, (he las! of the Spanish ships to be d 

of Santiago, lie will he succeeded ley Captain John B, Milton, 

another popular officer, now at Mare Island oayy-yard. 

* * * 

The City Hall cat is prehistoric and quite a joker, T 
was sitting on a pile of junk the other night when a Tom-cat 
came up and started some Love-making. 

"Have you ever read 'The Firing Line?' " he asked tentatively, 
referring to Robert Chamber's hook — for lie was an educated 
Tom. 

"\o." returned the cat, "hut I have seen it illustrated." 

"You have '." be echoed in del 

"'lis; James 1'. Phelan has just > - _ i park rommis- 

ner." 



Being on the milk wagon and being on the water wagon, 

mean pretty nearly the same thing. 



No matter how much applause the chorus 

always gol a kick i oming. 



e. n. cociivoisii-n. 



Art Dealer, Frame Maker. New store, 431 Sutler street, be- 
tween Stockton and Powell. 



\ 



Pears' 

Pears' is essentially 
a toilet soap. A soap 
good for clothes won't 
benefit face and hands. 
Don't use laundry soap 
for toilet or bath. That 
is, if you value clear 
skin. 

Pears' is pure soap 
and matchless for the 
complexion. 

Sold in town and village 




CURES 



/ 



•HEADACHES 

iotas'?, so* seiqp Bottles^ 



^1 



Wedding Pi - st tits.— The cho I from at 

Marsh's, who is now permanently Located at Post and I 

. also at Fairmont Hotel. 




Oar mw studio is now complete. Let in 

show you oar method of predentin* lighting 

schemes. 



Lighting 
Fixtures 

The Enos Company 

G I ROE.se ii Miiunr 



334 Suttrr Si Altai Am BMf.. 

Sta Fra*d»c» 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8. J 910. 




■"** 



'tfWNCREfL 



,'Qaeffiat mffjblar&vBniJlj^aiJ&youf' .**"'* i\ : 

" ' i \ *rr"iVni* 



Superioi Judge Mogan refused 10 consider the cross com- 
plaint in a divorce action tiled in the courts last week on the 
ground that the diction resembled poetry, and that poetry has 
no place in the divorce courts. It is cruel of the judge to close 
the divorce courts to poets. It shows a lack of historical sympa- 
thy with poets as a class. For years, when it was not respectable 
for persons to seek divorces nor to confess their marital misfor- 
tunes in public, the poets and their wives, through conjugal in- 
felicities, kept the divorce tradition alive in England, France 
and Germany. It has been a notorious fact that literary men- 
poets, if you like — have been unhappily married, or, to be more 
precise, their wives have been. Why, J udge Mogan, there might 
not exist any divorce law if it had not been for the poets. 

Now there is an effort to break the fish trust. The toilers 

of the sea have been incorporating all the creatures of the deep 
into their bank books. It has been presumed by persons not 
familiar with trade methods in the United States that fish were 
the common property of the people, and that any one with skill 
and enterprise enough to go out and drop a line iuto the ocean 
was entitled to all that he couid catch. Of course, such is not 
the case. No one is entitled to catch fish who does not belong 
to the fish trust. The seas belong to the small coterie of men 
who think they would like to charge triple prices for the spoils 
of their nets. The anti-trust people have filed a suit in the 
courts, but what good can that dor 

Coach Schaeffer, of the University of California Kugby 

football team, which went north and was defeated by the Van- 
couver Club, is hollering to the effect that the Blue and Gold 
was "robbed"' of the decision in the contest. If football coaches 
cannot stop such tactics they had better leave the game or the 
colleges should stop playing. It is all right for a team to con- 
tend for its rights, during the contest, or in a formal and digni- 
fied way afterward, but for a member of the team or its coach to 
make ugly accusations is bad sportsmanship. Professional prize- 
fighters have a habit of doing that sort of thing when they can, 
but there is some difference between them and college boys, or 
should be. 

The new unsinkable target which the United States navy 

has been using in Manila w-aters has gone down to Davy Jones's 
locker. The target was thought to be hedged about with such 
divinity in the way of air chambers, armor plate and a •$15,000 
price tag that it would bear up under any amount of lire. But 
it could not resist the blandishments of the shells hurled at it by 
the American jackets, and on courting those projectiles it i arm: 
to grief. Anyway, what is the good of a naval gun that cannot 
sink a mechanism, be it rival vessel or target, that is warranted 
not to sink ? 

As a compendium of representative business men, the 

citizens' committee of ways and means for the Panama Pacific 
Fair is about as suavely arranged a list as could be secured. Prac- 
tically every trade is represented. Millionaire and "retail liquor 
dealer," the euphemism for saloonkeeper, are bracketed on the 
list. Democracy screams from the housetops in joy and victory 
when the list marches by toward the temple of fame. It is a 
good list, a darn good list ; you can't beat it for its scope. That 
I may seem to smile at it is but a tender expression of con- 
gratulation of the committee on its classy work. 

Ethics among highwaymen seems to have changed. In 

the good old days of the hero robbers, the clergy of the town ci- 
ders were never robbed. A bishop often fell afoul of the sturdy 
Eobin Hood, and a fat abbe, riding his white mule and with his 
saddle bags filled with the profits of indulgences, as they would 
say, frequently met with the bowmen in green, and was relieved 
of his sacred valuables. But a parson — never. Yet only last 
Sunday night did San Francisco thugs lay wanton hands mi the 
person of a parson and take a goodly purse from him. Dear me, 
what has become of romance. Say ! 



Here is a problem in professional ethics. When a crimi- 
nal comes to a lawyer, he is supposed to shield him in every way, 
even though he knows the man to be guilty. When the Alameda 
County highwayman went to a doctor in San Jose, on Monday 
last, and had several bullet wounds, inflicted by a sheriff's posse, 
dressed, he took the precaution to have a companion with him 
who could keep the doctor covered with a gun while the dressing 
was attended to. Now% if a criminal is safe from the law in the 
hands of a lawyer, why should he not be safe when he is in the 
hands of a doctor? There should be professional courtesy in 
the learned professions, and a reciprocity. Leave the uncovering 
d( crime to newspaper reporters. They enjoy the exercise. 

It is a tolerable easy thing to elect a President or a 

Mayor by popular vote, but when it comes to electing a national 
song by the same method the futility of what Professor Eowison 
calls "seeking to arrive at truth by counting noses" is clearly 
demonstrated. By the correspondence school method some digni- 
tary in Washington has decided that "Dixie"' is the most popular, 
anil therefore the national song of the United States. "Yankee 

I IIl'" is second. .Dixie is a splendid air, but while there are 

men living, who used to shoot their muskets toward any band 
in grey that played that air, it can scarcely arise to the distinc- 
tion of being our national song. 

Two young men who. I am told, are all in all in society, 

have started a new diversion for the fashionable folk. It is the 
dietary innovation of a New Year's day breakfast served to their 
friends. There are two conspicuous merits in such an entertain- 
ment. The hosts can establish an assured social position for the 
year to come by being foremost in the ranks of the entertainers 
of the twelvemonth, and the young men who are invited to the 
bountiful spread must conduct themselves on the night preceding 
the feast witli such decorum that they will be up in time for the 
noon-day feast and with digestive apparatus in shape to assimi- 
late (lie menu. 

The military order issued by Major William W. Forsyth, 

commandant of the Yosemite National Park, in effect that no 
cats are to be permitted within the confines of the reservation, will 
not be taken as a personal affront, I trust, by pumas, wild-cats, 
. mountain lions and nther more aristocratic members of the feline 
family. As I understand the order, Major Forsyth aims solely 
at the domestic cat, the one which may lie carried in a hand bas- 
ket. Other cats, of course, are encouraged to remain in the val- 
ley. Since no firearms are permitted, there is one of tin- few 
places where the wildcat and his larger cousins can bask in 
security. 

With the growth of the city, there is a growing neighbor- 
hood sentiment, which is not only healthy in itself, but which 
indirectly gives the city the greater opportunity to become met- 
ropolitan. Heretofore the whole city lias been called upon to 
velelirate the opening of a public school house or the closing of 
a swamp in some far Western section of the city. Now there is 
a neighborhood spirit which will attend to those things, and a 
neighborhood newspaper press which will extol] the glories of 
the public work and leave the dty papers more space for murder 
stories. 



Boord's "Twilight" 

THE PERFECTION OF DRY GINS 

OLD TOM 

DRY (square bottle) and 
SLOE GINS 
ORANGE BITTERS 

ALL "CAT ON BARREL" BRAND 
FROM 

BOORD & SON 

London. England 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 



Januaby 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




$ 



IWKE'SUND 




no, ^-j^a^^w 

By Paul Gerson. 

"The Alaskan" at the Savoy. 

Gus Weinberg and Richard Carroll, who are featuring them- 
selves in this musical comedy offering, have taken it in hand and 
accomplished wonders in the way of revising and improving, un- 
til the present performance shows a change for the better 
throughout. Locally, we seem to have had our fill of musical 
comedy, and from reports, the end seems in sight, and with 
Shakespeare we will say "for this relief much thanks." We have 
had during the past few months every conceivable kind of musi- 
cal offering, good, bad and indifferent, some of them, in fact, 
the worst concoctions and excuses that this long suffering com- 
munity has had to put up with in a decade. Either managers 
nowadays lack discretion and judgment, or they imagine that the 
public will stand for anything that bears the imprint of musical 
comedy. We do not include in this latter classification "The 
Alaskan," which is really a bright and tuneful and out of the 
ordinary comedy with music, and Carroll and Weinberg are two 
genuine comedians. The environment of the play adds a great 
deal of color, and furthermore it allows all- concerned to get 
away from many of the decided conventionalities of the ordinary 
musical comedies, for which many thanks. Alaska, the scene of 
the play, is hitherto untrodden territory in a musical way, 
though Rex Beach and others have brought this mystic and won- 



derful country into prominence with their plays. The present 
performance moves with considerable briskness, though the cos- 
tuming of the Far North does not afford many opportunities in 
the way of the usual attempts at color schemes, though at the 
same time the habiliments of the frozen north are decidedly 
picturesque. The plot of the play is on a par with other musical 
offerings, and its development will never cause mental derange- 
ment. The music is fairly good, two or three of the numbers be- 
ing unusually jingly. Carroll and Weinberg naturally have the 
big parts of the piece, and furnish most of the laughs. They are 
both legitimate comedians old at this kind of game, and as they 
have a personal interest in the success of the performance, they 
naturally give their audiences the best there is in them. John 
Phillips is a good-looking tenor who can act surprisingly well, 
and enters into his role with splendid spirit. He is ably sec- 
onded by a bariton gentleman with the eiiphonious name of Det- 
mar Poppen. Detmar is a large gentleman with a very good 
voice, but is not much of an actor. Harry Hoffman is particu- 
larly good as Sad Sandy, showing much unctious humor, making 
a great deal of a small part. Among the women, Jessie Stoner 
shows the way. She is an attractive looking person with a fair 
singing voice, and shows much capability as an actress. She is 
conscientious and painstaking. Etta Lockhart is satisfactory 
in a sort of secondary sonbrette part, and there arc a number of 
ladies who have roles of more or less importance alloted tn them, 
who perform in a satisfactory manner. The scenery is pretty, 
and the electrical effects novel, and the stage management all 
that could be asked. "The Alaskan" is really worth seeing. 

* * * 

We had occasion in our review of Ezra Kendall last week to 
remark on the slipshod methods this gentleman was using in his 
performance, and the rank injustice he was doing his audiences 
who have been loval to him for manv years. We understand that 




The Wolf." Kugen, ' >uerful play of French Canadian Life, at the Savoy Theatre. 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



in both Portland and Seattle the theatre was closed on account of 
Mr. Kendall's inebriety. Since his local engagement, we learn 
that his managers, becoming disgusted with his habits, have can- 
celled his tour. This is to be regretted on account of the mem- 
bers of his company, who are all ladies and gentlemen of ster- 
ling qualities. 

* * * 

"The College Widow" at the Alcazar. 

George Ade, the author of this play, has learned a great deal 
about the technique of playwriting since he penned "The Col- 
lege Widow." The plot is about as thin as the usual musical 
comedy plot, and we half suspect that Ade intended to set it to 
music when he wrote it. It is, however, an enjoyable entertain- 
ment in its present form, and he has brought out a few types and 
characters that are decidedly novel and unique, and vastly amus- 
ing. Though seen here before, and by a stock company, the play 
still has good drawing powers, which has been attested by the 
generous patronage given the Alcazar players. The various 
characters do not draw very heavily on the personal ability of 
any of the company; in fact, the leading members have a very 
limited opportunity to do much of anything. Miss Vaughan 
and Mr. Ince do all that is asked of them in a conscientious, 
though somewhat conventional manner, though as stated, the 
roles allotted them allow but poor scope for their undoubted 
ability. Bennison is very good as Silent Murphy, and extracts 
a whole lot of good, clean comedy out of the part. We like Ben- 
nison. as it is evident he cannot do anything badly. He is too 
conscientious and earnest. Walling was quite good as Hiram 
Bolton, as was Hickman as the Hon. Elam Hicks. Clark played 
his son, the role he has done "before, and it is one of the best 
things we have seen Clark do. Al. Watson, a new-comer, was 
Matty McGowan, the trainer, and he was most satisfactory. Far- 
jeon was rather conventional in his methods as Peter Wither- 
spoon. Trowbridge was surprisingly good as the coach, and this 
chap should be given an opportunity in the future, because he 
seems to have the right kind of mettle in him. Roy Neil] was also 
good in a character comedy role of which he made a great deal. 
He is also another youngster who has a very promising future. 





Mrs.. Frederic VoeXker, who will appear in the Musical In- 
terlude, "Twilight in the Studio," this Sunday matinee at the 
Urpheum. 



Harry Lauder, the famous Scotch comedian, whose appear- 
ances at Dreamland next week are the talk of the community. 

Both Garwood and Baldwin are clever in their roles, in fact the 
minor members of the company seem- to have their inning this 
work, and they have all more than fulfilled expectations. Grace 
Travers does again the part of the athletic girl we have seen her 
in before. She is simply splendid, investing the role with lots 
of ginger and zest. Dear little Bessie Barriscale is simply in- 
imitable as Plora Wiggins, and succeeds in making the part ex- 
tremely funny and getting all the comedy possible out of this 
quaint characterization. There are a number of small parts all 
in competent hands. The college students and the various group- 
ings are fair, the college fellows looking more like youngsters 
just entering high school than seasoned collegians. The scenery 
is pretty throughout, and in perfect accord. 

* * « 

The Orpheum. 

This popular vaudeville house is sailing merrily along the 
top wave of prosperity these days, seats being almost at a prem- 
ium. Theatre-goers are a discerning lot, after all. and whenever 
a good bill is the rule at this house, packed houses are always in 
evidence. The present bill, as a whole, is one of general excel- 
lence, there being several numbers that are particularly good. The 
programme is initiated with "Pox and Foxie's Circus." This 
supposedly stupendous aggregation consists of two small dogs and 
a cat. The other part of this enormous organization is composed 
of Pox himself and a lady assistant. The former supplies vir- 
tually all of the comedy of the act; the latter tries to look pretty 
and to enhance the scenic embellishments. It is a good act, full 
of wholesome nonsense, and is very enjoyable. The Brothers 
Permane are next in a little divertissement in which clowning 
is the principal feature. Their ludicrous attempts at English 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



11 




Margaret Dale, who appears with Wm. H. Crane, in George 
Ada's best comedy, "Father and the Boys" at the new Columbia 
Theatre, beginning Monday night, January Wth. 

proclaims their foreign extraction, and their act is decidedly 

novel, their antics with a huge rubber ball is quite funny, and 
they introduce an innovation by bounding the ball into the audi- 
ence, who arc allowed to retain possession of it for some time 
and play catch with each other to the intense amusement of 
everybody concerned. They end their act with a stunt they call 
"Nightingales making love," which is extremely funny. They 
certainly furnish an entertaining twenty minutes. They are 
followed by Belle Davis and her young colored assistants. Miss 
Davis is evidently a Creole and is rather prepossessing in ap- 
pearance. She has the faculty of allowing her assistants to do 
more than three-fourths of her act; in fact, the lady in question 
could be eradicated altogether, and if anything, it would im- 
prove the act, as she is without doubt the weakest member of the 
lot. They are a clever lot of pickaninnies who enter into their 
work with a zest and zip that is positively amusing. They add 
to the programme just that element of change which aids in 
building up an ideal vaudeville bill. The first part of the pro- 
gramme is closed with Franklyn Underwood and Miss Slosson. 
and a Mr. Davies, in their one-act comedy which they call 
•'Dobbs" Dilemma." which they have done here before, and which 
everybody knows is a deliberate steal from "Mrs. Temple's 
gram." They are fairly amusing, but it is about time that they 
provided themselves with another vehicle, and something or . 
we trust. 

The HcNaughtons open the second half of the bill. They are 
two English actors with a lively accent, and their act savors of the 



English music halls. They are clever fellows, though, and in 
spite of the fact that they are absolutely English in their meth- 
ods, their act is highly entertaining. We are then introduced to 
the supposed big feature of the programme, another English im- 
portation from the music halls. Miss Alice Lloyd. We must 
candidly confess to a distinct disappointment in connection with 
Miss Lloyd. True, she has a most engaging personality, a rather 
pretty face, and a stunning figure which she exhibits as far as 
the law allows. She sings in a high, shrill voice, and no doubt 
realizing her deficiencies in this respect, she talks her songs 
whenever the opportunity affords. She of course does the old 
trick of singling out an auditor and making him the butt of 
her pleasantries, and works the mirror reflection act, for which 
she claims originality. Her act takes, and she has a certain 
amount of magnetism and some catchy songs and several changes 
of costume, but beyond this we fail to see the reason for all this 
clamor, as the writer firmly believes that we have no less than 
eleven thousand and sixty-six American girls who are just as 
clever and engaging as Miss Lloyd. However, the fact remains 
that she is an immense drawing card, and we must therefore bow 
to popular approval and wish the little lady continued success. 
She is followed by the "Basque Grand Opera Quartet," com- 
posed of three foreign gentlemen and one American lady. They 
give selections from well-known operas, as well as a couple of 
popular ballads. Their voices harmonize very well, and they add 
a pleasing number to a well-stocked programme. The bill is 
closed by the Klein family, trick cyclists. We have had bicycle 
acts without number, but this one is without question one of the 
cleverest that we have ever witnessed. One of the number carries 
the burden of the comedy, and is really funny. Altogether it is 
really a remarkably good act. Some good moving pictures com- 
pletes one of the best Orpheum bills seen tor some time. It is the 
high water mark of excellence, and the house deserves in full 
measure the unparalleled splendid patronage it is enjoying. 

(Continued I" Page U.) 



New Alcazar Theatre* 



rner Sutter and Steiner Street* 
Phone W«t 1400 
Balasco and Mayer, Owners and Managers. Absolutely "Class A" Building. 

Week commencing Mnn.iny, .Tummry U'lth, the dramatic sensation 
<if the season, 

ST. ELMO, 
Adapted by Willani Kolcomb from Augusta J. Bvuns- Wilson's 
famous novel of the same title Only authorized version. 
Prices — Night, 25c. to SI. Matinee, -'">< to 50c. Matinee Saturday 
and Sunday. 



Savoy Theatre 

McAllister, near Market. 



Phones Market i]0 
Home J »8« 



New 



This Saturday afternoon and evening. Last times <•( THE ALAS- 
KAN. Starting Sunday matinee. January 9th. Other matinees 
Thursday and Saturday. 

THE WOLF. 
A play of the Canadian Hudson Bay country, by Eugene Walter, 
author of "Paid In Full" »nd "The Easiest Way." 
Prices, from 25c. to $1.50. Thursday matinee, 25c. 50c. and 75c. 

Seats at the theat re and Emporium. 
Next— BREWSTER'S MILLIONS. 

Or7)hPMTYL OFarrell Street. 

\SI jJlVK/VijIIV Bet 8tockton anj p 0W ell. 

SafeA lad Mo<! Mafnifiernt Thratre in America. 
"Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

A WONDERFUL NEW BILL. 
ARTURO BERNARDI "The Great Italian Protean Artist:" WILLY 
PAXTZER TROUPE; I'NA CLAYTON & CO.! MR and MRS. 
VOELKER: BASQI'E GRANT) OPERA QUARTETTE; BELLE 
DAVIS AND HER CRACKERJACKS; FOX & POXTES CIRCUS: 
NEW ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES. First time here of H. Glt- 
tus Lonesdales Comedietta. "THINGS ARE SELDOM WHAT 
THET SEEM." presented by FRANKLYN UNDERWOOD AND 
FRANCES SLOSSON. 

Evening prices 10c.. 25c. 50c. 75c. Box seats. $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays) 10c . 25c. 50c Phone Douglas 70. 



Columbia Theatre §E° ; 



Geary and Mason Sts. 
Marx & Co.. Manager*. 
Phone Franklin 150. 
Inaugural attraction. Two weeks, beginning Monday. January 10th. 
Matinees "Wednesdays and Saturdays. Charles Frohman presents 

WM. H. CRANE, 
in his greatest laughing success. "FATHER AND THE BOYS." 
George Ade's best and funniest comedy. "American to the 
Seats— $2. $1.50. $1. 50c.. 25c. 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS ATI 
AND GROVE STREET. 
Phona Markat 90a 
Two weeks starting Monday night January 10th. Matinee Saturday. 

OLGA NETHERSOLE. 
in her new American Drama, THE WRITING ON THE WALL. 
Second week — Miss Nethersole m a repertoire of her successes. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januauy 8, 1910. 




SvT^" 



^CIETX 




The man who insists that cold roast beef is not "strictly speak- 
ing, a breakfast dish." has suffered geographical limitations. He 
has broken his morning fast anywhere Erom the great pie-bell 
to the lamb chops, beef-steak, ham and eggs across the Gfreal 
Divide, but he has never waded through the pond to help him- 
self from the cold joint on the English sideboard. What is 
proper in one country is eccentric gastronomy in another. But 
in the matter of habiliment the European nations do not preseni 
such startling differences as we exhibit. By the time the dinner 
gong rings, all Continental society comes forth in just about the 
same shade of make-up — conventional evening dress, fn Lon- 
don, even the landlady of the modest boarding-house would 
rather serve you to a second helping of holiday pudding than 
appear in a short skirt at the dinner hour. In the smart hotels, 
a high neck gown is explained only on the score of some dis- 
figurement which makes concealment necessary. But out here 
the laws and the climate are so flexible that they bend at a touch. 
and as a result one is always sure of seeing sealskins and straw 
hats in July, and tailor snits and decollete gowns at the Janu- 
ary supper parties. 

When the New Year says howdy-do to these people by the 
Western sea, we sit up and acknowledge the presentation in a 
manner quite our own. New York has begun to copy n-, and it 
may be that the rest of the world will some day use the same 
formula of welcome that has grown up out here. But meantime, 
we must grope around in the dark as to just what is the proper 
thing to wear to the christening party of the baby year. People 
who have spent much time abroad and can wear evening clothes 
as nonchalantly as it rains in London, have not a precedent to 
lean on in the matter of this New Year frolic. Indeed, T noticed 
(hat the people who could go to the head of the elass on European 
customs were frocked in defiance of the Continental law. Kath- 
leen de Young and her sisters, Mrs. George Cameron and Mrs. 
Joe Tobin, came into the Palace in severe tailor suits, with smart 
turban hats. Prances Stewart, who was at their table, was like- 
wise gowned in a costume that would have been very proper for 
a morning shopping tour. Mrs. Rudolph Spreckels and her 
guests eschewed conventional evening dress, and there were any 
number of others who considered that a public carnival welcome 
of the New Year did not justify evening dress. The Xewhalls 
were conspicuous among those who solved the problem by wear- 
ing high-neck evening ".owns. As one girl put it, "the shorter 
the skirt the longer the social position; the lower the neck the 
steeper the climb into society." It was noticeable that those 
who, in the horticulture of the smart set, are botanieallv classed 
as the common or garden variety of climbing plants, showed the 
richest foliage. The climbers appeared in magnificent ball- 
gowns, and for sartorial sensations one could not look to the 
Rlingum set. Mrs. Andrew Welsh was the chief merry-maker 
among the Blingumites who gathered at the Palace — Burlingamc 
on parade takes its pleasures rather dully, conscious always that 
others are looking. 

Cupid is up for membership in the Ananias Club, and with 
Dr. Cook backing him, is sure to be elected. His manufactured 
fabrications about the affairs of Mrs. Prank Norris and Prank 
Preston have been proven as untrustworthy as the North Pole 
data. Denials and contradictions of an engagement have come 
up from Santa Barbara as regularly as the tide, but now comes 
an authoritative announcement that the wedding will be cele- 
brated while the New Year is still in long clothes. Mrs. Grundy 
tells me that the reason for the delayed acknowledgment of the 
long-suspected engagement is, that Mrs. E. P. Preston, the 
mother of the youmr man, opposed the marriage of her son and 
the clashing widow of the early lost California genius, Prank 
Norris. Mrs. Preston, as the widow cf the wealthy lawyer, Col. 
Preston, inherited his large fortune, which she holds 'in trust 
for her children. The son by Colonel Preston's first wife threat- 
ened suit to break the will, but the case was compromised. Mrs. 
Preston is, therefore, the financial head of the family. She had 
not planned to have her son marry outside of her own set, but 



PALACE HOTEL 

In these two hotels San Francisco Society 
finds every facility for its pleasure and 
convenience. Both under management of 
Palace Hotel Company. 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 



I believe has at last been reconciled to receiving Mrs. Norris into 
the family. 

.Miss Ellen O'Sullivan and Miss Theresa Thompson are en 
route to Italy, where Miss Thompson will lie .Miss O'Sullivan's 
guest, later visiting the Comptcsse de Dampierre (Miss dc 
Guigne), at her chateau in Prance. Miss O'Sullivan is a friend 
who makes friendship a word to conjure with. Last year, she 
took a young friend from Alameda to Europe as her guest, and 
during a summer spent in Piedmont with her sister, Mrs. Sutro, 
she extended the invitation to Miss Thompson for a trip abroad. 
Miss Thompson belongs to well-known Mill Valley Thompsons. 
Her father was president of the Bohemian Club at the time of 
his death, which followed only two days after Mrs. Thompson's 
demise. The girls are all clever and have engaged in various 
vocations. Kathleen, who did newspaper work on the Call, is 
now Mrs. Charles Norris, having married a brother of Frank 
Norris. Margaret Thompson is the beauty of the family, and 
has announced her engagement to a naval officer. She spends 
much of her time with her particular chums, the Draper girls, 
whose mother has filed a suit in San Pafael that shows the white 
dove of peace a smoky gray. Therese Thompson, who sailed for 
Europe with Miss O'Sullivan, has had an important position in 
a book shop. 

The Cinderella Hall at the Palace on Thursday night saved 
the week from being rather dull. A subscription ball given by 
a comparatively few patronesses who foot the bills always ex- 
cites more exhilaration than the balls managed by one person 
with each guest paying his own way. The Cindcrellas organized 
several years ago, but went out of business for a few seasons, so 
they are very welcome back at the old stand. Just why they 
chose the name Cinderella should not mystify any one with a 
shrewd intelligence — for the same reason that a brunette child 
is appropriately called Lily or a thin man runs to striped effects 
or (he optimist chooses April for his outings. I believe Cinder- 
ella did land the Prince at a ball, which lends color to their 
claim to the name, but Cinderella did not arrive until she had 
served an apprenticeship as a kitchen maid, whereas these Cin- 
derellas w 7 ould not know how to fry water properly. The extreme 
younger set were not in great evidence at the ball, those who 
had been invited prefcring the delights of a debutante dance at 
Century Hall, where Mr. and Mrs. G. D. Bullard presented their 
daughter Marie to society. Both suppers were served at mid- 
night, so it was impossible to do the London stunt of taking in 
both, but the Cinderella ball outlasted the debutante dance by 
a couple of hours, and some of the more energetic buds got in 
a few extra turns in consequence. 



BLANCO 


9 


s 


O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS 






PHONE FRANKLIN 9 






No visitor should leave the city without seein| 


j the 


finest cafe in America. Cur new annex 


is 


now 


open. 







January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



§®dM sumdl !P®ir§©iMl tanas 



The weddings of the week were all suburban affairs. On Tues- 
day, Miss Dolly Cushing was quietly married to James Jenkins 
at the family home in San Eafael. On Wednesday, Miss de 
Fremery and David Atkins were married in Oakland, and on 
that same day, Miss Mattie Milton became the bride of Lieuten- 
ant G. F. Neal at Mare Island. 

Miss Amalia Simpson gave the largest tea of the week, enter- 
taining several hundred guests in her Pacific avenue home. Mrs. 
Walter Remington Quick was a bridge hostess on Wednesday, 
and on Thursday Miss Corinne Dillman gave a luncheon at the 
Palace in compliment to Miss Jean Tyson and Miss Ha Sonntag. 
Otherwise there was very little individual entertaining during 
the week. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Harrison, of Los Angeles, registered at 
Del Monte on the 26th. Other Southern Californians at Del 
Monte for the holidays were Albert Miller, of Riverside; Thos. 
P. Mumford, of the Annandale Country Club; Mr. and Mrs. W. 
G. Hudlow, of Bakers field, and H. Spens-Bla'ck, of Porterville, 
Tulare County, who is a member of the San Francisco Golf and 
Country Club. 

A party made up of Mr. and Mrs. W. H. La Boyteaux, Miss 
Elizabeth La Boyteaux, Miss Mary S. La Boyteaux and Horace 
G. Piatt, after spending the holidays at Del Monte, returned to 
San Francisco in a Packard touring car on Sunday, going by 
way of Dumbarton to avoid the steep San Juan grade. The car 
was well provided with ropes and burlap to enable it to get over 
the soft spots. 

The Knights of Columbus gave their annual banquet at the 
Palace on Friday night, and the occasion was one of great pleas- 
ure for all the members who attended. The Knights of Colum- 
bus is an organization thai has made a splendid showing in the 
past year, and the growth of the order and the plans for the 
future were discussed. Mumm was the wine of preference. 

Mr. and Mrs. James A. Murray, of the Eacienda, Monterey, 
accompanied by Mrs. P. I). Roe, of New York, lunched at Hotel 
Del Monte on the first day of the year. 

In spite of the continuous downpour of rain on the 31st, a 
few enthusiastic golfers made two rounds of the linl s 
competition for the Del Monte cup for men, for which there 
seventeen entries. The semi-final round v.; on Saturda; 

morning, the 1st, W. F. Garby, of the Clarem lountry Club 

beating Douglas Grant of the Burlingame Country Club 2 up 1 
to play, and H. Spens-Black. of the San Francisco Qolf and 
Country Club winning from J. W. Byrne, of th lib. In 

the final round played on Saturda,, after! a, W. I'". Qai 

IT. Spens-Black i up 2 to go. arid won the cup. 

On Saturday, the Alumnae Association of the Girls' Eigh 
School of this eitj gave a rw i ption to its members in the banquet 
room of the Palace. As all graduates of the liirls' I 
whether members of the A- ir not, were asked to attend, 

this will be one of the largest of the season. The object of the 
meeting is to encourage a closer spirit of friendliness amo 
girls who were members of that institution. Mrs. I.. II. EUert 
is the president, Mrs. Charles Smith and Mrs. A. Klink 
presidents; Mrs. M. Oneill, treasurer, and Hiss I ss Meyerfield, 

SI I. in . 

Mrs. J. D. IVi i ockton, and her charming daughter 

Anna are at the Fairmont, where they have bei eir re- 

turn from their , rip to Vw York and the Fast. As 

usual, they were lavishly entertained daring th( ad had 

the inn, York in the grip of a real 

"down East" snowstorm. Miss Peters - one of the mosl popu- 
lar of the societj girls, being especially liked by the men in the 

navv and the arntv. 

The Counl and Countess de Saint Seine, of M 
the first of the week in town. They regis il the Hotel Vic- 

toria. 

I.. \Y. \l Laine, o P - 

the Hotel Viet. uia. 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Goufth Streets 

A comfortable, high order, uptown hotel, yow under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN. formerly manager of St. 
DunAaaU 



<F 



Reserve your table now 
for the fun of the 
"FIRST NIGHT" SUPPER 
and entertainment 
at the 



^ 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 



^ 



celebrating the opening 

of the 

COLUMBIA THEATRE 



Jf 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 



y MSl* 




HOTELSAVOY 

SEATTLE 

Twelve Stories of 
Solid Comfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping district. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, & 1 .50 op 


/W^%\ 



UNEXCELLED TRAIN SERVICE 

DAILY TO AND FROM 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE EXPRESS, the through parlor car train, 
leaves San Francisco daily at 2:00 p. m. arriving at 
Del Monte at 5:43 p. m. 

DEL MONTE LOCAL leaves San Francisco at 3:00 p.m. 
daily arriving at Del Monte at 7:21 p. m. in time for 
dinner. 

An Ideal arrangement for week end parties 
H. R WARNER. Manager Hotel Del Monte. California 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. Sun in Every Room. 
Elaborate Furnishings. Excellent Cuiaine. Large Lobby and 
Reception Room. Grtll Room. Dining Room 

Mrs. W. F. Morris. Proprietor, formerly of Hotel Cecil 

Bush Street. San Francisco 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, C*l 

Fourth uad nun S*t 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Rales per Pay. $2. SO Rooms without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. 13.00. U.S0 snd MOO. 

European Plan 

11.00 par day and up 
With bath. $1 60 and up 



F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



FRITZ MULLER & SONS 

Proprietors 

Seams Cssscay. I8M 



Bismarck Cafe 

Leads in catering: to San Francisco's epicures and music lovers 
POPULAR PRICES 
Music noon, eveniners and after theatre by the famous Herr Ferdi- 
nand Stark's Vienna Orchestra 
PACIFIC BUILDING San Franciaco MARKET AND FOURTH 



14 



PIk»!&iF@ 9 § 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



(Continued from Page 11.) 

All theatrical New York is ringing with the phenomenal suc- 
cess of two Californians, Miss Nance O'Neil and Mr. Tully Mar- 
shall. The former is now under the active management of David 
Belasco, who no doubt fully realized that Miss O'Neil was full 
of wonderful and latent possibilities as a dramatic artist. Her 
triumph is all „he greater, as the role given her is not by any 
means a star role, nor even an attractive or effective one, and it 
is not until the last act where she is given any opportunity at all, 
but here she rose to heights which simply dazzled the staid and 
dyed-in-the-wool New York critics. Even Alan Dale, the hardest 
to please of all the Gotham reviewers, states that Miss O'Neil 
now takes her place with the very greatest actresses. The play, 
named in English "The Lily," is a translation from the French 
by Belasco, and when it was cast, it was with the idea of giving 
no certain person a star part, but Miss O'Neil's superb personal- 
ity and ability simply "made" her role a powerful one. She has 
been a long time coming into her own, and her path to fame has 
been tedious and long, through byways beset with trials and trib- 
ulations and bickerings. Long may she reign, and greater still 
may be her future success. 

Tully Marshall recorded another sudden rise in the theatrical 
firmament through his wonderful work in Clyde Fitch's play 
named "The City," the last effort penned on this earth by this 
late lamented and gifted writer. "The City" is away from any- 
thing that Fitch ever wrote, the gloom of tragedy and big things 
permeates it throughout. San Francisco will, of course, in time, 
have the chance to see this wonderful play, which it is claimed is 
even stronger and more thrilling and vital than anything that 
Bernstein has written. It is said that the success of Marshall is 
the greatest since the time that Richard Mansfield leaped into 
sudden fame when he first gave his notable performance of Baron 
Chevrial in "The Parisian Romance." 

* * * 

San Francisco is to have a long-felt want supplied. The es- 
tablishing here of The Western Lyceum Association means much 
for the artistic future of this city. Notable artists of every de- 
scription will be brought to this coast, among them some of the 
most widely known dramatic and musical stars. Mr. Richard 
Clave is the local manager, and he will be associated with Mr. 
Walter Montague of London, England. The latter has an in- 
ternational reputation as an author and stage director. We have 
been singularly lacking in this form of entertainment for years, 
in fact have been practically provincial in this respect, as the 
East is honeycombed with lyceum entertainments and lyceum 
bureaus, who provide popular and high class and clean artist it- 
performances designed to reach the middle and working classes 
as well as the society element. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

Gottlob, Marx & Co. will inaugurate the career of their new 
and magnificent playhouse, the Columbia, on Monday night, and 
a brilliant gathering of representative playgoers will be in attend- 
ance to greet William H. Crane and his company in George Ade's 
comedy, "Father and the Boys," which will run for two weeks. 
Mr. Crane, it is very certain, will prove worthy the brilliant 
opening of this splendid theatre, which probably has no equal in 
this country. 

Margaret Dale is leading woman, and others well-known in the 
cast are Louis Massen, Percy Brooke, Adele Clark, Elsa Payne, 
Mildred Beverly, Vivian Martin, Forrest Orr, Sidney Blair, 
John P. Brawn and others. 

* * * 

The announcement that Harry Lander, the celebrated Scotch 
comedian and entertainer, will appear for six nights and five 
matinees in this city at Dreamland Rink, starting next Monday 
evening, January 10th, has created more interest than any other 
amusement event since the fire, and since Monday morning, when 
the seats were first placed on sale at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s, there 
has been an unbroken line of admirers of the wonderful little 
Scotchman who were anxious to secure choice locations for one 
or more of his entertainments. 

The Scotch societies of the city are going to attend in a body 
on Monday night, which is practically sold out, but, on account 




Miss Olga Nethersole, the celebrated emotional actress, who 
will start an engagement at the Van Ness Theatre Monday night 
in her newest American play, "The Writing on the Wall." 

of the immense size of Dreamland, choice locations for all the re- 
maining performances may be secured. Evening prices range 
from fifty cents to two dollars, and for the matinees a scale from 
twenty-five cents to one dollar prevails. 

* * * 

"St. Elmo" will be given its first presentation west of Chicago 
next Monday evening and throughout the week in the Alcazar. 
Vaughan Glaser, Fay Courtency and a selected company are 
now playing in it to crowded houses in the Academy of Music, 
New York, and all the metropolitan critics have declared that 
nothing so tremendously thrilling has been staged there in many 
years. In the cast will be the cream of the Alcazar (Y)iupaiiv. 
with Evelyn Vaughan as Edna Earl and John C. face as St. 
Elmo. That the play will exceed the Alcazar's usual one-week 
run is the opinion of all who have read the manuscript or wit- 
nessed a rehearsal. 



Dreamland Rink 



Stelner St., at Sutter. 
G Nights; 5 matinees only. 

Starting Monday evening. January loth. Wm. Morris (Inc.) pre- 
sents the world-famous Scotch comedian and entertainer. 

HARRY LAUDER, 

5i'S 1 ,™4; ompany °* celebrated associate- players. JULIAN 
ELTINGE and special LAUDER ORCHESTRA. 

Night prices— 50c, 75c, Jl, $1.60 and $2. Matinees, 26c. 50c. 76c. 
and Jl. Seats at Sherman, Clay & Co.'s, Sutter and Kearnv ste 



JANUABY 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



The last performances of thai musical co Iv of the Golden 

North, "The Alaskan." will take place at the Savoy Theatre this 
Saturday afternoon and evening ami at the Sunday matinee. 
"The Wolf," by Eugene Walter, author of "Paid in Pull" and 
"The Easiest Way," will begin an engagement limited to one 
week. Andrew Rohson, who scored such a success as Jules Beau- 
bien, when "The Wolf" was first seen in this city at the Van 
Ness Theatre, returns in the same role, and with a company of 

players of splendid reputation. 

* * * 

The coming engagement of Olga Nethersole, the distinguished 
English actress at the Van Ness Theatre, week of January 10th, 
is an event of especial interest, inasmuch as it will disclose this 
eminent player in a role entirely different to anything she has 
heretofore essayed. Miss Nethersole will appear as the devoted 
mother, loving wife and tenement reformer in her play, "The 
Writing on the Wall." Matinee Saturday. 

* * * 

Arturo Bernardi, styled in Italy "The Great Bernardi," will 
make his first appearance in this city at the Orpheum as the most 
famous protean actor in Europe. He plays all the characters in 
two comedies, the first called "The Escapade of Geralamo" and 
the last a skit entitled "The Surprise." 

The Willy Fantzer troupe is sure of a cordial reception. Willy 
Pantzer is an ingenious acro-pantomimic artist. 

Miss Una Clayton and her players, including Francis Morey, 
will appear in a one act sketch of human interest called "His 
Local Color," of which Miss Clayton is the authoress. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Vbelker will introduce their artistic 
and skillful musical interlude. "Twilight in the Studio." 

Next week will be the last of the Basque Grand Opera Quar- 
tette, Belle Davis and her Crackerjacks, Fox and Foxies' Circus. 
and Franklyn Underwood and Frances Slosson. 



The Telegraph Hill Neighborhood Association will pre- 
sent the musical extravaganza, "Professor Napoleon," at the 
Valencia Theatre, on January 25th, 36th, S7th, 28th and 89th. 
Over six hundred San Franciscans will participate in the pro- 
duction. Rehearsals are being held at the Fairmont Hold, si. 
Francis, and Maple Hall. The following committee is in charge 

Mrs. Elizabette Ashe, Mrs. Frank B. Anderson. Mr- Cnae 
0. Alexander, Mrs. William B. Bourn. Mrs. Francis J. Carolan, 
Mrs. Patrick Calhoun, Mrs. Edward L. Eyre, -Mrs. J. Athearii 
Folger, Mrs. Joseph D. Grant, Miss .Mice S. Griffith, Mrs. Wil- 
liam Mintzer, Mrs. George A. Newhall. Mrs. Carter 1'. Pomero' 
Mrs. Gerald Rathbone, Mrs. Joseph Sloss. Mrs. Henry T. Scott, 
Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor, Mrs. William S. TeviSj Mrs. 
Mou lit ford S. Wilson, Miss Ashe, Mrs. John Connor. Mrs. J. II. 
Deering, Miss A'. Gibbs. Mrs. Thomas Magcc. Sr.. Mrs. S. \ln 
nard, Mrs. Norman McLaren, Miss Dickens. Miss l-'.milv 
Ian, Dr. Herbert Allen. Dr. Camillus Bush. Dr. Philip King 
Brown, Dr. Walter Scott Franklin, Dr. Florence Holesclaw, Dr. 
Langley Porter, Dr. A. B. Span! ding, Dr. Harry M. Sherman, 
Mr. Edouard Taussig, Civ. S. M. Rocca. 



The frequenl changes of the weather, while they may he 

said to be unusual in this climate, are none the OU8 to 

people who carelessly expose themselves or to th<>sr «' _ 
other extreme and coddle themselves The 

wearer of woolen onder-gannentf - an especially favored victim 

of pneumonia and kindred troubles. We find that physicians 
are being generally convinced of the ■•)' a war against 

the wearing ol wool next the body. Wool i- a natural 

carrying, germ-breeding substance. It i< a receptable for the 
decay of perspiration. The Deimel Linen Mesh is a delightful 
fabric which obviates all the objections physicians lodge against 
wool underwear. The Deimel Linen Mesh headquarter- - 
tatter street, just below Kearny. 



' Mr. Henry V. l.cw. of Oakland, is reported 

very heavy investor in Sacramento Valley lands for the purpose 
of engaging in the culture of the eucalyptus on a stupendous 

Male. Mr. I. Haines, of Woodland, represents the same syndi- 
cate, with headquarters at Woodland, lr is proposed to operate 
in Yolo, Sacramento and Colusa Counties. 



The Star Hair Remedy, the best tonic ; restores color to 

gray hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. A 
druggists. 



$.£ede/wi 

The Quality Hair Store 

1809 FILLMORE, near SUTTER 

Men's Exclusive Department at 2271 California St., near 

Webster. 

A Complete Line of 

Beautiful Wavy Switches, Pompadours 
and Transformations 

and the very latest creations in directoires, chignons. Billy 
Burkes and cluster puffs at prices that are reasonable. 

Hair Dressing, 25c and 50c Shampooing 50c 

Manicuring 25c Scalp Treatment 50c 

Quintonica, a most excellent hair Tonic. 
Artistic, Airy and Ventilated Wigs my specialty made of purest 
human hair obtainable. Mail orders receive Prompt and Care- 
ful Attention. Established 1866. 




Ladies 
Tailor 



li is. with great pleasure that we announce the opening of our down town establishment 
at 418 SUTTER STREET between Powell and Stockton, with the newest materials of im- 
ported and domestic patterns of high quality. We have always succeeded in pleasing our 
customers and are now better prepared than ever before to give perfect satisfaction. We 
have the latest approved styles from the leading fashion centers of the world, and our gar- 
ments are guaranteed to fit perfectly. 

Fair Prices, Best of Work, Fine Materials, Correct Styles, Perfect Fit. AH that's Latest, 
All that's Good. Your trial order is respectfully solicited and we invite you to call whether 
you are ready to place your order or not. Very respectfully yours. 



Oscar Vogel 



Coughlan Co. 

(MRS. J. SHEEHAN) 

FINE MILLINERY 

will be in their permanent location about 

January 1, 1910 

at 

49 Grant Ave. 



RABJOHN & MORCOM 

Paintings. Engravings. Picture Framing and Artists' Supplies 
Free Art Gallery 

240 POST ST. (near Grant Ave.) 408 FOURTEENTH ST. (near Broadway) 
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 



R Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 

51 LICK PL ACL off Sorter, beraraa Rearer aaa Moatrom-r. 




Phone DonfUl 163} 



Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet of exquisitely perfumed powdered leares to 
carry In the purse. A handy article for all occasions to quickly Im- 
prove the complexion. Sent for S Cents In stamps or coin. F*. T. 
Hopkins. 17 Great Jones St.. N. T. 

Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

SacaeCa* A. ZcSeraeea k Saas 
Zellerbach Building. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8. 1910. 



TFrH ATT TAVERN CO. 

X -I— I V» li 111 V./ COR. EDDY and POWELL STREETS 

Phone Douglas 4700 

Restaurant, Cafe, Ladles' Grill 

Special Lunch served during shopping hours. 

Concerts daily during Lunch, Shopping hours, 
Dinner, and After Theatre. 

The orchestra is under the leadershio of the gifted and talented 
young Violin Virtuoso. Abe "Wise. 

Under the management of MR. A. C. MORRISSON 




New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

n. I N. W. Comer 
nOtei Polk & Post StS. 
San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 

Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 



328 Bush Street 

Below Kearny Street 
PHONE KEARNY 1812 



Jules' Restaurant 

Music every evening by Fred Epstein Orchestra 

Dinners, Sundays and Holidays 
DINNERS. With Wine 75c With Wine. S1.00 



Kg 



Be Clean— Use 

DUNTLEY 

PNEUMATIC 

CLEANERS 

"Not a Toy" 

Electric and hand power. See our six sizes for home 
use from $38 lo $140. wilh full sel of cleaning tools. 

S. F. Compressed Air Cleaning Co. 

Both Phones Sutter and Stockton Sts., S. F. 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 



TEk> Mniiter jflom&i Mkkr 



If the present program of the nations 
More Ships and Soldiers, is carried out, there will be not less 

than half a billion dollars expended 
in warship construction during 1910. How much may be added 
for the armies above the ordinary cost of maintenance there are 
no figures at hand showing even an approximation, but nearly 
all the nations are looking about for improved field artillery and 
small arms. In addition to these expenditures for war machin- 
ery, plans are matured for extensive additions to harbor de- 
fenses. The indications are that the rush on the work for more 
complete preparedness for war will be on a more extended scale 
in 1910 than it was in 1909. This is conspicuously true of Eng- 
land, France, Italy, Germany, Russia, Japan and Turkey's 
naval establishments. Germany's estimates are about $120,000,- 
000, and those of Great Britain not far from $200,000,000, in- 
cluding the ships the colonies have agreed to construct. From 
this it is reasonable to conclude that the craze for more fighting 
ships and more soldiers is rather more intense than at the begin- 
ning of 1909. It seems to be a race to see which nations may be 
driven into bankruptcy, the final analysis of which is certain 
to be revolutions on the part of the people to relieve themselves 
of the enormous burdens which have been put upon them during 
the last half-dozen years to prepare for war — war that is afraid 
to come because of the terrible consequences that would follow. 
The burden seems to be heaviest upon the people of Russia, ( ice- 
many and Japan. 



Although there are no signs of any- 
Tiie Strain Increasing, thing like a great war in the near 

future, the strain as well as the 
provocation are becoming greater every day, and it does not seerii 
possible for diplomacy to stem the current very much longer. 
Conditions in the Near as well as in the Far East are as favorable 
for war as they could well be without actual hostilities. In the 
Near East — the Balkans — conditions may be said to be critical, 
and only wise and prudent diplomacy on the part of Austria- 
Hungary and Germany will stave off trouble. Backed by Eng- 
land, France. Italy and Russia, the three Balkan States — Bul- 
garia, Servia and Montenegro — have practically notified Aus- 
tria and Germany that they stand ready as a unit to repel any 
advance of the Germanic States toward the south. To this al- 
most an insult, Turkey lifts her voice in support of the stand the 
Balkans have taken. The time was. and not further back than 
Bismarck's time, when such a slap would have been answered by 
a forward movement of the entire army, nor does any one suppose 
that the Kaiser and Frances Joseph will soon forget the thrust. 
The powers behind the Balkan State are as ready as they will 
ever be to measure strength with the Germanic States; besides, 
it is decidedly to the interest of lli< Balkans and Turkey to have 
it out with Austria and Germany any time after the weather 
permit- campaigning in the mountains. 



In the Far East, Japan and Russia 
Russia Watching Japan, are nearing a crisis. Without ap- 
parent cause, Russia is massing an 
army in Siberia on the Manehurian border, and in St. Peters- 
burg army circles, it is an open secret that war with Japan is 
looked for before the end of 1910. Russia is not trying to dis- 
guise the fact that she is pushing the Amour River extension of 
the Siberian Railroad to Vladivostok, and fortifying that city 
by land and by water, also providing quarters for a large army. 
The Russian charge is. that Japan is apparently rushing the 
work of preparedness, and that the construction of the Antung- 
Moukden. Railroad has no meaning other than that Moukden is 
to be made the Japanese base to operate upon Harbin. Northern 
Manchuria and Vladivostok, fn reply to diplomatic inquiry. 
Russia says Japan does not give satisfactory answers concerning 
her intentions in Manchuria, -which is taken to mean that the 
Mikado has in mind to occupy the whole of Manchuria and 
crowd out Russia's commerce and farmers. Concerning all this, 
the word comes from Peking that negotiations are pending 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



IT 



which, if successful, would make an alliance between China and 
Russia against Japan, in the event of war, quite possible. It is 
known that Eussia is preparing to negotiate a large loan, sup- 
posedly to pay war expenses, and it is also known thai Japan IB 
adding strength to her war establishment as last as possible. 

The United States and Mexico are 
Of General Interest. still friendly, 1ml the action of Mex- 
ico in aiding President Zelaya to es- 
cape from Nicaragua, thus defeating the purpose of the Wash- 
ington Government is likely to end in strained relations between 
the two nations. 

France is turning her attention to the construction of 

airships for war purposes, which, together with scores of new 
submarines, makes her feel safer about German invasion. 

' Albert I is now upon the throne of the late Leopold of 

Belgium, and his assurance that he means to right the wrongs. 
that his uncle inflicted upon the Kongo Free State and open up 
that country to immigration, trade and commerce has pleased this 
country greatly, for the United States was in some measure re- 
sponsible for Leopold getting a foothold there and for his sub- 
sequent brutal administration of the affairs of the Stale. 

The rapid spread of socialism in Germany the last year 

has set that Government to thinking seriously about taking- 
measures to suppress it. 

The electors of England are sure to sustain the Commons 

in its war over the budget with the Peers. 



ENUMERATORS' TEST EASY. 

Any person of good judgment, who has received an ordinary 
common school education, can readily and easily pass the test to 
be given applicants for census enumerators' places on Saturday, 
February 5th, the date finally set by the United States Census 
Director Durand, according to an announcement from the Census 
Bureau recently. This will be a comforting assurance to the sev- 
eral hundred thousand who are believed to be contemplating ap- 
plication for the places. 

All persons, whether women or men, who may desire to beco 

census enumerators, must be citizens of the United Stales; resi- 
dents of the Supervisors' District for which they wish to be ap- 
pointed; must be not less than 18 nor more than 70 years of 
age; must be physically able to do the work; must be trostwor- 
thy, honest and of good habits; must have at least an ordinary 
education, and must be able to write plainly and « ith reasonable 
rapidity. 

Those who can comply with these requirements are invited to 
put in their applications, as there will be at leas) 68,000 enumi r- 
atoi-s" places to be filled by the middle of March in preparation 
for the enumeration beginning April 15th. 

Application forms, with full instructions for tilling in. and 
complete information concerning the lest and the method 
pointment, can be secured by writing to the Supen isor ei i lensui 
for the Supervisor's District in which the applicant lives. All 
applications, properly filled in, must he filed with the Supervisors 
not later than January 85th, as an.) received alter that date can- 
not be considered. 



One of the most artistic calendars of the year is issued in 

full color by the Continental Building and Loan Association., It 
is s splendid reproduction of Louis Moeller'a celebrated painting, 
"Drive Dull Care Away." A middle-aged and jolly man sits 
before a music rack, his violin to his chin, and the bow fairly 
sings the notes while he smiles to himself in keen appreciation 
of bis art with the bow. Tie is costumed in accordance with the 
stvles in the latter 1700, and the whole picture is spark i 
bright. On the table before him is bis pipe and the othe 
comitants of a good-tempered enjoyment of life. He seems the 
embodiment of the title. 



The combination of the artistic and a] is 

rarely met with among photographers. In thi - tnford 

Studio at 116-118 Geary street, San Francisco, may claim this 
distinctive gain. Here is a staff of artists to none in 

the country. These gentlemen are experts in the pro' 
They produce only the best in photography. 



Announcement 



The Tozer Co. 



beg to announce that they 
are now permanently loca- 
ted at 228 Grant Ave. Next to 
"White House. Second floor. 



Fine Wall Papers, Draperies, and Interior 
Decorating 



Telephone Douglas 1869 




CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



Incomparably tetter than any other in its class. 
A Little Lower Priced Than the Others. 

Benj. Curtaz & Son 

113-117 Kearny Street near Post 



Addressing Machine 

FOR SALE CHEAP 

One power drive Bellknap Addressing Machine 
complete with typewriter to itencil names. 'Will 
address and cut 6000 wrappers per hour. 

Commercial Supply Co., 75 Fourth Street 



A. W. B«ft 






Alice Bea\ 


Best 


S 


Art 


School 


Life Claasea 
Day and Night 


1628 Bush Street 

Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 



•>is. — The choicest variety to select from a; 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powe!! 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 

Office Hours; 1 to 4 P. M. Galen Bid*.. 391 Sutter Street 

and by appointment San Francisco 

Phone Douelaa 4138 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 




With the passing of Mr. D. 0. Mills 
Death of T). 0. Mills at his fine estate a1 Millbrae, there 

has gone from the financial and so- 
cial world of California a big determining factor. Mr. Mills 
was probably the really least kDown to the people of California 
of the men who have remained to us from the old age of the iron 
men who carved the State out of the wilderness. He was, never- 
theless, the one that was the must esteemed 3 for of all things 
known of him. the i:oud seemed always to identify his actions. He 
was a man of large ideas, of large humanity, and his ideas of 
philanthropy were always based on the greatest measure of re- 
sults in just the same ratio as his business schemes. He- was at 
no time a poseur, and at no time a dictator. That he had from 
the start of his wonderful career a keen regard for the welfare 
of his fellowman, has always been shown by some unostentatious 
(TeecT. He was always striving to make men useful and did not, 
any time, wish to make them grateful or subservient! Different 
from the other kings of early days, he at no time was a dictator. 
His rule was builded upon the necessities of others, and. in cre- 
ating the demand for their services, he invariably earned a lasting 
friendship. He was in great measure a silent humanitarian, 
and his acts of benevolence were legion, and nothing would pain 
him so much as to have them advertised as other than acts of 
friendship or simply as regard for his fellowmen. His was a 
practical system, and it has never humiliated any man or woman 
to have received anything from D. 0. Mills, He was one of Ihc 
kind who went about making men and women useful to them- 
selves and to the community. 

In California he was chiefly referred to as the savior of the old 
Bank of California at the time of the Ralston crash. This, loo, 
he did unostentatiously, and he had a decided aversion to having 
his acts referred to as disinterested benevolences, dp to the 
time of his passing, he maintained a lively interest in the pro- 
gress of California and of San Francisco, and since the fire, all 
of his energies have been engaged in the rehabilitation of the city 
and its financial institutions. The death of I). 0. Mills is a dis- 
I inct loss to the city. 



Mr. Julius W. Raphael, of the rc- 
Thanks to this Man. organization committee of the Cali- 
fornia Safe Deposit and Trust Com- 
pany, is entitled to the thanks of the community and that of the 
depositors for the good work accomplished. The fact that the 
bank will most probably resume at the old stand with a splendid 
capital and with some of the biggest financiers at its back, in 
February, is due to his and Mr. Bartnett's efforts. Through Mr. 
Raphael, many of the depositors who could not otherwise be 
reached have been brought to see the advantage that lay in the 
resumption of affairs by a going concern. Mr. Raphael is cer- 
tainly entitled to thanks under the i ircumstances. 



Hibernia Savings 
axd Loan Society 



approved bonds and stocks. Municipality, school and other bonds 
of the value of over nine millions of dollars. The bank premises 
are valued at $700,000. and the bank owns other real estate in 
the State of California to the value of $613,859.14, and there is 
cash balance of nearly two million dollars in the treasury. This 
is the ninety-fifth half-yearly report. 



The report of the above society has 
been published, and will be found in 
another column. A glance at the 
figures will show the very healthful 
condition of this great financial institution. The society has 
never before filed so flattering a stab mini, and the condition of 
the bank is a mirror of conditions in the city of San Francisco. 
The Hibernia Savings and Loan Society has always been the 
poor man's saving bank, and the fact that his savings are on the 
increase and the society in a flourishing condition, shows that 
San Francisco is <>n the up-grade to prosperity. 



The San Francisco Savings Union's 
San Fiiani i-i o sworn statement has been filed, show- 

Savings Union. ing the sjate of its business, its as- 

sets, and it? liabilities, on Decem- 
ber 31, 1909. The condition is a flourishing one, and it ought 
to be a source of pride to its officials. This list includes $12,- 
521,204.4(5 secured by first lien on real eslate in the State of 
California, and $1,014,941.35 by pledge and hypothecation of 



A Bad Year 
Fob Silver. 



The silver mining industry has had 
a very bad year, and this is owing 
to the low price for silver, lead, cop- 
per and zinc. In Colorado and Utah 

l v of the mills and smelters have been closed for the year. It 

was difficult to make profits on the low grade ores. Two other 
factors have had a tendency to affect the silver production in 
the United States — one of these was the lack of a market, tem- 
porarily, in India, and the other the very heavy production in 
Canada, and this production has had the effect of still further 
depreciating the price of the white metal. Great losses in silver 
production were sustained by Utah ($3,007,900), Colorado 
($2,157,600), Montana ($1,806,000), and Idaho ($1,163,400), 
and smaller losses by Nevada. Arizona, New Mexico and Cali- 
fornia, although the percentages of loss suffered by Arizona and 
New Mexico were large. 



The Merchant Marine League will limit its efforts in the 

present Congress to obtaining a new law that will make it pos- 
sible lo open direct- mail routes across the ocean to the Orient, 
to Australasia, and to South and Central America. The League 
has iss.ued a circular in which it attempts to instruct editors as 
to the meaning of the word subsidy, and I shall have something 
to say on this subject later. 



Fondly the old-time merchant clings to his location, anil 

Lyons, the London Tailor, one of the stand-bys of San Francisco, 
has at length come into his own by removal to his old quarters. 
This well-known firm was established for many years in the old 
History Building, and as soon as the present Bancroft building 
took the place of the structure destroyed by the fire, and, later, 
other changes taking place, Charles Lyons came back to the 
down town location of years ago. The exhibition room for suit- 
ings is one of the finest in the city, while the workshop is one of 
the largest, and is light and airy. Charles Lyons' firm has been 
known as one of the standard establishments of the city, and now 
that it has removed to its old location, it will have not only the 
patronage of the new San Francisco, but its old patrons as well. 
The number is 719 Market street, and the repute of the shop as 
one that fashions suits in fine style and in moderate price will 
be kept. up. 

Private Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member \ Chicago Board of Trade 

(_ Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 

Mills Bide. 

Tel. Kearny 482 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Angelas 



Branch Office: Palace Hotel 



JANUARY INVESTMENTS 

6 per cent 1910 send for 



Before converting your S. P. of ARIZ, 
our list of 

BOND OFFERINGS 



412 Montgomery Street 



SUTRO & CO., 



San Francisco 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address. 812-814 
Claus Spreckels Bide. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyrights. Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 



MARLEY & CO. 



116-118 Geary Street 

Makers of Tailored Shirts, Night Gowns and Pajamas. Largest slock 
of imported fabrics on the Coast. 

Phone Douglas 3108, and representative will call. 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



19 




Some time ago there was published in these columns a 

poem entitled "The Major's remedy." This poem had quite a 
run in the exchanges, and until the real author, Mr. E. A. Brin- 
instool, of the Los Angeles Record 3 made himself known as the 
man behind the verse. The poem was plagiarized from the ori- 
ginal, and had only the change of title to commend it to public 
notice. Mr. Brininstool discovered his stolen thunder in a re- 
print in the Boston Globe, and in his righteous indignation has 
demanded this explanation, and it is cheerfully made. The verse 
appears to have suffered no change, and on the principle ad- 
vanced by the king of plagiarizers, Jack London, that the man 
who gives publicity to that which is good is justified in literary 
theft, we suppose that the plagiarizer in this case is entitled to 
great praise. 

"Severance Rapid Calculator" is the name of a small volume 
which is sub-headed the "Accountant's Assistant." This book is 
intended as a self-instructor to youth who are seeking a short 
cut in practical instruction in mathematics. The merchant who 
is striving after the accumulation of money, and to whom a 
treatise that will make his labors less arduous, will be welcome, 
is advised that he has here found the open sesame. A cursory 
examination of the method develops the fact that it is a most 
practical treatise, and does not contain any magic, but just prac- 
tical instructions in practical terms. The booklet is published 

by D. N". Severance, of Chicago, Illinois. 

* * * 

The reviewer is in receipt of a booklet of verse: "A Legend 
of the Coos." This is written by Agnes Ruth Lockhart. This 
lady is a native of Coos Bay country, Marshfiehl, Oregon, being 
her home. The book is daintily and artistically nut up by the 
Philopolis Press. It is the story of a bird, (lie wind' crowned 
sparrow. This bird is singular in that it sings at night during 
the late summer and the early autumn muni lis. The legend is 
founded on the species of bird's first appearance in the Western 
wilds, along the Coos River, Oregon. It is a pretty romance and 
prettily (old . 



CHRISTENINC! PARTY. 

On Sunday, December 2(i, 1909, a christening party, consist- 
ing of Signor and Signora Eugenio Bianchi, Jr., whose little 
daughter Carmelina was to be christened on thai day, accom- 
panied by relatives and friends, proceeded in the Chui 
Notre Dame des Victoires, where the ceremony «ras perfi 
by the Rev. Fr. Joseph E. Sollier, the pastor and head of the 
Marist Fathers on this coast. The rich and elaborate dressing of 
the little one attracted a deal of comment and admiration. A 
mantle thrown over the shoulders was The particular gift of a 
prominent Italian prelate. The young miss traces noble lineage 
through the two branches of her parents' families. On the 
father's side (who is the son of the late Signor ami Signora 
Bianchi, famous operatic artists) is the t'onii di Campagna 
family, one of the most ancient and distinguished ooble Families 
of Verona. On the mothers, the Gandolfos. a noble family of 
Genoa, numbering among its members an Embassador to France 
from his country, and an Archbishop, who presided over 
tor many years: also others distinguished in the paths of diplo- 
macy and the harsher calling of war. Signora Bianchi, we learn, 
from documents issued and received from the Archives oi Her- 
aldry, is privileged to assume the title of Countess Gandolfo. 
From the church the party wended its way in i. Bush- 

nell's. This was followed by a dinner at a down-town restaurant, 
after which all attended a theatre party, and the affair came to a 
happy close. 



The privileges desired are what the average woman calls 

her rights. 



Alameda County is rapidly becoming a manufacturing 

county. All along the Eronl toward Port Costa and cm the flats 

bacli of Oakland and north of Alameda, factory sites are being 
taken up, and if the big railroads would but make an effort, we 
would soon see Oakland as a big manufacturing place such as 
Lynn, Massachusetts, is. The increase in the output for the 
last year over the previous year is over three millions of dollars, 
which isn't bad for a place that is in its infancy. The manufac- 
tures for 1909 aggregated something like $60,351,855. 



VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

is the 

Musical Instrument For Everybody 

Victors - $10to$60 Victrolas - $125 to $200 

Easy Terms 

Sherman Ray & Go. 

Sleinway and Other Pianos. 

Player Pianos of All Grades Victor Talking Machines 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS, SAN FRANCISCO 

FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS, OAKLAND 



Benjamin Fay Mills' 

Daughter Is One of Our Many Appreciative Graduates 

My Dear Mr Smith: "In the few weeks spent, with our thanks to your efficient methods 
and kindly assistance, I became efficiently skilled to like a responsible position as private 
secretary. I take pleasure in giving your school a strong endorsement for those expect' 
ing to enter business life" (Signed) ETHELYN MILLS 

N. B. — Our Commercial Course is as thorough as Ihe Shorthand, which is ABSOLUTE- 
LY as good as is to be had ANYWHERE. 

Preparatory coaching a specialty. 

Every Graduate a Position— Three Calls This Week We Cant Fill 

A personal call will convince you (hat 

BERKELEY BUSINESS COLLEGE 

AND COACHING SCHOOL 

is justly called "the Business University of California. 



P. S. — How about joining our Night School 



Z. P SMITH, Principal. 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pure Water for Oakland 
Alameda 
Incorporated Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacterlologlcally purified by electrical process 6 gallons 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. $1.60 per month. Single 6 gallon 
bottle. 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 4192. 
980 45th Street Oakland. Csl. 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER 



1400 to 1450 Fourth St.. San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private F-xcharure Connecting all Departments 




Many ■ great hope is erected on a small foundation. 



PEPSIN 

GUM 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



•20 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, $400,000. Cash Assets, {900,000 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

Employers" Liability, General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels. Automobiles, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Acci- 
dents Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund. F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A, Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deering, 
Counsel. 

Directors— A. Borel, H. E. Bothln, Edward L, Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering. E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt. J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son, "William S. Tevis. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Tire Insurance Company 

Of Har-.ford. Established 1860. 

Capital Stock $1,000,000 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,462,739 

Total Cash Assets 6.365,877 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
360 California Street San Francisco. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well managed institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K. Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 




Sign of the 
Pacific Mutual of California 



"Men of California" keep the 
premiums paid for your Acci- 
dent Insurance "in Cali- 
fornia" where the investment 
will add to your prosperity. 

The best Accident and Dis- 
ability Contracts ever issued 
in the world are being writ- 
ten by the 

Pacific Mutual of California 

Agency of F. A. STEARNS 

Manager Accident Department, 

501-502 Shreve Building 

Phone Douglas 240 San Francisco 




IN9VMCE 




The fire insurance companies are apparently satisfied with their 
experience last year. The losses were upon the whole less than 
the average, and the rates were also reduced from the high alti- 
tude they reached after the San Francisco fire. It has been noted 
that the years succeeding great conflagrations have generally 
been profitable years, but it is only the unthinking public who 
fail to realize that the increase of profit arises from the increase 
of rates following conflagrations of magnitude. Then history 
repeats itself in the reaction from the higher rates about the 
i lii ill year, and it is this reaction which has come upon the com- 
panies during the year just passed. The fact that in this city 
the experience has shown fewer losses in number and less per 
centage per loss, has kept up the courage of the companies at a 
high tension, and the confidence in the future in this section is 
quite significant. But there are heard a few croakers who preach 
the old exploded doctrine that too much prosperity is bad for the 
companies, and invites reprisals from hostile legislation. The 
present feeling, however, is too buoyant to be disturbed by any 
such fears. 

* * * 

There are those who believe that there are too many life in- 
surance companies present and prospective. This impression is 
derived from a contemplation of the weakness displayed by some 
companies, which never should have been organized, and the 
questionable methods resorted to by others in their bid for pub- 
lic patronage. Many years must elapse, however, before the full 
growth of life insurance is attained. Time was when the busi- 
ness was retarded by prejudice, ignorance and superstition ; but 
opposition from these quarters has become faini and ineffective 
in later years. It is from within, not from without, that life 
insurance to-day is menaced. Every sound, honorable and skill- 
fully managed old-line company increases and perpetuates the 
well-being of the people as a whole. The redemption of its 

every promise to the insured is the best pleading in its favor. 

* * * 

A feature of President Gilliland's address at the forthcoming 
annual meeting of the Fire Underwriters' Association of the 
Pacific will be the advocacy of an insurance club having among 
other features proper facilities for the care of the insurance 
library, which, under present conditions, loses much of its value 
in members. Nearly three hundred responses have already been 
received to the invitation for the annual banquet, and there is 
every indication of unusual interest in the other proceedings. 
The two days 1 programme will include the reading of the fol- 
lowing papers and their discussion: 

I. "Bui Minus ol' Reinforced Concrete." Prof. Charles Derleth ; 
2. "History of the California Standard Form of Fire Insurance 
Policy." f. C. Ooogan; 3. "Collections," IT. P. Blanchard; 4. 
"Underwriters' Laboratory, Inc.," George X. Robertson; 5. "In- 
surance Brokers' Association." I). A. Spencer; 6. "Education of 
the Local Agent," R. .1. Highland ; 7. "Publicity and Education." 
A. P. Lange; 8. "Kent. Leasehold, Use ami Occupancy, ami 
Profit ami Loss Insurance," C. 0. Kinney; 9. State Regulation of 
Insurance Bates." Eastern Underwriter; 10. "Adjusting Fire 
Losses as a Business," Henry Hall: 11. "Apportionment of ami 
Contributions Under Non-concurrent Policies." William Sexton. 

■i * * 

The committee from the Board of Fire Underwriters that went 
East to confer with the People's National, State of Pennsylvania, 
Union of Philadelphia and Globe ami liutgers, for tin- purpose of 

patching up the differences arising from the recent ruling, made 
at the Monterey meeting regarding the appointment of sub- 
general agencies, has returned well-pleased with the result of 
its conference. The report of chairman .lames Wyper will not 
be made before aexi Tuesday, until which time particulars are 

withheld. 

* # # 

Thi' merger of the Phenix of Brooklyn with the Fidelity Fire, 
Henry Evans's company, which is an offshoot of the Continental, 

will make serious difficulty for the old agents ami managers of 
the Phenix all over the country, and particularly in California. 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



where all the old agents of the Phenix will lose their connection, 

the business going without exception to the present representa- 
tives of the Fidelity Fire. Men who have devoted their lives 
practically to the building up of the business of the Phenix Fire 
thus find themselves thrown out. Considered purely from a 
business standpoint, the merger will be beneficial both for the 
stockholders and policyholders of both companies. Nason & Co. 
will represent the FideHty-Phenix in San Francisco, and a letter 
from Henry Evans conveys the information that all agents in 
this State who have been representing the Fidelity will be con- 
tinued as agents of the Fidelity-Phenix. The new company will 
have a capital of $2,500,000, the astonishingly large surplus of 
$2,250,000 and total assets of nearly $14,000,000. The Phenix 
was in excellent financial condition when taken over. 

* * * 

Frederick F. Taylor, who was recently elected a vice- President 
of the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York, and 
who has, during the past ten years, managed the company's busi- 
ness on the Pacific Coast, leaves for New York on January 12th 
to take up his permanent residence in that metropolis. During 
his long stay on the coast. Mr. Taylor has become wedded to the 
ways of Californians, and expresses a genuine regret at being 
compelled to leave them, although of course appreciating the 
advantages in a business way that have come from his company's 
appreciation of his work in this department. It may not be gen- 
erally known that the department maintained by the Metropoli- 
tan on the Pacific Coast is in every way independent of the home 
office, being conducted precisely as if it were a home institution 
with the parent company behind it as a financial backer. 

* * * 

The Western Casualty Company, under the energetic manage- 
ment of Mr. Fred B. Lloyd, is President, of the firm "I' Lloyd & 
Robertson, is making steady headway. Since the merger with 
the Pacific Surety Company this is the one big casualty company 
of the Pacific Coast, and patrons have recognized the fact. The 

offices are in the Federal Trust Building. 

* '* * 

Special Agent fleorgc W. Carey, of the Standard Accident In- 
surance Company, who was recently sent south by Manager C. 
F. Briggs, has appointed D. C. Collier & Co. agents for San 
Diego. The Standard last year enjoyed the mos< prosperous 
year in its coast history, writing ; n premiums $6,000 more than 
during the year previous, and having ten thousand dollars less 

in losses tn pav. 

* * * 

The Home Insurance Company of New York has issued a re- 
membrance of Christmas to ils many clients in the shape of ■> 

folding scissor, a companion piece to the press button of a y ■ 

ago. The folding scissor is presented with the compliments of 

the season by the ollicors of the company. 

* * * 

Herbert Folger, of the George 11. Tyson general agency has 
been doing the Pacific Northwest. 

J. B. Levison, vice-president and marine secretary of the Fire- 
man's Fund Insurance Company, has returned from a trip 1 

President Burkhard, of the lioa Angeles V. idem Life, has 
gone to Europe. 

The Pioneer Fire of Tacoma is looking toward California. 

The Special Agents Association of Portland. Oregon, was 
unable to secure a quorum at the date sel for its annual meeting. 

Second vicc-Presi.lent Ballard of the Continental Fire has 
tendered his recognition. 

Fred TcK'nen. who made many friend- in San Francisco, a- 
coast manager of the Ohio German, lias located at Spokane. 
Wash., where he will engage in the general agency busii 

Uacdonald & Miles will move from the Ruse Building into the 
Mew Zealand Building on California street as soon as thai struc- 
ture is completed. 

There is no truth in the absurd rumor that the three giant 
life insurance companies, the Equitable, New York Life and 
Mutual Life of New York, will combine. 



The Home Insurance Company, New York 



Organized 1863. 



Cash Capital, $3,000,000 



He— Do von believe in the higher education for trirls? 

She — Oh. yes; I'm taking D aviation already. — E.r. 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States, Canada and Mexico. Insurance against loss 
by fire. Automobile insurance. Indemnity tor loss of rental income by 
fire. 
H. L. ROFF, General Agent. J. J. SHEAHAN, Ass't General Agent 

324 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
San Francisco Savings Union. 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1909, dividends have been de- 
clared at the rates per annum of four and one-eighth (4 1-8) per cent on 
term deposits and four (4) per cent on ordinary deposits, free of taxes, 
payable on and after Monday. January 3, 1910. A dividend not drawn 
will be added to the deposit account, becomes a part thereof and earns 
dividend from January 1st. Money deposited on or before the 10th day 
of January will receive dividend from January 1st. 

R. M. WELCH, Cashier. 
Office — N. W. Cor. California and Montgomery streets. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The German Savings and Loan Society. 
(The German Bank.) 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31, 1909, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Monday, January 3, 1910. Dividends not 
called for are added to the deposit account and earn dividends from 
January 1, 1910. 

GEORGE TOURNY, Secretary. 
Office — 526 California Street. Mission Braiych — 2572 Mission St., near 
22d. Richmond District Branch — 432 Clement St., between Fifth and 
Sixth avenues. 

ANNUAL MEETING. 
Joshua Hendy Irpn Works. 
The regular annual meeting of the Stockholders of the Joshua Hendy 
Iron Works will be held at the office of the corporation. No. 75 Fremont 
street, San Francisco, California, on TUESDAY, the 11th day of January, 
1910. at the hour of 10 o'clock A. M.. for the purpose of electing a Board 
of Directors to serve for the ensuing year and the transaction of such 
other business as may come before the meeting. 

CHARLES C. GARDNER, Secretary. 
Dated December 24, 1909. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Humboldt Savings Bank. 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31. 1909. a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent per annum on all savings deposits, 
free of taxes, payable on and after Monday. January 3. 1910. Dividends 
not called for are added to and bear the same rate of Interest as the 
principal from January 1, 1910. 

H. C. KLEVESAHL. Cashier. 
Office — 783 Market street, near Fourth. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
The Savings and Loan Society. 
(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco.) 
For the half year ending December 31. 1909, a dividend has been de- 
clared at the rate of four (4) per cent ner annum on all deposits, free 
of taxes, payable on and after Monday. January 3. 1910. Dividends not 
drawn become part of the deposit accounts and earn dividends at the 
same rate from January 1st. Money deposited on or before January 10th 
will earn interest from January 1st. 

W.M A. BOSTON. Cashier. 
Office — 101 Montgomery street, comer Sutter street. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE. 
Hibernia Savings and Loan Society. 
I»er of the olu <>r San Fr:u: 

ai a meeting od Dlrectora <>f this Society, held this day. 

a h\ i-i i . declared at the rate of three .ma three-fourths (3%) 

per cent per annum on all deposits for the six months ending Di 
09, free from all taxes, and payable on and after January 
Dividends not drawn will be added I 

a part thereof, and will earn dividend (Tom i i ».-poslta 

1910. will draw Interest from January 1. 
1910. RM Turin. Secretary. 

Corner Market, afcAlttatar and Jt Ban Francisco. Cal. 

Hated — December 29. 1909. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 
Thr Ililijn-Amfnran Bank 
For the half year ending December ust. iooq. a dividend has been declared at the rate 
of four (a) per cent per annum on all deposits free of taxes. payable on and after Monday. 
January i. iqio. Dividends not called lor are added to and bear the same rate of interest 
as the principal from January t, iqio. Money deposited on or before January to. will 
Jraw Interest from January i. iqio. 

ANDREA SBARBORO. Present. A. E. SBARBORO. Cashier 

Office — 460 Montgomery street, corner of Sacramento. 

DIVIDEND NOTICE 

The Continental Building and Loan Association 

For thesis months ending December it. iqoq. a dividend has been declared of six 6 

rer cent per annum on term deposit stock and four (4) percent on ordinary or transient 

accounts. 

WM. CORBIN. Secretary. EDWARD SWEENEY President. 

Office — Junction Golden Gate Avenue. Taylor and Market streets. San Francisco. 



PURE MILK FOR BABY. 



Sanitary milk production was first started by Gall Borden in the early 
50s The best systems to-day are largely based on his methods, but 
none are so thorough and so rigidly enforced as the Borden System. Fot 
over fifty years the Eagle Brand Condensed Milk has proved IU claim aa 
the best food for Infants. 



MAYERLES GERMAN EYEWATER LS 

• tltJapl* and tMVfoCtlT ha-.-enle*. tf JUarmdr. for chiltlroa sad 
a-lajta 

orncKCfltcr or PDLici »« 9 rruoN* -n p^ »• r *n ,i« u 

ir* to raoswnm.od to Lb* pabtic Mt . Gaarta MajarU <tWI< 
" Ska Fraaciace I h*ra two aitoa ,-Iaj mn for ih* part twal*« roar* 
and daring that lias* bare rvsaaitod a*T»raJ optieiana aart a at aalil I 
bad cotia»;i*d Mr Otorp ■»»•»!• and had ■<■> ft glaaaaa- to ear *T** 
•Jtd I f*4 aattra «twt»cti*t) ■«•« I wBm*tmttj. 

1 H a JDUMM 5«ra**at af PWke* 
IT IS aUETSLOUS Tar. affact of Ma Tar i*. I Jr. Water ha. baaa 
■ II ill II U« I aaali maaaaa-l it an tt» aaa* af aii rfa r*m-i .«• 
T«m Ualr ■ KEU.T. Ala a* aria Canty Baaartil. Sw Laaaajra Cal 

George Mayerle *•*■"• •"■— txpm% °^ tM - tk ^ m —*" *— *— 

^ W 6 A-iaj-^JI*^ 1 Mill f Qatxiaaa MO lariat Straa*. .paaa.1. rUla ■ 
Phoo. fraakha R7* Saa PtMaMaa aUTttLI S erJUUX ITI WATK&. By Maii. Ms. 




22 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



NINETY-FIFTH HALF-YEARLY REPORT 
of the 

San Francisco Savings Union 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco) 

temporarily located at 
Northwest Corner California and Montgomery Streets 




New building at junction of Grant Avenue with Market and O'Farrell streets, to be complelrd this year. 



deposited on or before January 10 u-ill receive interest from dan nary 1st. 



SWORN STATEMENT 

Of the Condition ami Value of its Assets and Liabilities December SI, 1009. 

ASSETS. 

Loans secured by first lien on Real Estate wholly within the State of California $12,521,204.46 

Loans secured by Pledge and Hypothecation of Approved Bonds and Stocks 1,014,941.35 

Bonds of the Municipalities and School Districts of the State of California, Bailroad Bonds and Bonds 

and Stocks of Local Corporations, the value of which is 9,735,137.40 

Bank Premises 700,000.00 

Other Real Estate in the State of Cali Eornia 613,859.14 

Furniture and Fixtures - 500.00 

Cash in Vault and in Bank 1,800,012.18 



Total Assets $26,385,654.53 

LIABILITIES. 

Due Depositors $24,085,291.63 

Capital Paid-up 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,293,744.00 

General Tax Account. Balance Undisbursed 6,618.90 



Total Liabilities $26,385,654.53 

San Francisco, December 31, 1909. 

(Signed LOVELL WHITE, President. 
(Signed) B. M. WELCH, Cashier. 
STATE OF CALIFORNIA, City and County of San Francisco|ss. 

We do solemnly swear that wc have ( and each of us has) a personal knowledge of the matters contained in the fore- 
going report, and that every allegation, statement, matter and thing therein contained is true, to the best of our know- 
ledge and belief. 

(Signed) LOVELL WHITE. 
(Signed) B. M. WELCH. 
Subscribed and sworn to before me, this 31st day of December, 1909. 
(SEAL) (Signed) FRANK L. OWEN 

Notary Public in and' for the City and County of San Francisco, State of California. 



.Ia\t\ky 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



23 




MOWEM 



ii*£*Bi**~izmBr 



A LONG TOUR ABROAD. 

An ideal European trip of 6,700 miles through England, 
France and Algeria was marie recently by A. Lowes Dickinson, a 
member of the Automobile Club of America, in a 40 h. p. Loco- 
mobile touring ear. On this tour, the owner kept a log book 
which contains much that is of interest to motorists who contem- 
plate making automobile trips abroad — the most delightful man- 
ner of seeing a foreign country. Barring a few bad stretches 
of country, generally good roads were encountered by the Dick- 
inson party. 

Starting at Southampton for a five weeks' trip on British soil, 
the Locomobile took a route through the masses of heather, to 
Castle Malwood (the seat of Lady Harcourt) and the Rufus 
Stone, where William Rufus was killed in the year 1,100, and 
thence onward to Stonycross. Through the Great Forest to 
the Aven Valley, stopping for luncheon at the quaint White 
Hart Inn, at Salisbury, the car proceeded to Amesbury, and 
the big military camp at Bulford, winding up the first day's 
run of 100 miles at the Royal Hotel, Winchester. The remainder 
of the first week was spent in leisurely touring to London, via 
Brighton, St. Leonards, Hythe ; Charing, with its picturesque 
old hal-timbered house, Yew Tree Farm : beautiful Leeds Castle 
mid steep Reigate Hill, the route made famous by coaching- 
parties. 

While at the English metropolis, a number of days were spent 
in making various short and long trips about the city; among 
them being jaunts to Windsor Castle. Baldock, Richmond Park, 
Gad's Hill (home of the late Charles Dickens) and other places 
of note. 

After completing 2,000 miles in England without difficulty, 
Ihc car was shipped to Boulogne, France. Al the latter place, ii 
was necessary to wait four hours for driving licenses, the usual 
lest drive being required, Striking out over the Route Rationale 
and into the Valley of the Somme, the first night stop was mad i 
at Amiens, 70 miles from Boulogne. After spending a morning 
in exploring the Cathedral, the party threaded its way over the 
undulating roads and chalk tableland through Bretenil, Beau- 
\ ;i is. Allone and Mem. at which point the beauty of the country 
became greater. At Conflans, the Seine was crossed for the first 
time, the mule then proceeding through the Pores! de si. Ger- 
main country. 1\i.tq the roads were bail, hut upon reaching 

Suresnes and passing into the Bnis de Boulogne (where duty has 

lo be paid on gasoline) and on lo Paris, tin- road is all that is 

to lie desired. 

From the French capital, jaunts were mad,' through the Cha- 
teau country; St. Cyr, Rambouillet, Voisins, Chartres, 
Prom (be latter place to Chateaudun, the road was excellent and 

straight for miles, permitting maximum sp I. Following an 

exploration of the ancienl Chateau de Blois and nearby spots, 
the Locomobile parti here over t" Tours; then down the Loire 
Valley and Ldgnieres, lunching at inns, and thence driving into 
the I ml re Valley ami southward to historic Poitiers 

Leaving th - p i at tht and early a strenuous tun of 200 
miles innards the Pyrenees was made, anil Agem reached a' 
S:30 in the evening. Several days were then spent journeying 
a few hundred miles through Coarraze. Lourdes. Pan. the Tour- 

luntry, before the Mediterranean was sighted. A \ - 
made to the Maison Carres, the almost perfect specimen of an 
old Roman temple with the old Roman baths nearby and 
down lo A\ ignon. 

The road from here through Aix. Cannes and Nice was un- 
interesting, being much cut up with wine traffic. 
ward the follow!- : the wonderful Corniche D'Or Road, 

along the beautiful country of the Gulf of 9 <ez, and 

through the winding mountains with theii rv. the 

rid<> into Marseilles (1,726 miles from Boulogl 

:ie annoying trouble, occupying several hours, the 
car was loaded onto a steamer and run through I terribly rough 
n about 30 hours. The freight rate 



francs for a ear weighing 3,910 pounds, and the transportation 
company charges 100 francs additional for insurance, but as 
there is great doubt as lo what it actually covers, it is better to 
insure through Lloyds, which can be done for one-quarter of 
one per cent. There are several lines by which a ear can be car- 
ried to Algiers, 

Five weeks were spenl in Algeria by the party, visiting both 
known and remote parts of this strange section of the world, 
upon which notes in the log book of the Loeo are quite lengthy 
and would till a small-sized book. The return trip was made 
via Marseilles, and then direct to Havre in six days. 

The following statement of running cost, kept very accurately, 
gives a fair idea of what an owner has to spend to take his fam- 
ily abroad on a 6,700 mile trip, with a goodly powered car such 
as a Locomobile "Forty," which stands up and gets the expedi- 
tion there and back: 

Cost per Mile Rim. 

In France and 
In England, 30 Algeria, 47 
running days, running days, 
2,000 miles. 4,700 miles. 

Gasoline $ .031 .0490 

Oil 0093 .0063 

Repairs and spare parts 0069 .0065 

Supplies and sundries 0045 .0039 

Garage, cleaning, etc 0176 .0142 

Tire expenses 0786 .0729 

Licenses 0070 .0049 

Chauffeur's board and expenses 0446 .0294 



.20 .1877 

Freight, England to France and 

France to Algiers and back .0381 

Total cost per mile 30 .2258 

Number of gallons used, 215; miles per gallon on gasoline used, 
9.3. 

Hotel expenses, leaving out of account Paris and Nice, where 
any price may be paid, averaged throughout France and Al- 
geria, $4 per day each. This included wine, tips and all ex- 
penses, and in every case rooms containing two beds, which are 
inure expensive. Motorists are always charged a higher rale 
than other travelers. The chauffeur's expenses averaged -$1.75 
:i day, 

» * * 

Gas Generator Accidents— Explosion 

All gas. whether it be generatl lOrtable 

purposes, or in any form for use in the household, is a dang 

osed by the owner to care properly for 
it, and to see that it is a matter of constant personal insp 
if Left to care-taker or chauffeur. 

Acetylene nor? are no more dangerous than any other 

class of . and if goi is expected from them they 

must Ik.' kepi in good condition all 

Never let S generator go unattended for days after it has been 
used. If residue carbide, through lack of care, has caked to 
ipe it out with a file or any old piece 
of metal. You may be inviting an accident. The residuum of 
acetylene carbide attacks the copper of the vessel and makes 
i new chemical agent, and this is known as acetyl-id of cop- 
per. This is highly explosive. Ca- en known when' 
'ending the copper tubes leading from generator bo lamp have 
given ■ iloeiona of a more or less startling character. In 
striking the hard-caked substances the explosion is 
hound to be more serious in result, and has often left its scars 
in burnt hands and faces. Do not delay cleaning too long after 
using, and in cleaning, do so with a sharpened piece of wood, or, 
if yen will use metal, try it under water. It would be well to 
bear the above in mind, and rake no chances cleaning residue 
encrusted generators with sharp metal tools and being blown lo 
kingdom come by striking the silicons a\ 
on .arhide. This is a "don't" it would be 

* • * 

In preparation for an increased output of 1911 
• < ampany of Buffalo has .round an 
contracts for a large addition to its plant. The new building 
will be of cement. 850x100 feet, and three stor 
■ ntaiii the m department, tool. 
small nbly. On the completion, the compan 
feet of f 



S4 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



The Importance to Owners of the After Con- of Automobiles. 

In these days, when the high state of perfection to which 
the automobile has been brought renders the distinction between 
makes less marked than formerly, it is a matter of no small 
moment to the purchaser whether or not the interest of the dealer 
ceases with the completion of the sale. 

While there are still many points of difference which affeel 
the individual choice of a car, due to the preference of the 
purchaser in such matters as capacity, speed or some character- 
istic lines of the model, yet it is a fact that the essential differ- 
ences between the various makes of the same grade is so slight as 
to be almost negligible. 

It is, then, in the matter of after-care at the hands of the 
dealer that che prospective purchaser should act with caution 
and assure himself that the reputation of the dealer for the 
fulfillment of his promises is unimpeachable. Time was when 
many cars were sold much alter the historic plan of the itinerant 
razor peddler, who. upon complaint that his razors did not cut. 
remarked, ingeniously, that they were not made to cut but to 
sell. 

The second-hand garages throughout the country are full of 
inferior cars, sold by irresponsible dealers, who washed their 
hands of the whole transaction once they were in receipt of the 
price, ft is no secret that certain cars have been sold in one 
district after another, moving their field of activity to some 
new community, when their rietims became so clamorous that 
the game was up. In this manner they were assured of a cer- 
tain amount of business as long as they could find virgin terri- 
inrv where their record was unknown, and where lavish adver- 
tising gave them, for a time, some degree of standing. 

But those days are gone forever. The automobile buying pub- 
lic has grown wise to that game and refuse to bite. Dealers 
are therefore on a sound and equal footing for cars of equal 
grade, but none the less, the promises of after care are as varying 
in value as are the high-grade cars and the rattletrap machines 
of the sell-and-skip gentry just described. 

Assure yourself, therefore, as to just what is meant by the 
dealer's promises of after-care, and what is the character of the 



dealer for integrity in the matter of their fulfillment. After all, 
the value of a guarantee is no greater than the sincerity of its 
maker. 



Doming Events in the. Automobile World. — American Shows, 
Meetings, Etc. 

Jan. 8-15 — New York City, Madison Square Garden, Tenth 
National Show, Association of Licensed Automobile Manufac- 
turers. 

Jan. 17-22 — Philadelphia, Second Uegiment Armory, Auto- 
mobile Show. J. H. Beck. Secretary, 210 Odd Fellows Building. 

.fan. 24-29— Detroit, Wayne Hotel Gardens, Third Annual 
Automobile Show, Detroit Auto Dealers' Association. John Gil- 
lispie, Manager, Hotel Tuller. 

Feb. 5-12 — Chicago, Coliseum, Ninth Annual Automobile 
Show, National Association of Automobile Manufacturers. S. 
A. .Miles, General Manager. 

Feb. 1-1-19— Buffalo, N. Y., Broadway Arsenal, Eighth An- 
nual Automobile Show, Automobile Club of Buffalo. Dai H. 
Lewis, Manager, 760 Main street. 

Feb. 19-26 — Newark, N. J., Essex Troop Armory, Automobile 
Show, New Jersey Exhibition Company. 

Feb. 21-26 — Binghampton. N. Y., State Armory, Automobile 
Show. E. W. Whipple, Secretary. 

Feb. 22-26— Kansas City, Mo„ Convention Hall, Fourth An- 
nual Automobile Show. 

March 5-12 — Boston, Mechanics' Building, Eighth Annual 
Automobile Show, Boston Automobile Dealers' Association. 
Chester I. Campbell, Genera! Manager, 5 Park Square. 

March 19-26— Buffalo, N. Y., Convention Hall, Third Annual 
Power Boat and Sportsmen's Show. D. H. Lewis, Manager. 

American Races, Hill Climbs. Etc. 

Dec. 22-30 — Philadelphia. Fourth Annual Midwinter Endur- 
ance Contest. Quaker City Motor Club. 

Feb. 4-0 — New Orleans, Annual Mardi Gras Speed Carnival, 
New Orleans Automobile Club. 




READRITE Meters show the exad 
condition of your batteries. 

We supply each instrument with a 
written GUARANTEE for ONE YEAR 
againsl inaccuracy, imperfeel workman- 
ship or inferior material. 

PRICE LIST 



Voltmeters 



03. 8 or 12 Volls 



0-30 Amps 



Ammeters 



Volt-Ammeters 



0-8 Volls (Sfan.Ranee) 



0-30 Amps. 



r 



> 0-30 Amps. 



*3.00 
$2.50 

$3.50 

H.no 



Little Wonder Vulcanizer 

The Little Wonder Vulcanizer made in all sizes to fit all makes of 
tires is the only small vulcanizer having detachable moulds which fit the 
tire from rim to rim perfectly. This feature prevails in large vulcanizers- 




This Vulcanizer will repair Small Guts, Nail Holes. Bruises, and any trouble with 
outside casing, before (be cut has been in the tire. Price $6-00. 




Catarad 

Auto-Vehicle 

Washer 

Will wish vehicles be- 
ween spokes, under 
fenders and all over. 



NO OTHER WASHER WILL DO IT. 



PRICE $1.50 



FOR WASHING— Automobiles, Carriaees. Hacks. Delivery Wagons— In fad. all 
vehicles thai musl be kept clean. 




The Barco 

Chime Horn 



Price Complete 

With No. 5 or 6 valve $ 9.00 
" " 8 valve 9.S0 

" " 10 valve 12.50 



PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 



EXCLUSIVE COAST DISTRIBUTORS 



50 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



LJciAzlcm 




Scientific simplification characterizes the 
OAKLAND throughout. It has fewer 
working parts than any other motor car, 
and is a masterly example of what unit 
construction means to the automobile 
world. 

It will out perform, out-wear, out-do in 
every way any car of its price and horse- 
power and most cars of vastly higher-price 
and rating. 



COME IN AND LET US DEMONSTRATE 
IT TO YOU. 



S. G. Chapman 



Telephone Park 6475. 



324 Van Ness Ave. 



Sometime, somewhere, someone MAY 
make an automobile the equal of the 

Buick 



But never will any-one, any-where, any- 
time produce a better one. 

The BUICK holds more worlds records than 
any other car on earth, regardless of price- 
Consider BUICK Quality, then look at BUICK 
price. 



Bulck "White Streak" - $1160 

Bulck-30 .... 1550 

Bulck-40 .... 1J00 

Buick-60 7 passenger - 2900 
All F. O. B. S. F. 



Get immediate deliveries now while you can. 



Howard Automobile Co. 



Pacific Coist Distributors 



523-533 Golden Gate Ave. 



Phones: Market 1536 
HomeJ2.M3 



The Winter's Sensation 




This Morgan & Wright Tire 
WILL NOT SKID 



Wein&ock, Nichols Co. 



569 GOLDEN GATE AVE. 



SAN FRANCISCO 



BRIGHTEN UP FOR THE 
:: :: HOLIDAYS :: :: 



If you are particular about 
the appearance of your 
car at this time of the year, 
—and you should be— see 
us about painting it. Our 
ideas and suggestions in 
painting an automobile are 
vastly different from those 
of others. 



:: Elite Auto Company :: 

AL MORRIS 677 Golden Gate Ave. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8. 1910. 



Mr. Ira D. Lundy, Stoddard-Dayton agent for Seattle, has 
written The Diamond Eubber Company he is particularly well- 
pleased with the use of the new Diamond Grip Tires on his car. 
He writes that not only does he do away with tire chains, but 
that the tires are not so easily punctured and stand up much 
better under hard usage than any other type in a hilly city like 
Seattle. 




™ t OAKLAND CUP. 



Fourteen out of fifteen automobiles in the Portola road races 
used Monogram oils. Does this mean anything to you? Moore 
Motor Supply Co., Los Angeles, San Francisco and Oakland. 



Ivan L. de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



Golden Gate Ave. and Van Ness, San Francisco 



"OIL IS CHEAPER THAN FRICTION 




EASTERN S\ I I 

AUTOMOBILE UIL 

EFFICIENT NON-CARBONIZING ECONOMICAL 



Ask your garage. California Compounding Company. San 
Jose, Pacific Coast Distributors. 



.1 Fine Record. 

With the close of 1909, Harrison has established a sales record 
for the Peerless which has never before been equaled. In a re- 
markably fine year for the automobile industry, Harrison has 
made a great record. He has been unable to secure enough Peer- 
less cars, and has made a decided hit in the high-priced line. 
When he saw himself facing a peculiar situation when his show 
rooms would have no cars in them, Harrison took steps to secure 
other agencies. His Peerless output was sold. He wanted other 
ears. A trip East was necessary. 

On the day that Judge Hough rendered the decision making 
valid the Selden patents, H. 0. Harrison was visiting George 
B. Seidell at the beautiful home of the veteran manufacturer in 
Rochester, X. Y. Harrison was the first autoist in America to 
congratulate Mr. Selden. 

Quick action came after the news of the decision. Harrison 
came away from Rochester with a contract for fifty Selden cars, 
and with the agency for the entire Pacific Coast in his possession. 
He has already sold seven Selden cars. 

More than three months ago it became necessary for Harri- 
son to take on still another line. He went East on a secret mis- 
sion. Visiting every factory turning out low-priced cars, and 
after spending a week at the Everitt factory, decided on that 
car. Harrison tried the Everitt in every possible way, then, 
he telegraphed to San Francisco a characteristic message, which 
read: 

"Everitt is 0. K. I've given her a real pounding and the 
car has made good. Think she will be a hummer. Have signed 
contract." 

» • * 

The Demountable Rim. 

"Demountable rims are growing in favor with motorists. The}' 
Offer advantages, not only in racing, but in every day service 
and touring," said James A. Braden, of the Diamond Rubber 
Company. And it is true that- many of the large tire manufac- 
turers are pushing demountable rims for this season. By 1911 
such equipment will be very common. It means, in substance, a 
fresh tire any time it is needed, and with no hard work. The de- 
mountable rim goes a step farther than the quick detachable rim. 

"Suppose," said the Diamond tire man, "you find yourself on 
the road with a punctured tire, but your car is equipped with 
Demountable rims — your extra tire will be pumped up, ready 
for running. There's nothing to do but remove the damaged 
tire, rim and all, of course. 

"Jack up the wheel. With socket wrench unscrew the mi is 
on the bolts in the felloe, loosening the wedges in the same op- 
eration. Pull the tire toward von. rim and all. and let the valve 
stem drop out of its hole in the felloe. 

"To put on the fresh tire which, you understand, is carried all 
inflated and ready on your extra rim, slip its valve stem through 
the hole in the felloe, and the rim slides easilv to place upon the 
wheel. Put the wedges oyer the felloe bolts, apply the nuts, screw 
no tight, ami — so ahead." 

* * * 

The aeroplane chauffeur may be a temperance man and 

yet take a drop too much. 



Tor 20 years the KELLY- 
SPRINGFIELD TIRE has 
had the reputation of 
being the best carriage 
tire on the market. 

We are now manufactur- 
ing an AUTOMOBILE 
TIRE known as the 

KELLY- 
SPRLNGFIELD 

Every tire guaranteed. 




The 

Consolidated 
Rubber Tire 

Company 

507 Howard Street 
San Francisco. 

Pacific Coait Manager 
CHAS. W. FLINT 



JANUARY 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



27 



STATEMENT 
of the Condition and Value of the Assets and Liabilities of 

The Hibernia 
Savings and Loan Society 

(A CORPORATION) 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco) 

DATED DECEMBER 81, 1909 

ASSETS. Corporation, and are payable to it at its office, which is situ- 

ated as aforesaid, and the payment thereof is secured by 
1— Bonds of the United States ($8,585,000.00), of the District 

pledge and hypothecation of Bonus of Railroad and Quasi- 

of Columbia guaranteed by the United States Government 

Public Corporations and other securities. 

($475,000.00), of the State of California i $650,000.00), of the 

6 — (a) Real Estate situated in the City and County of San 

City and County of San Francisco ($027,700.00), and County 

Francisco ($245,192.86), and in the Counties of Santa Clara 

and Municipal Bonds of the State of California ($876,000.00), 

($23,107,29), Alameda ($261.21), and San Mateo ($2,269.92), 

the actual value of which is $13,402,111.47 

in tiiis State and actual value of which is .' 270,831.28 

2 — Cash in United States Gold and Silver Coin and Checks 2,123,312.12 

3— Miscellaneous Bonds, the actual value of which is 6,031,690.30 (b)— The Land and Building in which said Corporation 

keeps its said office, the actual value of which is 1.049,217.78 

They are: $21,557,113.89 The con(Jition of saia Real Estate is that H belongs Co 

"San Francisco and North Pacific Railway Company 5 per saiu uorpomUon| and part or it is productlve . 

cent Bonds'' ($469,000,00), "Southern Pacific Branch Rail- 7-Contingent Fund-Interest due and uncollected 

way Company of California 6 per cent Bonds" ($266,000.00), Qn ,„. on , issmy , lotes $171,440.36 

"San Francisco and San Joaquin Valley Railway Company 6 ^^ ^^ ^ ^ ^ payab]e Qn ^.^ 

per cent Bonds" ($108,000.00), "Northern California Railway S(iltes a])d other Bomls ,27,641.82 

Company 6 per cent Bonds" ($83,000.00), "Northern Railway Proportion of Taxes for the Fiscal Year 1909- 

Company of California 5 per cent Bonds" ($29,000.00), m „ L . nargeable to ne]rt ycar 21,550.30 320,632.48 

"Market Street Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds" ($858,- 

000.00), "Market Street Railway Company first Consolidated TotaJ Assets $56 988 415 32 

Mortgage 6 per cent Bonds" ($753,000.00), "Los Angeles 

Pacific Railroad Company of California Refunding 5 per cent LIABILITIES. 

Bonds" ($400,000.00), "Los Angeles Railway Company of 1 - Sa,d Corporation owes Deposits amounting to and the 

California 6 per cent Bonds" ($334,000.00). "Powell street ■ tuaJ niae "< whi ' ,|, is $52,201,493.60 

Railway Company 6 per cent bonds" ($186,000.00); "The 2— Accrued Interest— Interest due and uncollected on 

Omnibus Cable Company 6 per cent Bonds" ($167,000.00), Promissory Notes $171,440.34 

"Sutter Street Railway Company 6 per cent Bonds" Interest Accrued but not yet payable on United 

($150,000.00). "Ferries and Cliff House Railway Company 6 States and Other Bonds 127,641.82 299,082.18 

per cent Bonds" ($6,000.00), "The Merchants' Exchange 1 3-Taxes-P,opo, tion ot Taxes for the nasal V.a, UKW-MIO 

pet cent Bonds" ($1,490,000.00), "San Francisco Qas and chargeable to next yeai 21,550.30 

101,, trie Company 4 Va per cent Bonds" ($474,000.00). . .„ 

4— Reserve Fund, Actual Value 3,466,289.24 

4 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the 

actual value of which is 32,745,115.21 

Total Liabilities $55,988,415.32 

THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS ANI' LOAM SOCL 
The condition of said Promlssorj Notes and debts Is as By James r. KELLY. President 

follows: Thej tire all existing Contracts, owned by said the HIBERNIA savings AND loan SOCIETY. 

Corporation, and are payable to it at its otlico. which is situ- By K. M- TOB1K - 

ated at the corner of Market. McAllister and Jones 

,. , . STATU OP CALIFORNIA, City and County of San Fra 

In the City and County ot San Francisco. State ol Cal n;i, 

, , , . _ JAMES R. KELLY and K. M. ToUIN. I ,y sworn, ■ 

and the payment thereof is secured by bust Mortgagee on 

1 , __ ..... . e , ,. himself, says: That said JAMES R. KELLY and that said R. 

Real Estate within this State. Said Promissory Notes are 

, . M TOBIN Is Secretary "1 THE HIBERNIA SAVINGS AND LOAN 

kept and help by said Corporation at its said office, which 

, , , ... , , , SOCIETY, the Corporation above mentioned, and that the foregoing state- 

Is its principal place ol business. ,ii,l said Notes and I 'el, is 

I is true. 
are I hero situated. 

JAMES ft KELLY. President. 
5 — Promissory Notes and the debts thereby secured, the 

tary. 

actual value of which IS 45,504.67 

scribed and sworn to before me th 
condition of said Promlssorj Notes ind CHARLES T. STANLEY. Notarj Pui.li, in and for the City and 

iollows: They are all existing Contracts, owned incisco. State of California. 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage Renti ng- 



Supplies Machinist 



MOTOR CAR SERVICE CO. 

J. W. PEARSON, General Manager 

Market and Van Ness 



The fines! Motor Car 
Station in the World." 



Phone Market 1705 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Roaenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Nest and Golden Gate. Phone Franklin 1535 



Golden Gale School of 
Automobile Engineering 


Automobile 
Clearing House 




A. GLLCREST 


419-425 Larkin Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 


San Francisco. Cal 


1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 


SSI 


= S. G. RAYL 


i) Northern California Representative 


^^MS&cS^Ay 


— RRS.Sfll ttolripn Rate 4vp. 


San Francisco. 



"Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar 

Durocar Automobile Company 



of San Francisco 



38 Van Ness Avenue 




Expert Work on Auto 
Tires and Tubes. 

Compressed Air on 
Tap at the Curbing 



PHONE 

FRANKLIN 3727 



616-618 
VAN NESS AVENUE 



SPLITDORF MAGNETO 

Recognized Everywhere as the 

Leading Magneto 

Ask any user. 
C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch, 520 Van Ness Ave. 



thomu B. JefTery it Compajiy. 117-126 Valencia St., San Francisco 



An Air-Cvolcd Engine. 

Covering the course of the "mile-high" hill climb at Eedlands, 
Cal., recently, with a 6-eylinder .Franklin touring car, Ralph C. 
Hamlin, of Los Angeles, arrived at the summit with the motor 
of his car so cool that by-standers at the finish held their hands 
upon the engine without burning them. 

From the business district of Kedlands the course of fifteen 
miles runs up to Casa Blanca, winding through orange groves 
and gardens, drops into a canyon and then begins a long, steady 
ascent toward the clouds of the snow-capped peaks. This is said 
to be the steepest hill-climb course in the West, 

Mr. Hamlin's ear was one of the 1910 model, its engine hav- 
ing the latest development in air cooling. In it, Mr. Hamlin 
took seven passengers and drove to the top at a high rate of 
speed. \\ hen the end was reached, he raised the hood of the car. 
and it was upon his invitation that the several dealers in water- 
cooled motor cars handled the engine without burning them- 
selves. 

Dr. H. B. Mclntyre, of the Presidio, has purchased a Stevens- 
Duryea runabout. Mr. 1'. C. Huntington gets a short-coupled 
Stcvens-Duryea car. Mrs. M. J. O'Connor has purchased her 
second Woods Electric, which she presented to her daughter for 
Christinas. 

The rapid development of the aeroplane has brought a de- 
mand for a special magneto to insure a constant, never-failing 
spark in the light, powerful and compact motors used to drive 
their air machines. Lavalette & Co., makers of the Eisemann 
Magneto, have brought out a new magneto built especially for 
use in aeronautic work, which is lighter than those used in motor 
ears, though every bit as powerful. Part of the instrument is 
made of aluminum, and the heaviest model weighs only 16% 
pounds, while the lightest of the four-cylinder type weighs but 
11 pounds. The company is now in a position to furnish from 
stock live different styles of this new magneto. 

Mr. C. E. Mathewson, Pacific Coast manager of the Diamond 
Rubber Company, is particularly pleased with the way the new 
Diamond Grip Casing is appealing to discerning automobile 
owners, and reports deliveries of twenty-six of this type to con- 
sumers in the last few days at the San Francisco branch alone. 
When it is taken into consideration that the branches at Seattle, 
Portland, Tacoma and Spokane also report exceptional sales of 
this type, it will be seen that the Diamond Rubber Company have 
in it a very valuable anti-skidding device. 

* * * 

Charles S. Howard, of ihe Howard Automobile Company, has 
gone lo Los Angeles to look after the interests of the Los An- 
geles branch of that concern, who are Pacific Coast Distributors 
of Bunks and Oldsmobiles. Howard was accompanied by Wm. 
Powers, the well-known salesman, who has been connected with 
the San Francisco sales department of that firm for the past 
year. Il is understood that Powers will remain in the Southern 
City for a month at least, his services there becoming urgently 

i led l'\ the unusual and early activity in the sales of Buick 

automobiles. 

* * * 

•lames E. Bayliss, who has become connected with the How- 
ard Automobile Company's selling force is one of the oldest and 
most experienced of the automobile contingent, having spent 
years in the business in the East. He dales back to the early 
steam days, and has followed the business through its various 
stages, having represented various large factories both as travel- 
ing representative ami as retail representative in the East and 
central West, lie comes here from the Buick agency in Portland, 
ami will exert his energies on the Oldsmobile line. 

* * * 

So devoted to motoring has Miss Blanche Bates become thai 
a few days ago she placed an order with E. P. Brinegar, Presi- 
dent of the Pioneer Automobile Company, lor a Chalmers-] let roil 
"in" roadster, to be delivered to her home in Ossering, .\eu 
York, as soon as it can be turned out from the factory. Miss 
Bates created quite a stir among autoists last spring when she 
purchased a handsome Thomas Flyer, so complete in equipment 
that it is a veritable palace on wheels. 

* * * 

.Mr. "Morris Kind, of the Santa Cruz-Portland Dement Com- 
pany, has just had the big jinricksha wheels of his Oldsmobile 
equipped with the new Diamond Crip Tires. 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



29 




"If you had to study when vou were a boy as hard as I've 

got to study," grumbled young Quillback, over his arithmetic, 
"you might have made your mark in the world long ago." "I 
don't think I'm too old to make a few marks yet, my son," re- 
marked the elder Quillback, reaching behind the bookcase for the 
family rawhide. 

"So," said the head of the firm, "you want your salary 

raised?" "Yes," the boy timidly replied. "What makes yon 
think your value to this company has been increased?" "Well, 
de baseball season's over, and I'll be here a good deal more regu- 
lar now." — Chicago Record-Herald. 

"To-morrow will be my birth-day," remarked the fair 

typewriter maid, "and I'm going to take a day off." "Huh !" 
sneered the book-keeper, who had loved and lost, "whv don't you 
take five years off. as you did the last time you had a birthday?" 
— Chicago Daily News. 

Credit Man — Do you consider Hobson a careful financial 

manager? Reporter — Most assuredly. Why, since the Eemsen 
Board declared that benzoate of soda was a harmless preservative 
he insists on putting some in his pocketbook every morning. — 
Pud: 

Clancy — Oi'm after a ticket, ter Chicago. Ticket Agent — 

Bo you want an excursion ticket? One that will take you there 
and back ? Clancy — Phwat's the sinse of me payin' ter go there 
an' back whin Oi'm here alriddy? — Hotel Register. 

"You can't eet something for nothing 1 in this life," said 

the ready made philosopher. ''No," answered Mr. Lamhkinson. 
"I can't. But the chaps T have done business with in Wall street 
seem to manage it." — Washington Star. 

"Talk about your realism: this show looks awful natural 

to me." "How now?" "Six months have elapsed since the play 
started, and the housemaid hasn't done anv housework yet." — 
Louisville ('mirier Journal. 

"You will admit that a court is a necessity,? said the 

judge. "Yes." answerer] the audacious attorney. "But I don't 
like to be so frequentlv reminded of the adage, 'Necessity knows 
no law.' " — Washington Star. 

"It must be extremely gratifying to you, Mrs. Childers, to 

have your daughters all settled in life." "Yes, indeed. Thank 
goodness, the dear girls are all happily divorced." — Boston 
Transcript. 

"I'm sorry to hear your mule died, 

Sam. "Oh, it's all right, boss," ho returned 
got 1 no kick coming." — Lippincott's. 



1 said to Happy 
resignedly. "I ain't 



A CYNIC. 

Mrs. Florence Kelly, the new vice-Presidenl of the National 

Suffrage Association, said in a recent suffrage address in New 

York : 

"Too many rn*n take the pessimistic-- view of woman suffrage 
thai ;i young cynic at a bridge party took of marriage. 

" 'Are vnu lucky at cards?* a lady asked him. 

"'Oli, very lucky; T always win.' said he. 

'"How about love?" she went on. archly, 

" 'Just as luekv.' be replied. 'T always lose.'" 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco. 920 Merchants' 

Kxehange Building, calls the attention of the public to their 
Free Labor Bureaus, located at No. 170 Turk street. San Fr.in- 
ind 804 Broadway. Oakland. All classes of male help fur- 
nished absolutely free both to employer and employee. 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros.. 246 W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dam* 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. Road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE — Osen & Hunter Auto Co., 1st and Si. James Sts. Tel 
Main 38. The San Jose home of the "Mitchell Family." 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE — San Jose Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgrs. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Buick and O'.ds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE— Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE — Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner In California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. Tlce, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVILLE. — J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

HEALDSBURG— HOTEL SOTOYOME, J. McDonough, Prop. Only first 
class hotel in the city. Electricity throughout. Free sample rooms. Hot 
and cold water in every room. Baths with suites. Special attention to 
auto parties. Phone Main 60. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobile Engineers, Machlnlete and Blackemltha. 
271 Valencia Street, (an Franclaco. Telephone Market 198» 



THORPE'S 

ILLUSTRATED 

ROAD MAPS TOUR BOOK 

The only Map which shows actual 
PHOTOS of Forks.TurnsiCross Roads 

pu.. nv THORPE ENGRAVING COLA 



PACIFIC 

MOTOR SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

Oakland, Calif. 
Northern Distributors 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
845 Van Ness Ave. Phone Market B«78. 



Vulcanizing 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phona Market M70. 



42 Van Neaa Avenue. 



San Franclaco. Cat. 



Phone Park 6544 



L. J. Carl. Manaeer 



Auto Top Manufacturing Co. 

Automobile and Carriage Trimmings 



491 Golden Gate Avenue 



San Francisco. Cal. 



Near Polk 



H^HH 5000 

means that every AJAX TIRE is guaranteed for 5000 miles or 200 I 
days' service. Write for a copy of the Guarantee. 

\MXGRIEB RUBBER CO.. Broadway & 570) St.. New York Sen Francisco Branca: I 

I Factories: Trenion N.J. . Branches and Afeocies hi 12 otiev 544 Van Neaa Are. I 



henna 



TRY one 



For Those Seeking 
QUALITY 
NOT PRICE 

Htr.Hsnv A XFRTON 

Factory Rcprescatamea 

:ir.inV«t.t SaaFraMBara 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St., San Francisco 



Yosemite Valley 




OPEN ALL WINTER 

A panorama of ethereal winter beauty, 
beyond description. 

WINTER SPORTS-SLEIGHING— SKAT- 
ING- TOBOGGANING, 



Join one of the Winter Excursion Parties. 

Daily train service, and the fine tourist hotel 
at the Park Line and in Yosemite, make it a 
quick, comfortable trip at any time. 

See GEO. F. MILLER, Genl. Agt., 884 and 673 Market St, S. F. 



Santa Fe 



3 trains 



H^ievery day 



Kansas City— Chicago 



AND POINT 
EAST 



EASTERN EXPRESS 

Leave San Francisco 7:15 a.m. Leave Oakland 7:40 a.m. 

OVERLAND EXPRESS 

Leave San Francisco and Oakland 8 p. m. 

CALIFORNIA LIMITED 

Leave San Francisco and Oakland 10:00 p. m. 
Courteous Employes Unique Scenery Harvey Meal Service 

Jas. B. Duffy, General Agent 

673 Market St., San Francisco 

T.LOVE.T. A.. Market St. Ferry Depol.S. F. J.J.WARNER. G.A..lll2Broadway,OakJand 



A IPsdlaiaftk IR.®iBn«iJHi<s® WnttDn a 



"Suppose," said he. "that we sit out this (lance?" 

"For myself," said she, "I should prefer it." 

"There is," said he, "in the next room a number of botanical 
specimens that are rather interesting. Shall we go and examine 
them?" 

And as they go off together, we will discreetly follow the pair, 
noting them with a modicum of care and a pinch or two of curi- 
ous circumspection. 

She (then) was prim, with a direct glance, a ready tongue and 
a mild measure of sarcasm. She had a way of looking over the 
assembly as though on the watch for delinquencies, and she al- 
ways sat with both feet on the floor. In other words, a school- 
ma'am enjoying an hour of ease. 

He had a fine large forehead, and the lips of mathematical 
precision. His nose was thin, as though from repeated whettings 
on the grindstone of knowledge, and when his hands weren't 
clasped behind him, they were clasped before him. He was, 
moreover, heavily spectacled — in short, a young professor taking 
air. 

And having thus inscribed the tablets of memory, we will open 
once more the ears of an incurious philosophy and take a little 
thought with ourselves upon the sequences. 

"This, I believe," said she, looking at one of the botanical 
specimens, "is a Geranium Robertianum." 

He looked at her with admiration. 

"I thought," he said, "that you might be misled on account 
of the malformation of the calyx." 

"The stigmatic idiosyncrasies are unmistakable," said she, 
"and the petals and stamens are clearly hypogynous." 

"The stamens, of course." he remarked, "could also be de- 
scribed as monadelphous." 

They looked at each other with increasing pleasure. 

"Have you ever taken up geometry?" he asked. 

She smiled as a coquette might smile upon being questioned it' 
her flirtations were really dangerous. 

"You try me and see," she challenged. 

"Briefly," said he, "what is a surface?" 

Whereupon she answered him, saying: 

"A surface is a singly infinite system of lines or system of lines 
depending upon one variably parameter." 

"And InAv would you obtain the equation of the surface?" 

"By eliminating the parameter between the two equations of 
the line." 

"And if the lines all pass through a given point; what then?" 

"Then the surface is a cone." 

"And, in particular, if the lines arc all parallel to a given line; 
what then?" 

"In that event," said she, "the surface is a cylinder." 

They looked at each other and each of them blushed a little. 

"It is surprising," said he at las*', "how much we have in com- 
mon." 

Embarrassed still, he doffed his spectacles and began to polish 
them. 

"I heard the subject of thin lenses summed up in a masterly 
manner the other day," said he. 

She leaned forward as eagerly as a bargain shopper might lean 
forward upon being told of fine fur coats for $5. 

"What was it?" she breathlessly asked. 

"A thin lens," he repeated, "increases or decreases by a definite 
quantity the convergence or divergence of all rays which pass 
through it." 

They sat then for a time in silence. 

"Don't you think," he asked, "it was splendidly put?" 

She touched his hand with an unconsciously impulsive move- 
ment. 

"I think it was grand," she whispered. 

They smiled at. each other shyly through their spectacles, and 
somehow he retained her hand in his. and somehow neither 
of them seemed to know it. 

"Do you read Maeterlinck?" he murmured. 

And after a long pause she murmured : "Yes : do yon ?" 

The sound of the piano came to them faintly from (he other 
room. 



January 8, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



"I cannot suppose," she said at last, "that you had music in 
your curriculum?" 

"At one time," he answered, "it was even prophesied that I 
would be an infant Brahms." 

"Do you like Chopin?" she asked. 

"You recognize his waltz?" said ho. "it is his opus 34. 
Chopin, of course, was a Pole turned Parisian. His technical 
characteristics were a negative bravura, absolute perfection' of 
finger play and of the legatissinio touch and the exclusion of 
high relief and point. His wonderfully poetic cantabiles " 

And as for the young professor, his voice died dreamily away, 
and he made no noise. The waltz ended. 

"I think," said she, "that we must now return " 

And again they looked at each other. She smiled. 

"Your eyes," he whispered, "are as blue — as blue." 

And suddenly then they kissed each other, a little primly, per- 
haps, and a little properly perhaps, but nevertheless they kissed 
each other — these two kindred souls — most sweetly and most 
fairly on the lips. — New York Evening Sun. 



TO OUR SHAME BE IT SAID. 

The January, or Holiday Number, of the Overland Monthly, 
is late to get to the news-stands, but when it does, which will be 
soon, it will be a revelation. It has an array of writers such as 
have rarely figured in any magazine. Prince Hayashi, Count 
Okuma, Count Kaneto, and other notables and nobles of ancient 
Samurai lineage, hold forth about Japan in this issue of the 
standard Western magazine. 

Madame Yuzei Osaki, the very clever wife of the Mayor of 
Tokio, contributes an article on the classics of Japan, dealing 
incidentally with the writings of one Ono No Komachi, who is 
Japan's great female poet. This article is illustrated by one of 
the greatest of Japan's artists. 

The whole number will surprise the magazine reader gen- 
erally, and the illustrations will give one an idea of the stupen- 
dous undertaking of the management. Tt is a full and complete 
exposition of the advance of the Island Empire along modern 
lines. The magazine is dedicated to a "better understanding." 
Certainly no one could devise a better way of reaching the people 
of the United States with a knowledge of Japan, which is now, 
be it said to our shame, so sadly lacking. 



.4 SPOILED CLIMAX. 

Actors and actresses sometimes meet with strange interrup- 
tions in their most thrilling scenes. 

Richard Mansfield used to tell grimly of a performance of 
"A Parisian Romance" in San Francisco. He was al hi 

be would say, that night. He carried the entire audience with 

him. And when his great climax came, when he lifted the lasi 
glass of champagne to his lips, and his Pace twitched, and Ids 

hand and arm shook convulsively, splashed the wine in all direc- 
tions, there was a profound ailence, a thrilling horror in the 
house. 

In this tense, breathless moment a man in the gallery wis 
beard to cry out in fierce indignation: 

" 'IToly Moses! Who was that spit in my c\ 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 



Any married woman will tell you that her husband never 

grumbles around the house — when he is away. 



ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS 

Goodyear Rubber Co. 

R. H. PEASE, President 

587-589-591 Market Street, at Second 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets. San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



A Pair of Japanese Spaniels 



TOY SPANIELS OF JAPAN 
MALE AND FEMALE- 
OWNER IS TRAVELING AND 
CANNOT KEEP THEM- 
MUST SELL. 



Enquire Box A, 



Care San Francisco News Letter, 
San Francisco, Calif. 



773 Market Street, 



-Do You Want Health?- 



Take a Course of Baths at 
PASO ROBLES HOT SPRINGS 

The curative hot sulphur and mud baths, the warm dry air and 
the bright sunshine, all combine for the restoring of health. Then, 
add the comforts of a modern hotel— good baths, good things to 
eat, SERVICE. Low round trip railroad rates. Summer rates 
still in effect. Write for details to 

F. W. SAWYER, Director, 
Paso Robles Hot Springs, Paso Robles, Cal. 

'Anyone can get well here"— Admiral Robley D. Evans. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 

Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately. 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601. 

Mark Lane, Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 245 Bush St. 
Phone Kearny 2629. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged: manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a, m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone "West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevius, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
cIbco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlenelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
205-206 Westbank Building, 830 Market street. San Francisco. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 
People's Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United 
States at the hotels and residences in Oakland. Alameda and Berkeley. 
Special attention to trans-bay baggage. Phones Oakland 4447; Alameda 
456; Berkeley 14; San Francisco, Kearny 579. 

Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street between 

Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois, 

Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 

Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties. Telegraph Poles. Shingles. Split Shakes. Etc. 
Main Office— Crocker Bids.. San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 

ALFRED BANNISTER 

EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 

1434 Post Street San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 2871 

-BREVITY IS THE SOUL OF WIT. 
GOOD WIFE! YOU NEED 

SAPOLIO 



Brushes 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 8, 1910. 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $10,868,154.20 

Deposits 20,612.588.66 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,915.762.32 

Isaias W. Hellman, President I. W. Hellman. Jr., Vice-President 

F. L. Lipman. Vice-President Frank B. King. - - - Cashier 

George Grant. Assist. Cashier W. McGavin, - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs. Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Isaias W. Hellman Wm. F. Herrtn Leon Sloss F. W. Van Sicklen C. De Gulgne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan H. E. Law Dudley Evans J. Henry Meyer 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Chas. J. Deering Wm. Hass F. L. Lipman E. H. Harriman 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consilient with prudent banking- New accounts 

are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 

Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000. Reserve, $6,000,000 

DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES . 

Arrangements have recently been completed under which the branches 
of this Bank are able to issue Drafts on the principal points 
in the following countries: 
Austria-Hungary Finland Ireland Russia 

Belgium Formosa Italy Servia 

Brazil France Japan Slam 

Bulgaria Fr'ch Cochln-ChinaJava South Africa 

Cevlon Germany Manchuria Straits Settlements 

China Great Britain Mexico Sweden 

Crete Greece Norway Switzerland 

Denmark Holland Persia Turkey 

Egypt Iceland Philippine Islands West Indies 

Faroe Islands India Roumanla and elsewhere. 

NO DELAY IN ISSUING. FULL PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION. 
San Francisco Office — Bruce Heathcote, Manager, California and San- 
some streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1. 000,000.00 

Reserw and Contingent Funds 1.529,978.50 

Deposits. December 31. 1909 38.610.731.93 

Total Assets 41,261,682.21 

Remittance may be made by Draft. Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits on] v. 

OFFICERS— President. N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President. Daniel Meyer: 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier, Wm. Herrman; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, 
A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt. Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte, Ign. 
Stelnhardt. I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillman, Jr.. E. T. Kru^e 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH. 2572 Mission- street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement street, between 5th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 
Manager. 

Central Tru& Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue 
Accounts of Individuals, firms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world. 
Capital paid In, $1,600,000. Surplus, $100,000. 

B. G. TOGNAZZI, Manager. 

French Savings Bank 

108 SUTTER ST.. NEAR MONTGOMERY. _ 

Paid-up Capital \ $600,000 

Total Assets $4,270,800 

Strictly a savings bank. Open Saturday evenings from 7 to 8:30. 

OFFICERS— Charles Carpy. President; Arthur Legallet, First Vice- 
President: Leon Bocqueraz. Second Vice-President; A. Bousquet, Secre- 
tary; A. Bergerot, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS— N. C. Babln. J. A. Bergerot, O. Bozlo. Charles Carpy, 
Arthur Legallet, G. Beleney, H. de St. Seine, J. M. Dupas, Leon Boc- 
queraz, J. E. Artlgues, J. S. Godeau. John Glnty. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. 

The French -American Bank occupies offices In the same building. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. E. CORNER SANSOME AND PINE STREETS. 
Capital, $4,000,000 Surplus. $1,360,000 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, President: H. FLEISHHACKER.' Vice-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER, Vice-President: C. F. HUNT. Vice- 
President; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Cashier; 
P. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit, available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 

Italian -American Bank 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

Paid-up Capital $760,000 

Surplus 210,000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers in foreign exchange 
Officers — A. Sbarboro, President; A. E. Sbarboro. Cashier; H. J. 
Crocker, Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro. Assistant Cashier. 




HEART'S DESIRE. 

"God give you your heart's desire, 

Whatever it be," she said ; 
Then down the gallery's shining length 

Like a thing of light she sped. 

Her face was a stranger's face; 

Her name I shall never know; 
But softly her benediction fell 

As the night-winds breathing low. 

Who knoweth the heart's desire? 

Its innermost secret dream? 
Its holiest shrine where the altar lights 

Forever and ever gleam? 

Who guesseth the heart's desire ? 

Ah, neither you nor I ! 
It hideth away in darkling space 

From the gaze of the passer-by. 

Who giveth the heart's desire 

To the child that cries for the moon ? 

Or the samite robe and the Holy Grail 
To the soul that was born too soon? 

Who giveth the heart's desire 

To the lover whose love lies dead? 
Or the priest who faces the silence 

With the living word unsaid ? 

Who giveth the heart's desire 

To the poet with harp unstrung, 
When he droppeth the trembling lyre 

With his noblest song unsung? 

— Julia C. R. Dorr in Scribner's. 



THE CRISIS. 



This solemn hour God takes from out all Time — 
Time that built up the mountains and the main. 
And brought embattled empires down the plain, 
And raised the cities, seen in every clime; 

This solemn hour God takes from out all Time 
(Though Time with mightier issues pregnant be 
Forevermore), and gives this hour to me 
Wherein to prove my manhood at the prime. 

And I walk on even to the martial voice 

Of strong musicians that have faced the foe; 
And with me stars and troops of angels go; 

And God is watching . . . ready to rejoice. 

And I walk on . . . to where the roads of Choier 
Are broad and narrow . . . Shall I falter? . . . No! 
— William Ellen/ Leonard, in The Century. 



"THE HEART KNOWETH." 

Sometimes my little woe is lulled to rest, 

Its clamor shamed by some old poet's page — 

Tumult of hurrying hoof, and battle-rage, 

And dying knight, and trampled warrior-crest, 

Stern faces, old heroic souls unblest. 

Eye me with scorn, as they my grief would gage, 

A mere child, schooled to weep upon the stag''. 

Tricked for a part of woe and sombre-dreat. 

"l.o, who art thou." they ask, "that thou shouldsi frel 

To find, forsooth, one single heart undone? 

The page tl.ou turnest there is purple-wet 

With blood that, gushed from Caesar overthrown ! 

Lo, who art thou to prate of sorrow?" Yet, 

This little woe. it is my own, my own! 

— Charlotte Wilson in Mediae's. 




EsUbtUhcd July 20. TSS4 




Devoted to the Leading Interest! of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 15, 1910 



Ni. 3 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway. C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhill, E. C England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Gough street is to have street car service — only a "spur 

I rack," you know. 

Of a certainty, no walking delegate, ever ventures to give 

advice to a baseball umpire. 

That big credit bank project seems to have lost itself in 

some Wall street sub-cellar. 

They are having a spectre airship in Maine. We thought 

Maine was a prohibition State. 

Times are getting better all the time, but reckless specu- 
lation is after them with a club. 

Taft still stands by Ballinger, the lumber and land 

thieves to the contrary notwithstanding. 

The Independence League has gone to live with Tam- 
many's tiger, but on the inside of the tiger. 

Speaker Cannon only smiles and lights a fresh cigar 

when asked about Taft's hunt for insurgents. 

This world is not so small, after all. Dr. Cook has lost 

himself in it, and no traces of him can be found. 

For campaign purposes, the British House of Lor 

Peers is now called the house of boars — of defeat. 

And now comes a scheme {■< connect India and China by 

ailroad. Engineers say the project is entirely feasible. 

The greatesl value of (lie Copenhagen Endings is that 

fake explorers will hereafter be careful about their data. 

The holidays are over, and there is no longer "|>itv for 

the poor postman." Bui more pay is all he evi red for. 

Whal k( ii if the parcels 

of the post-office department? The ill gladly pay the 

bill. 

The latest figures shoK that in a pinch ' could 

mustier 15,000,000 "boyS in blue," all b 
family. 

Taft is charged wii ! extravagance, hut that is 

nothing In what will be laid at his door when the insurgents get 
good and mad. 

l.os Angeles, ten, is crying fur chai 

will permit of the chai the political to the busini 

of running the town. 

Yes, the organization of a municipal ownership club has 

lieen completed. Organize more clubs. There will b 
en for the enthusiastic. 

It may not be ideal political morals for the Pr« 

cut off the insurgents' supply of electioneering ammunit 
it is mighty sound political settee. 

Now Year swear-otTs and New Year reeolutioi - 

tor are already a drug on the market. The manly man just quits 
habits that lead in the wrong direction. 

The firing line of the coming Gubernatorial 

nominations is getting a little crowded in spots, hut no artillery 

D brought into action. Only a Hell has been 
thus far. 



Because New York City owes a public debt of $142.52 

per capita, it is no reason why San Francisco should incur a big 
debt by buying up old railroads. 

There is no doubt about the genius of the foodpacker who 

reduces the size of his packages and reduces the price to make the 
consumer believe he is getting bargains. 

The New Jersey authorities claim that the cost of living 

has increased in recent months 37.13 per cent. Is not New Jer- 
sey the home of nil the big trust companies? 

Kansas City has killed as dead as a doornail a scheme to 

grant a street car company a franchise to run as long as grass 
grows and water continues to seek its level. 

There is worse logic than this : Because the cost of living 

is going up, wages must go up, and because wages must go up, 
the cost of living must continue to go up. 

An Italian has invented a wireless instrument no larger 

than a watch, which one may carry in his vest pocket and com- 
municate with home or office as one walks along. 

If the Congress does not lake up the question of the in- 
creased cost of living, and do something for the people, many 
new faces will be seen in Ihe next gathering of patriot-. 

Among Taft's Christmas gifts were a dozen different por- 
traits el' himself ami family, lie wishes it to lie undersl I thai 

be does nut really look as some of the artists have represented 
him. 

Chicago is planning Eoi i civi .'--"elation of 100,000 

members. Meanwhile the same "Id gang of political bosses will 

continue to run things, bul net mi wind. They work for cash 
in hand. 

Tt was DO 36 that the knife and the vermiform 

appendix jointly discovered thai th lint is none 

other than the appendicitis, and ever since they have been in close 

partner- 

The plan Jup rvisors of a dozen or 

less first-class business men, w' ill their time to 

the eii now called '•the San Francisco idea" by 

ni towns. 

The Qovemmenl blue 1 k. jusl issued, shows that I 

Sain has 370,065 persons on his payroll. The number of sppli- 
;i"i given, but they comprise a fore- big enough 
•n. 

This sound and • ' ilifomia comes all the 

"in Boston: "The Calif or r with 

be Panama (anal Exposition; then the rest of the 
country will get together with them." 

ion of equal pay for men and women teachers 

is growing hot in should he no question at all 

about it. If women at men, they should 

permitted to teach at any price, but if they are, why dis- 
criminate against them. 

New York's striking shirt- il refusing 

D to work, and aban- 

of pinning the u r shoulders. Amen, we all say, 
and all sing the song of thi shirt. 
The Illinoie 9 > per- 
il a day of humanity 
and t know what 
children of 9 f, and need 
no more knowledge or experience on I 



EPHTOIRH AL 



INT 



When Roosevelt 
Returns. 



Will San Francisco be the first 
American city to sec Theodore Roose- 
velt on his return to his native 
land from Africa? If it is, then 
look for a demonstration three thousand miles broad, from the 
Pacific Port to Washington, for the West, never more so than 
now, is ready for Roosevelt. It-is believed in Washington that if 
Roosevelt should, "on his return from Elba." come home by way 
of San Francisco it may be taken as a proof thai lie intends to 
try again for the Presidential nomination ami election. It can 
not be gainsaid that should he land in San Francisco and start 
westward across the- continent, the impetus that his cause would 
receive would be sufficient to bounce him over any close corporate 
national convention, and land him in the White House before the 
astonished gaze of William Ff. Taft. 

It is not wild reasoning backward from the goal to the starting 
point that develops the idea that Roosevelt ma\ return. to the 
United States via San Francisco. It is a matter of common 
news that he has promised the President of the University of 
California that he would deliver a scries of addresses on the cam- 
pus al Berkeley on his return from abroad, lie also has several 
scries of addresses and lectures to deliver in England.. at Ox- 
ford, and in Berlin. It would not be strange if be decided to 
return to America by the Asiatic route. China and Japan are 
interesting countries which flic famous hunter and sociologist 
has not studied intensively at first hand. 

A tour of Asia means a landing at San Francisco. 

San Francisco is ready. The Panama-Pacific Exposition Com- 
mittee and the Portola Committee have agreed that there shall 
be no more Portola celebration until after the big Fair, so this 
city will be in the mood for a reception celebration to the mighty 
hunter of lions and stand-patters. That is the ephemeral side 
of the matter. 

There is a far deeper and truer spirit in California than the 
mood to celebrate which would welcome Colonel Roosevelt. Less 
than a year of President Taft's administration has convinced the 
West thni President Taft is not the President we expected him 
to be. Perhaps it is Roosevelt's fault that Taft is our President 
— undoubtedly Roosevelt picked him out for the place. But there 
is heard not a word of criticism on that score against the former 
President. The West feels that he was as much mistaken as we 
were. 

And it will call upon Roosevelt to rectify that mistake. It 
will not want to trust to another Rooseveltian selection, but 
would trust io Roosevelt himself. 

The Pacific liner, bearing Roosevelt, would steam through the 
Golden Gate into a demonstration such as greeted the Atlantic 
Beet. Wharves and riggings and hill tops would lie clustered 
with people. Elba is a place neither north or south or cast or 
west. It is the material fairyland from whence our real heroes 
or conquerors come. Cannes. Napoleon's port of disembarkation 
in bis return from Elba, was small and safe lor the surreptitious 
launching of a monster project. 

San Francisco would 1"' the magnificent Cannes for a Roose- 
veltian exploit. Roosevelt would immediately become (be victim 
of a movement. He would be the swimmer on the wave. ITc 
could not raise his hand and demand a cessation of the clamor 
which he would stimulate, but that the clamor would deepen ten- 
fold. He could not refuse the nomination as he landed at San 
Francisco, as the nomination would not he handed him. All that 
he could do would be to receive the ovations of a people tilling the 
streets with their cheers. 

California would start the Roosevelt boom. Nevada would 
take it up. Utah, Colorado, Wyoming, every Stale over which 
the Roosevelt train sped would flock to the railroad and cheer, 
eheer, cheer for the man who had come home. When the train 
stopped to take on water, it would really stop through no volition 
on the part of its passenger to take on votes. 

Chicago would be reached. Chicago is Rooseveltian. There 
would be i demonstration that would rival the reception in San 
Francisco. New York would be approached. The chronic cyni- 
cism of the East would be dissipated by the fact that a New 
Yorker was returning to Washington, presumably, through his 
native State. 

And the most splendid part of the entire movement would be 
that Roosevelt, on his return from Elba, selected San Francisco 
as his Cannes, and that while he would not have to flaunt his 



standards nor issue a proclamation, the people would spring to 
bis side, duly registered voters, ready to march afoot with him, 
if need be, to re-establish his policies and revive the Rooseveltian 
era at sad, sunken Washington. 



Some eighteen months ago, when 
A Funeral Oration. the Spreckels Prosecution was suf- 

fering from one of its periodical 
collapses, prophetic of its final dissolution, Dr. Taylor appointed 
a special committee to diagnose its symptoms and investigate its 
life history. This, doubtless, was done at the urgent demand of 
the patient himself, with the desperate hope of discovering a 
sorely needed heart tonic. The very existence of the committee 
long ago had passed into oblivion, when on the eve of Dr. Tay- 
lor's retirement it arose with a voluminous report presenting an 
elaborate eulogy of the deceased patient. Why was the tonic 
withheld until so long after the patient's decease? Did the doc- 
tors refrain from administering their nostrums during the 
patient's dying days because they were all too conscious not only 
that his condition was beyond the reach of remedy, but thai 
their prescription was impotent. At this late date the investi- 
gators' report could only savor of a post mortem. But if such 
a process is to lie of any value, the facts must he faced and the 
truth told. In this case the investigators have drawn a veil 
over the patient's fatal trouble, and have been content to hand 
to Dr. Taylor a fulsome and valueless funeral oration, ignoring 
the disease that caused destruction and eulogizing the deceased 
for pretended virtues. 



The Cardinal Vice. The report of Dr. Taylor's investi- 

gating committee only merits seri- 
ous consideration in one particular. It attempts the lamest of 
apologies for the cardinal vice of the Spreckels prosecution — 
the control of public office by a private citizen — which ulti- 
mately caused its complete discredit and undoing. The alleged 
motive of the Spreckels prosecution was to pursue and punish the 
crime of bribery — the payment of money by private citizens to 
public officials. The first act of Rudolph Spreckels in assuming 
command of the graft prosecution was to secure the appointment 
of Francis J. Heney as assistant District Attorney and Public 
Prosecutor. According to Rudolph Spreckels's sworn admission, 
from the day that Heney entered the District Attorney's office 
and throughout his official career, this public official was in re- 
ceipt of large sums of money — amounting to $100 a month — 
from this private citizen's purse. This is the damning blot on 
the record of the Spreckels Prosecution, which defiled it as a 
private conspiracy and stamped the pretended crusade to correct 
crime as criminal. 



How docs Dr. Taylor's investigating 
Better Buried. committee attempt to condone this 

crime in its post mortem analysis? 
It evades the charge, which it admits caused "great outcry," 
and with the thinnest of subterfuges urges that certain corpora- 
tions "have, al \ annus times during the period of the graft 
prosecutions, furnished lawyers to the office of the District At- 
torney to aid in the prosecution of minor offenses.'' Such a 
suggestion most abjectly demonstrates the infirmity of the apol- 
ogy. There can be no possible parallel hit ween the open em- 
ployment by private citizens of special counsel to aid the Dis- 
trict Attorney's office and the secret payment of the public prose- 
cutor by a private citizen. The damning fact studiously ignored 
and evaded by the Taylor whitewashing committee is that 

. i 

'Rudolph Spreckels secured the appointment of 
Francis J. Heney as Assistant District Attorney and 
Public Prosecutor, and throughout his term of office, 
while securing indictments from the Grand Jury and 
conducting pub/if prose, utions, Francis J. Heney was 
the private and secretly paid employee of Rudolph 
Spreckels." 

No amount of white-wash could ever cover that blot. But it 
would have been better for the reputations of the gentlemen who 
signed the Taylor investigating committee's report if they had 
buried it with the disgraced corpse of the Spreckels Prosecution. 



January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



3 



The Steel Trust 
Will FlGHT. 



The indications are thai the New 
Year, in addition to opening wide 
the gates of prosperity, will tear 
down the fences so that capital and 
labor may have a wide field in which to battle for alleged prin- 
ciples. The national Federation of Labor has already challenged 
the so-called steel trust to combat, or rather the steel trust is al- 
ready in the field with banners flying. That it will be the most 
determined and relentless struggle between organized capital and 
organized labor the country has had to witness for many a day. 
there is little room for doubt, and there are small hopes of an 
adjustment of differences. The question is not now which side 
is most to blame. The steel company insists upon its right to 
maintain the "open shop," and contract with each skilled or com- 
mon laborer as an individual for his services upon a mutually 
agreed wage basis. The Federation or labor unions in the iron 
and steel industry insist that hours of service and wage schedules 
shall be questions for discussion and settlement between steel 
and iron workers in their collective or organized capacity and the 
steel company. The steej company refuses to retreat from its 
open shop principle of employing workmen, and organized labor 
refuses its services upon such conditions. The gulf which sepa- 
rated Dives from Lazarus is no wider nor deeper nor more bridge- 
less, apparently, than the chasm which divides these contending 
forces in the wide and productive field of labor and labor employ- 
ment. 

The steel company claims that after long experience it finds 
that the open shop principle of employment is vastly superior to 
labor union's method of settling the questions of hours of service 
and wage schedules by joint commission between the parties in 
interest. Certainly the steel company is partial to the open shop 
because and only because it gets more 'satisfactory results than 
it ever has by the union shop and agreements by a joint commis- 
sion. The Federation of Labor insists that labor as a com- 
munity of organized forces has rights, when it comes to defining 
the relations between labor and capital which shall be expressed 
in convention of the whole rather than by individuals. Not with- 
out reason the iron and steel workers claim that inasmuch as the 
steel company is an organized force of capital, they as an organ- 
ized force have the moral and legal right to the same kind of 
recognition, and to make contracts for hours and wages that the 
company claims for itself in procuring raw materials and selling 
its products. 

In order to make the battle strong and the final victory 
worth fighting for, the steel company is in the best possible 
stale ol preparedness for a long struggle. On the other hand, 
the Federal ion is increasing its "war fund"' by thousands and tens 
of thousands of dollars. But whatever the cost may be to the 
Sleel Company, it will be a total loss, as much so as 
devoured by lames, and so with the iron ami ateel workers, their 

loss will lie total and everlasting, for it will be enforced idle- 
ness with no income whatever. Certainly peace will come Bome 
lime, and sometime the company will resume operations, bul 
never in Ibis world will either side recover one penny of (he losses 
incurred by the war. In view of ihis, the wonder is thai sensible 
ineu would not vesori lo arbitral ion and stop their idiotic per- 
formances. 



A Tunnel Under 

'Twin PEAKS. 



Mayor P. H. McCarthy has one plan 
for public improvement during his 
administration which transcends in 
originality and constructive work all 
other projects outlined in hi- message. That is the plan to 
'Twin Peaks with a tunnel, which will extend Market street into 
Hie I'arkside and Tngloside districts. 

The idea for the work is not new with McCarthy. It has 
considered theoretically by Supervisors, and the Merchants' 
Association has gone so far as to have rough estimates of the 
cost of the work— which would be about $1,500,000 — made for 
further consideration. But it has always been considered as a 
subjeel for meditation, a consummation when all street car lines 
publicly owned, and every fresh Hetch Hetchv streamlet 
lur doors. There was. until McCarthy's addr - 
riven that the work would be undertaken within the 
period of this generation. 

If Mayor McCarthy can accomplish that improvement in a 
satisfactory manner, financially, he will leave behind him a com- 
mendable monument — if a tunnel may. by any stretch of the 
langua signaled. 

McCarthy's foremost pledge is his promise to build a City Hall. 



But there is nothing novel nor daring in that enterprise. That 
a City Hall will be built in San Francisco is inevitable. That it 
would be started during the next two years under any administra- 
tion was almost a certainty. The details of the convenience, 
commodiousness and architectural beauty of the building are 
matters which would depend on the temperament of the builders. 
A City Hall planned and constructed under the present regime 
should he a serviceable building, honestly made, if the Union 
Labor Supervisors would devote their mechanical knowledge to 
the cause of the city. A loss mechanical administration might 
plan a nobler building, hut the incumbents should give the city 
how the votes were counted last November. 

The Twin Peaks tunnel was not assured. It is a daring idea 
of McCarthy's to launch that project, .even in the tentative form 
of an inaugural suggestion, at this time, when the city is busy 
with its balances. But McCarthy did declare for it, and since 
obstinacy is a McCarthy virtue he should carry it through. 

A tunneled extension of Market street would mean that San 
Francisco can compete with Alameda and San Mateo Counties as 
a "suburb." With the hills standing boldly at the end of the 
city's great thoroughfare, Market street is a tremendous cul de 
sac. A tunnel would let in the light and let the people out into 
fresh air, while the Peaks would shut out urban noise, travail and 
the sound of raucous nickelodeons. 

It will take shrewd maneuvering to commit the city to this 
work. Not that it is not a needed improvement, but on account 
of the proverbial "neighborhood spirit" of the sections of the 
city, which leads the voter to look with suspicion on any public 
work which does not benefit his immediate district. That feeling. 
and the peculiar sectional advantage of the Market street exten- 
sion to the district affected, would make it difficult for a bond 
issue to be voted for as a whole to provide funds for the boring. 

However, there are other ways of raising money for public 
work than by general bond issues. Street and sewer work has 
been provided for regularly by the establishment of assessment 
districts in the neighborhoods to be improved. Under that plan 
a large assessment district might he established, embracing the 
Parkside district, the Inglcside district and all the territory 
lving between and in the vicinity of the Lake Merced Ranche. 
A charter amendment may have to be passed before such a dis- 
trict could lie established. 

A private corporation would doubtleSE pierce the hill were it 
permitted to establish a toll gate in the passage. But this is a 

job for tin- ritv to undertake. 

Should the I'anama-I'acitie exposition lie held on the Like 
Merced property, as is nml "ti by members of the ex- 

ecutive committee, a tunnel through Twin Peaks would pay for 
itself in one year. 

Mayor McCarthy, in advocating the tunnel, demonstrates 
lie can look ahead. Now let him build it and let us B 
ahead, into the future home site of San Francisco's citizenship. 



The man who puts a second and in- 
Telephone Troubles. dependent telephone in his office is 

a man who is seeking trouble for 
himself. Two telephones, if your present - good, means 

only a duplication of calls and annoyance, while a duplication 
of 'phones, if the service is bad. i- absolutely an unendurable 
nuisance. In Los Angeles an,] Oakland, the existence of a dual 
number of 'phones means -imply annoyance, and many oi 
who have had the newer system put in are wishing that 
out again. There is nothing to be gained in San Francis 
another system, as the Supervisors ' ; \ the rate and competition is 
eliminated. The service is a splendid one. and there are no 
complaints. 



It is a well-known fact that F 
Good Roads and Tubes, enco very way the plant- 

ing of trees along roads and 
\ ards on the principle that the I 

roadbed. San Leandro. California, is to take up this question as 
a result of a mass meeting held this week, with a view to planting 

_ ts main a\cnu. - if fifty feel 

property-owners will pay for the trees at the rate of f 

Tre, planting should be in force all over t 8 on all 

ounty roads. Nothin_ try or 

to the enjoyment of ridin_ nitiful 

trees. It is not difficult to induce a tree to grow in California, 
and no county is so poor but it can afford trees along its public 
highways, 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 



There is a great deal of interest 
Inverse Rooseveltism. shown in the struggle of the insur- 
gent element in Congress to investi- 
gate the source of the continual increase in the cost of living. 
On the other hand, the Aldrich-Cannon stand-patters are trying 
in every way to evade any kind of an investigation that will really 
investigate." In fact, it is said that one ill-advised Congressman 
who took the brave stand that a real investigation was needed in 
view of a threat of a further rise in the costs of the bare necessi- 
ties of life was met with the knock-down argument that he would 
be cut off from all share of patronage in- the pic counter of per- 
quisites. The cost of living is held high a? Hainan by the com- 
bination of large and small interests who purvey to our stomachs 
and our every-day physical need, our coal and our wearing ap- 
parel. 

The curse of this country is combination, and a real investiga- 
tion would really put a stop to the conspiracy to make living ex- 
penses higher and yet higher, but that is not at all the program 
of the Cannon-Aldrieh group of able politicians who represent the 
special privilege interests in our national legislative halls. 

The Taft people have (lie hard job of convincing the public 
that they are carrying out the Koosevelt policies under cover of a 
magnificent special privilege and protection campaign. 

In his inaugural address, Mayor 

McCarthy's Inaugural. McCarthy took the public into bis 
confidence to the extent of admitting 
that right at the outset he found his administration handicapped 
by the acts and record of the preceding administration, and 
which lie wished the public to understand the effects of are not 
chargeable to him. no: should they be. even if it takes a little 
while to right the great wrongs committed by his predecessors. 
The charges which he filed before the court of public sentiment 
against the outgoing officials, if well-founded, are likely to make 
the public wonder how so much official iniquity could lie tolerated 
under an administration that posed as the embodiment of all the 
civic virtues known to high moral character and political clean- 
liness. The farewells of the retiring officials sounded like short 
speeches from self-satisfied members of a mutual admiration 
society. But before they had quite finished the tickling, the 
new Mayor held up a mirror in which they could see themselves 
as they were and hod been. But if the mirror reflected only the 
truth, all the more the reason why Mayor McCarthy should in- 
augurate a system of civic Government that is and shall be above 
suspicion of favoritism, dishonesty or pious cant. That he may 
continue his story of official corruption, wicked favoritism and 
political and social prostitution, and all, the good people of the 
city and State and nation will join in the chorus of his song: 
"T>et the heathen rage and the galled jades wince." 



Although nearly every one you meet 
The Greatness of It. will promptly concede that tin- pub- 
lic concerns of San Francisco should 
be conducted upon sound and approved business principles, it is 
astonishing how very few have given the matter sufficient thought 
to give a logical renson why political supervision should be elimi- 
nated and business methods installed. Tt is uol so much the 
fear of official corruption that discredits a political municipal 
administration as the uncertain and contradictory methods which 
always attend an administration whose personnel more resembles 
Joseph's coat, than a harmoniously colored symmetrica] cut and 
fitted garment. 

How many of those who own property and pay taxes in San 
Francisco ever stop to think and realize that as such they are 
general partners in a business enterprise of more far-reaching 
ramifications than any other one or a dozen of the most extensive 
enterprises in the city? The interest of these general partners 
in the capital and transactions of official San Francisco aggre- 
gates about $540,000,000, upon which they will owe when they 
hair Installed an efficient water system and reconstructed the 
Deary street railroad not far from $SO.OOO,000. This does not 
include the probable cost of new municipal buildings which 
must soon be erected to take the place of the sheds now used to 
house the official city. But the municipality is unlike an ordi- 
nary business enterprise. Tt is not its purpose to make, but to 
spend, money, and it can have but two accounts, viz., income and 
expenditure, and at the end of the business year the two accounts 
should balance. 

The city cannot go in debt for borrowed money, nor otherwise 
become a debtor without pledging the taxable property of the 



general partners as security for the obligation. Speaking in the 
parlance of the ''street." the capital stork, as good as paid, of 
San Francisco as a business enterprise, is "in round figures," 
$540,000,000. Against this now. or will soon, stand obligations 
aggregating not a great deal below $100,000,000. But while this 
debt, or debts, is a lien upon the taxable property of the general 
partners of (he enterprise, its expenditure is in betterments, the 

profits accruing from which are to be seen in advanced values, 
market values and incomes of the property taxed, thus not ob- 
liging a single genera] partner to ini nr the expense of a penny 
because he gets bis returns foi this (ax investment in increased 
values of his holdings. That is what may very properly be railed 
a municipal Government on a strictly business basis without so 
much as standing room for either speculation or politics. It is 
an enterprise the conduct of which provides Eor neither profit nor 
loss, but that the entire income shall be devoted to current ex- 
penses, such as for betterments and provisions for interest on 
borrowed money, nor will room be found anywhere in conduct- 
ing snrb a municipal enterprise for any more favoritism on per- 
sonal grounds, or for political advantage than one would expect 
to find in a great banking institution. 

If, then, the municipality of San Francisco is to be conducted 
as business enterprise on the most approved business principles, 
into what sort of band should the responsibility and trust be 
committed? Surely a business capita! aggregating $540,000,000, 
with almost plenary power oveT ; t and ramifications in the field 
of expenditure reaching all the ivaj from a lead pencil to an 

immense water Supply plant -houbl not h>- committed to the 

keeping and supervision of men other than such as arc capable to 

manage by natural business gifts, actual experience in fields of 

large and complicated enterprises, and in whom the community is 

assured by long business contact there reposes high and sterling 
business integrity. As the late President McKinley would say: 
"Cheap clothes make cheap men." Because a man is a master 
blacksmith, it does not follow that he should be commissioned to 
construct, a chronometer. 



A good many people who so cnthusi- 
S aa Second Thought, astically voted for the Geary street 

bond issue that they were sorry they 
bad not more i - to throw in for the proposition, are now be- 
ginning to realize that it was not to fasten Government ownership 
on the city that filled their souls with joy. but a desire to do 
something that would oblige the Hnited Railroads to give better 
service, more am 1 cleaner cars. Now they are wondering how 

the bond issue, a municipally-owned road without water front 
connection ami transfer privileges with existing lines, and a ride 
on Point I. obos avenue to the ocean, is going to coerce the United 
Railroads into doing the square thing by the city. Tt is often 
the case that a second thought is a good thing to take, and that 
a hindsight view of things is often educational. However, all is 
well that ends well, even if one does bite off more than one can 
comfortably chew at the moment. 



X 




CHAS.I 

ExctstrsrvE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 



% 



No Branch Stores. No Agents. 
OUR FASHIONS AND FABRICS ARE SELECTED WITH CARE. AP- 
PEALING TO MEN OF TASTE AND FASHIONABLE DRESSERS. 
GOOD. READY-MADE CLOTHES ARE POPULAR WITH MEN WHO 
KNOW. OUR CLOTHES EXPERIENCE SHOULD BE WORTH SOME- 
THING. WE TURN OUT CLOTHES HERE THAT FOOL MOST OF 
THE TAILORS. 



Our new Swatches, 
Fabrics ana p.-itlrrns (Ufo 
arc Here. X»*J 



aa^ilus <& (Jo. »" 



Make your 
on Now; We'll 

it for You. 



You can rip open any of our garments and you'll wee work that 
no other shop, ^xeopt <.f high-class order, could afford to put 
in. All our body lininss and canvas are hand work. Posi- 
tively no machine in the inside of our co I py seam 
throughout the coal ha an outlet. Now, tl I Is called 
hand-tailored clothes, and only exclusive nien shops can afford 
to keep. "We know everybody can't afford the bi at, but we've 
suits and overcoats at twenty-two with the above described 
tailoring. 



Jewelers Building, Poft Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



.Tamahy 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 





7&*rm Gxr/ Me Or- Au/ai3a>/ 
'QK<hdmBfly$Kr)tB?,s,r, 



My impulse to fly to (he defense of men whose welfare is 

the justification of organized society and to administer a sting- 
ing repioof to the perverted discernment of the Mayor-elect has, 
upon brief reflection, become somewhat modified, if not entirely 
dissolved. This revulsion of feeling somewhat tardily overtook 
me at the hour when the stub-tailed and halt Pegasus which, for 
two years, has supported our Mayor that was, pranced up to 
meet the wheelbarrow which tfundled in our Mayor that is upon 
that memorable occasion of exchanging discourtesies, last week, 
at the temporary City Hall. Upon that epoch-making occasion, 
I am constrained to admit, the gentleman who formerly per- 
formed odd carpenterial stunts for the management of the old 
California Hotel came off first best, and in the manner of his 
taking on, quite eclipsed in boorishness and ill-nature the man- 
ner of the poet's taking off. Never, since thoughtfully providing 
for the futures of Messrs. Spreckels and Phelan by publicly con- 
signing both those gentlemen to hell, has our foremost citizen 
appeared more sure of himself and his opportunities; and his 
frankness in admitting the mistakes and uncovering the sins of 
his predecessors in office is evidence that the two distinguished 
gentlemen will not be lonesome in their' new place of residence 
providing they can content themselves with the society of a large 
and varied assortment of ex-municipal officials of the appointive 
variety. 

The two women arrested this week for shop-lifting de- 
serve little consideration, and should be severely punished. They 
are evidently of a low order of intelligence, as neither of them 
sought to exonerate herself by the plea of being either a she-poet 
or a magazine writer in search of material for her "literary 
work." Indeed, it was plain that they were vulgarly engaged in 
collecting material for their personal adornment. Possessed of 
neither temperament nor poetry, they cannot be excused for in- 
jecting themselves into a field of endeavor hitherto embellished 
almost exclusively by their more gifted sisters. If such amateurs 
are encouraged, how is the young lady of prepossessing appear- 
ance and other vices who has so unsuccessful!} essayed a criminal 
career as to attract the warranted interference of the police 
courts to disguise her rascality by the pretense that she is one 
of the literate? When next a member of the Young Ladies' 
Press ('bib seeks to acquire, for the enlightenment of the ignor- 
ant and innocentj the actual sensations -i a thief, it is already 

possible she may be informed that she has occasioned herself a 

great deal of unnecessary inconvenience and trouble, is ah was. 
indubitably, a thief before giving a practi a] public demonstra- 
tion of the fact. 

Professor William Henrj Lightlj thinks thai the e 

will come when the State shall require all prospective home 
builders, before entei thorough 

course in eugenii and child reari i 'is- 

respecl i" the professor and those other '-day 

working along the same line ol aan's 

. olumri ol Sunday editions. I w >ul 

I., early marriages arc already sufficiently nui 
iug fo thai particular class of m 

i is the population of the world. The I 
grow ing : a \ 

Buffii cumulation and rearing of a family, - 

with her nation no: '.bite and 

iblem in so en- 

eration of philosophers and invei 
An of a baby will, ere long, be welcomed to our world 

unless, perchance, miraculously, the lost art be rediscovered of 

the world as was max mother Eve. And 
plying spare ribs for the bene erity is nol 

career our more ambitious modern male most fier -. but 

unli it himself, at the rat,' the weakei 

herself aloft. e\en this - 
good for him. 



Mr. John Temple Graves is of the opinion that the fired 

forester of the Boosevelt regime is manifesting distinct symptoms 
of being a man of destiny, and asserts that since his advent into 
public life he has always occupied a place in the public considera- 
tion superior to bis official State, and are in advance of the re- 
pute enjoyed by men of larger public stations." This is not in- 
frequently the position of the man who talks too much. His 
creed is, that the life and opinions of no other one person is 
necessary to this world, but that it is of capital importance to the 
stability of the social system that we all learn to mind each 
other's business, which, in a measure, accounts for the difficulties 
and embarrassments strewn in the pathway of the man of des- 
tiny who bucks against the stream instead of gliding along with 
the current. Just at present this particular man of destiny has 
bucked himself out of a job, and it is extremely improbable that 
he will long hold the center of the stage, despite his wealth and 
newspaper notoriety, without substantial aid from that other 
man of destiny who is just now busy hunting strange animals 
and bugs in the wilds of darkest Africa. 

The other day I talked to a man sentenced to be hanged. 

Although he had killed his man in a drunken row and considered 
himself justified, he could not sleep because he said his conscience 
troubled him and he had visions of the dead man appearing dur- 
ing the night hours, in his cell. He will be banged soon, and 
thus, perhaps, relieved at once, to the music of a "dull sickening 
thud," of both phantom and conscience. A short time before 
1 had attended a banquet, and among the honored guests was one 
who had killed, by his own hand, many men. Why? That is a 
long story. Suffice it to say, they had been governed by men 
who had sold out to other men who had ideas regarding good Gov- 
ernment at variance with those preferred by the dead men. The 
honored guest represented the purchasers. Did his conscience 
trouble him? Did he see ghosts? Was he to give his life for 
those he had taken? Silly questions all. No more mildly man- 
nered, kindly disposed or charitably intentioned than he in all 
this big city, my brethren, according to our way of thinking, 
and none more loved and respected. You see — but thafs another 
long story, and these are paragraphs. 

-Just as the queue of the San Francisco Chinaman. 



through the success of Chief of Police Cook, in eradicating the 
horrible crime of fan-tan, had taken on lustre and dignity, and 
was beginning again to be regarded by its wearer as a means of 
being conveniently yanked into the celestial heaven instead of a 
thing to be worn as a mere ornament 

antiquity, the newly-elected Mayor declares that a Chinaman 
has just as much right to play fan-tan foi I his private 

club, as has a white man to play poker in the Press Club 

Pacific Union. At (h named that 

the lamb and the lion, the laborer and the capita litician 

and the grafter, ahal] i be the 

first to nial.i . but Mr. McCarthy Bhould be warned thai 

there are traditions of the Police I 1 i to be 

monkeyed with, and one of these is, thai a Chinaman shall not 
be permitted to entertain himself at any sport where the chances 
of a fatality has not, at least, an even show. 



"White Horse" 

Scotch Whiskey 



MACKIE 4 CO., 

Islay, Scotland 

Never in Bulk 

Charles Meinecke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 




We are to have a municipal band. 

Mayor McCarthy has promised us that if we are good, and 
since, with such a glittering treat in store for us, we cannot bul 
lie happy, kind, thoughtful, studious, virtuous, honest and what- 
ever else the moralists would have us be. 

The municipal band should strike a note of harmony, even in 
the seven-come-eleven Board of Supervisors. With the musi- 
cians grouped, with puffing cheeks, around the dais of Mayor P. 
II. McCarthy, Supervisors Murdock and Herget, Paul Bancroft 
and Kelly, Hayden and Deasy, etc., would join hands together 
and sing "London Bridge is Palling Down," or, more appropri- 
ately, "I've Kings on My Fingers." 

Why there has not been a municipal band in San Francisco 
before we cannot quite understand. We have had musical auto- 
mobile sirens in the streets, poets in the Mayor's chair and auto- 
matic pianos suppressed by the police, as positive proof of our 
musical proclivities and our discernment and taste in harmonics. 
But never has there been a city band, ready at all times to re- 
spond to the call of duty. 

A municipal band, we take it, is not like a municipal fire de- 
partment, living in a tall house with three gray horses, ready to 
slide down the greased pole on the slightest provocation from 
sweet bells out of tune, and to dash through the streets at mid- 
night, to the great joy of those who do not need it. A municipal 
band will have more selective duties. It will play in parks and 
at grand municipal receptions, when dignitaries come to the city 
to call on the Mayor, or when the first spadeful of earth of the 
Panama-Pacific exposition is turned. 

The municipal band will, we hope, have no minority which is 
suspicious of the majority, and which will play the "Ride of the 
Valkiries" when the leader directs that "Hail Columbia," be 
given. A minority voice in a city Government is the safest check 
that can be placed upon the municipal business, but a minority 
voice in the cornet squad would be too soulful for our tempers. 

* * * 

Deputy Sheriff Mattos of Oakland is an ambitious young 
officer. Moreover, he has some ideas as to prey and their proper 
haunts, and is a reader of faces — which in turn goes to prove 
that no professor under any circumstances can afford to shave his 
whiskers. On the other hand, as it seems to be the only differ- 
ence between them and the learned faculty of a university, all 
yeggmen should proceed at once to cultivate beards and eye- 
glasses. Without improving their appearance, they might look 
better with them. Deciding that he had looked like a professor 
long enough, and yearning for admiration, George C. Edwards, 
the crack mathematician of California University, shaved the 
three and a half hairs on his chin that had done duty nobly as 
a university Van Dyke, and rubbed the spot white with powder. 
Then he boarded the same train as deputy sheriff Mattos, who, 
as a reader of faces, had him arrested for the yeggman who bad 
blown up the Alvarado safe. There could be no doubt about it — 
for Edwards ran for a street car when he got off his train, a most 
unusual circumstance. A moment later he was in the hands "I' 
the deputy sheriff and half a dozen of his men. Then Sheriff 
Barnet came up, and in the dark hit him a heavy poke in the 
smallest rib. 

"Be still, villain," he said. "We've got you." 

Whereupon he hit him another poke and looked in his face. 

"Fools !" he exclaimed, suddenly aghast, turning angrily to 
his underlings. "This is Professor G. C. Edwards." 

"It was because he said he was," explained Sherlock Holmes 
Mattos, "that I wouldn't believe him." 

* * * 

When the two hundred sturdy sons of the Olympic Club drew 
up in athletic rags before the photographer of the Southern 
Pacific on their annual hike to the sea recently, there was such 
sudden kangarooing of hips and brave bellowing of chests that 



the photographer had to group them more closely to get them 
inside his lens. Their wilted condition in the un-Californian, 
almost zero weather had been such, and the difference of such 
magnitude, in fact, that he had even to utter a warning. 

"Gentlemen," he said, "you needn't expand any more — so 
long as you keep your knees from shivering." 

Then Director E. G. McConnell, who, it might be said, was 
quite puffed up, suddenly exploded. 

"Oh, to the devil with our knees," he exclaimed, letting his 
own rap together; "why don't you photograph our courage?" 

"But it wouldn't be in the interests of the State to have it 
knock-kneed," smiled the photographer. 

* * * 

Within a very few weeks. Captain Lucien Young, one of the 
most popular as well as one of the most brilliant officers of the 
Navy, will be promoted to the grade of Rear-Admiral. Captain 
Young is widely known in San Francisco, from his long tours of 
duty on this coast, particularly while Captain of the Yard at 
Mare Island. No officer in the service has received as many offi- 
cial recognitions for exceptional gallantry. He has been twice 
specially advanced in grade for extraordinary heroism, and pos- 
sesses medals, swords and graven testimonials to his bravery. It 
would be a fitting act for the Navy Department to place him in 
command of a crack squadron as soon as he dons the Admiral's 

stars. 

* * * 

The congestion that exists in the local transbay ferry system 
as a result of this city's rapid growth is becoming more pro- 
nounced every day. Perry boats have to stop, upon reaching this 
side of the bay, to permit the out-going ferry boats to leave the 
slips. The current of commuters, particularly during the rush 
hours, is strong and growing. As the News Letter has already 
pointed out, there must at an early date be a re-distribution of 
the ferry terminals. The tax upon the ferries is equaled only by 
that upon the surface transportation facilities. It is a tribute 
to the executive ability of the officials of the United liailroads 
that the demands made upon the street Ears at the foot of Market 
street are as well met as they are. 



The "last supper" given by ex-Mayor Taylor to the Board of 
Supervisors at the Bohemian Club was quite a gay and melan- 
choly affair. One of the retiring Supervisors responding to a 
rather elaborate toast, did so with Kipling's famous "Here's 
how !" 

Wliereupon the ex-Mayor caught him up deftly, and with an 
illuminating smile: "Wouldn't it be more appropriate." he sug- 
gested, "to change that to 'Here goes ;' " 

"But the new regime would add 'Nothing,' " put in another of 
the Supervisors. And they drank their wine in silence. 




The 



late 



Piano 



The choice of the Worlds' 
Greatest Prima Donna. 

Madame Marcella Sem- 
brich, both in concert and 
private life. 



The 



lalbuiin 



Piano 



Recipient of the Worlds' Highest Honors at all International 
Expositions. Should be your choice. 

MANUFACTURERS 
Pacific Coast Headquarters: 310 Sutter St. near Grant Ave.. S. F. 



.Taxuary 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



The women of Britain propose making 
a hit in the coming parliamentary cam- 
paign by wearing short skirts and nice 

on the platform wherever there is 

speaking. The suffragettes who have up 
till now utilized their shoes solely for 
kicking will doubtless learn something 
from this different use of their pedal ex- 
tremities. The trouble is, that along with 
8 short skirt the hustings are apt to re- 
veal more than shoes. In the interests of 
religion, and from the spectator's point of 
view, let us hope that whatever happens it 
will be fair to look upon. After all, poli- 
tics is taking a hunch to itself. From 
pretending to show a whole hand it is be- 
ginning to display a pretty ankle. Under 
the circumstances, things cannot help but 
look up. So no more speak of "the help- 
ing hand," but of ''the helping foot." And 
it. is a San Francisco woman in London 
who. they say, is responsible for the in- 
novation. Well, it is to be hoped that 

she was not in the wrong in her estimation _ 

of her British cousin, and that from the 

scissored skirts of England will come forth model underpin- 
nings for a nation; not simply pegs to nail the coffin-lid on the 
masculine Saxon's optimism and faith. 

* * * 

The Panama-Pacific exposition is all right, of course, but 
think of the hopes it shattered, the beauty it lopped. Seven 
years now before another Portola — seven queens gone to the 
block at a single mash of the baton. What are we going to do 
about it? And how old Don Gaspar will have grown by that 
time! Year by year we had hoped to see him age, little by little 
growing whiter and weaker, and bowing low to us from his 
chivalrous soul; year by year we had hoped to see him with a 
new queen, a maid of San Francisco, lovelier and more divine 
than the last, and the maids of San Francisco had looked for- 
ward to it, too. But now in common phrase, "It's all nil." The 
maid that would have been queen this year will be an old maid 
seven years from now. Perhaps even she will have crowsfeet 
about her eyes; or married — tiny lips will have kissed the bloom 
from her cheeks. And her successor — what fate may not have 
happened to her successor? Ah, me! how the years fly, and how 



YOU Intelligent— Up-To-Date Wo- 
* men, who have used PEARLINE 
long enough to know it — some of you for 
thirty years — couldn't do a greater favor 
to poor Soap-Rutty Women than to tell 
them of your experience with PEAR- 
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INSTEAD OF YOL 



terrible to measure them in beauty and youth 



The new Democratic daily, the San Francisco Sun. has se- 
cured a home in the six hundred block on Mission street, close to 
the newspaper center of the city. Us name blazons the front and 
back of the building, and the paper, I am told, will make its firs! 
appearance the latter part of this month. If. V. Dunn, the man- 
aging editor, lias been on a trip East, and is now on his waj back 

to star! things. It is to be observed that, since the advent of this. 
the only Democratic daily in San Francisco, the Examiner, a 
Hearst paper, is beginning to devote a little more attention to 
I temocrai tc doings. 



The trade of a firm follows the reputation. Charles 

Lyons, the London Tailor, is in his new location at 719 Market 
street. The patronage of the old firm is glad to see it located in 
its old stand, The premises are much improved, the building 
new. the exhibit rooms well calculated to the purpose, and the 
shop the best-aired, lighted and operated in the whole city. This 
tailoring establishment is well worthy a visit whether ben' on 
purchase or not. 



The wicked stand in slippery places; how is your under- 
standing p 



E. B. COURVOISIER. 

Art Dealer, Frame Maker. New store, 431 Sutter street, be- 
tween Stockton and Powell. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



TFrH ATT TAVERN CO. 

X J—J V_*X 111 V COR. EDDY and POWELL STREETS 



Special 



Phone Douglas 4700 

Restaurant, Cafe, Ladies' Grill 

Lunch served during shopping hours. 

hours, 



Concerts daily during Lunch, Shopping 
Dinner, and After Theatre. 

The orchestra ia under the leadership of the gifted and talented 
young Violin Virtuoso. Abe Wise. 

Under the management of MR. A. C. MORRISSON 




New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

Hotel 



N. W. Corner 

Polk & Post StS. 

San Francisco 

Phone 

Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 

Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 



Jules' Restaurant 



328 Bush Street 

Below Kearny Street 
PHONE KEARNY 1812 



Music every evening by Fred Epstein Orchestra 



DINNERS. With Wine 75c 



Dinners, Sundays and Holidays 
With Wine. St. 00 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 




MEE'SliD 




«"2* ttcyjv u*c3 iafJ'jaouxV-Z.X-J. 



By Paul Gerson. 

The Columbia — William H. Cram in "Father and II"' Boys." 

An event clothed with almost historical interest unci signifi- 
cance was the opening of the new Columbia Theatre lasl Mon- 
day evening. Tt marked the practical re-establishment of our 
permanent amusement centre, an immense Btep forward in the 
rehabilitation of our beloved city, and above all, the erection 
of a beautiful building to be devoted to the highesl forms of the 
drama and music. The opening of this new Temple of Thespis 
was a specially significant one. A representative audience of 
the culture and brains of San Fram isco contributing to the im- 
portance of the occasion. More than passing interest should be 
attached to the opening of this beautiful playhouse. It means 
much for the artistic future of our city. At this time we desire 
to give due thanks and the proper meed of praise to one person 
who has worked heart and soul to living about the consummation 
of the new Columbia Theatre, who has worked zealously and un- 





William Crane, as he appears in the George Ade comedy 
"Father and the Boys," at the Columbia Theatre. 



The Eight Geisha Girls, who will begin an engagement this 

Sunday afternoon at the Orpheum. 

selfishly in a splendid cause against depressing odds, ami who has 
manfully shouldered the burden of responsibility, and has borne 
criticism and praise with equal fortitude and cheerfulness, and 
who has always been a firm believer in the future of San Fran- 
■ isco and a great booster of its unlimited possibilities — we refer 
to Melville \Y. Marx. Modest and unassuming to a degree, he 
has worked against; tremendous odds, and last evening was the 
realization of his fondest dream, the result of his faithful and 
unremitting labor. It was indeed in the nature of a triumph for 
him when he appeared before the curtain to voice his personal 
lhanks for the hearty support given his partners and himself 
which lias resulted so happily. Marx is no speech-maker, and 
he tactfully introduced our new Mayor, who in a few well-chosen 
words impressed the representative audience with the due im- 
port of the occasion, and how much it helped to contribute to the 
material advancement and progress of our new city. 

The theatre is indeed a beautiful structure. It embodies the 
very latest ideas in theatrical construction in every respect. This 
country and Europe have been ransacked in the effort to improve 
on the very best, and we have no hesitation in saying that every 
San Franciscan should feel a personal pride in the erection of 
(bis beautiful building. The interior decorations are a perfect 
symphony in gold and green and blue. The lines of architecture 
are simple and dignified. There is no effort at the garish and 
tawdry, nor has the decorative idea been carried too far. No 
intercepting columns mar the view of the spectator from any part 
of the house, ibe cantilever system being used throughout. Sim- 
plicity and a .quiet, restful beauty seemed to be the aim of the 
builders. The seating capacity, while not very large, is ample, 
anil the acoustics are unusually good, and the line of vision is 
perfect from any part of the house. The stage is large enough 
to meet any possible requirement, and the accommodations for 
the actors is all that could be desired. The theatre is contiguous 
to the fashionable shopping and hotel district, an ideal environ- 
ment for a house of the first class. We have, as stated, every rea- 
son to feel proud of our new theatre. It is in every sense typical 
of our California spirit and progress. It. is the emanation and 
result of California brain and brawn, and this is also true in 
the matter of construction and material. It shows an encourag- 
ing trend toward better things, and is significant of the brother- 
hood of our local spirit and our unity of purpose. The Columbia 
is a model institution of its kind, and will without doubt ad- 
mirably serve its purpose; a firm and solid foundation towards 
the upbuilding and future welfare of the city and its amusement- 
loving people. In the enthusiasm of general felicitations, we 
must not overlook William H. Crane and his admirable organi- 
zation, to whom was entrusted the honor of being the opening 
attraction at the new playhouse. It was but natural that Crane 



,1am ai;v lo, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



9 



would, daring the coarse of the evening be called u] Eo* a 

speech, in which he took occasion to say it was just thiriy-three 
years ago when he »a< a member of the old Baldwin Theatre 
Company, the organization winch had the pleasure of opening 
what was then regarded as our leading amusement institution; 
and he considered it a happy coincidence that he should be so sig- 
nally honored as to be chosen for the present occasion", which be 
was positive was an augury for the future success and prosperity 
of the new Columbia. Crane lias a splendid vehicle, which 
George Ade wrote for his particular purpose and talents, and it 
is brimful of "Adeisms," and liis funny aphorisms. There is 
really only one part in the play, or rather it should be stated 
that it is decidedly a one-part play, and gives Crane all the op- 
portunity he desires for his broad comedy talents. Mr. Ade's 
progress as a playwright is noticeable. In "Father and the 
Boys" we have a play with a distinct plot, without situations in 
the objectionable sense, and with a freedom in the handling 
which makes it a delightful piece of work. We have city life, 
wealth, business, gambling, boxing, the race-track and the min- 
ing camp, but there is an entire fitness in the use of all this 
material. The general scheme of the play is not new, but the 
whole spirit of if is fresh, and it sparkles with the characteristics 
of (irorge Ade. 

A middle-aged wool broker, who has grown rich in the conduct 
of his business, wishes to train his two sons so that they can take 
full charge, and permit him to retire. He had planned the future 
of his boys in detail, having already selected for them the girls 
they were to marry. It seems plain sailing, hut. on their return 
from college, he found that one of them is devoted to the lads of 
society and the other is taken up with athletics. As hi' is exam- 
ining some business letters and papers at his office, a racket is 
heard in the next room, and presently the trainer of bis son 
conies out with a black eye. Much diversion is obtained by in- 
cidents of this sort. With his sense of humor and bis present 
dramatic skill, he makes every possible use of every detail. Noth- 
ing goes to waste. The father discovers that he cannot bring the 
boys to his way of thinking, and on the advice of his Iffn/er, he 
changes his tactics. On the occasion of a dinner party given by 
the hoys, when they introduce a roulette wheel for the diversion 
of Iheir guests, he repairs to bis room, and presently returns in 
bis dress suit and ready to go the pace with them. He is so 
successful that he wins twelve hundred dollars from the "Major" 
who bad previously fleeced one of his unsophisticated sons. The 
next occasion for the exercise of his new ladies is at the race 

track, at which his abandonment to the fascination bf successful 

.betting alarms the sons. The father's game is beginning to work. 
The father has been aided in playing bis new role by a Western 
girl, who has conic to New York, and who secures hi- bonesl ad- 
miration. The Major having gone West, telegraph- lo her an 
offer lor her half interest in a mine. The eircuuistain e- being 

suspicious, it is though! best for her to proceed to the mining 



camp at Goldfield. The Major is thwarted. The girl recovers 
her property and also a long-lost sweetheart. The two sons have 
followed (heir father to the mining earn]) under the belief that 
he is infatuated with, and has run away with the Western girl; 
the diverting complications arc straightened, but not. before the 
father discovers that his sons are at cross purposes with him 
about the girls, but he is satisfied with the choice made by each. 
This is a bare recital of the general action of the play, but falls 
so short of giving any idea of the innumerable incidents and 
hits of humor that one must see the play in order to realize the 
uncommon resources, and we might add the fine art of George 
Ade. The company, beaded by Margaret Bale, is admirable, 
and the settings are perfect in their completeness of appointment. 
All bail to the new Columbia. May it enjoy a splendid period 
of prosperity. 



OUja Nethersole at the Van Ness. 

The shame of it ! The theatre, last Wednesday evening was 
hardly one-third full to see Miss Nethersole; considered through- 
out, the English-speaking world as one of the world's greatest 
emotional actresses; in fact, besides Bernhardt and Hading, and 
possibly Kalich, there is no one else beside Nethersole whom we 
can consider in the same class. There might possibly lie some 
cause for this apparent indifference on the part of the public if 
Miss Nethersole was portraying this week the roles in which we 
know her so well, but she is appearing in an American play bj 
an American author, and incidentally it may he noted thai Miss 
Nethersole in her present vehicle named "The Writing on the 
Wall," does the most effective work of her long career. To miss 
seeing Nethersole in this play is to miss seeing one of the most 
wonderful portrayals of emotional acting that our contemporane- 
ous stage has seen. "When we make this statement, we make it 
deliberately. The merits of the play is not the matter of discus- 
sion here. It may be, and no doubt is, full id' technical defects, 
hid we must not lose sight of the positive fact that it allows Miss 
Nethersole an opportunity for the display of the ripeness of her 
art. Anil then again the play itself ha- a direct human appeal. 
It deals with the horror- ..I' the Xcw York tenements .and leaches 
a vital ami harrowing lesson. A brief Synopsis may not he out 

of place. 

A wile i^ interested in works of charity, ami baa began an 

investigation of conditions in tenement houses in Xcw York 

City.' Her husband is a man of wealth, engrossed in business 

and pitiless in the gain of money. Tie owns many tenement 
houses. His wife has knowledge of the insecure condition of the 
(ire escapes of one of these houses, and begs her husband to make 
them secure lie appears to yield to her, lull he covers up their 
rottenness by directing that they he painted over. The wife 
arranges lor a Christmas party for the children in this particu- 
lar house, and it so happens that the nurse takes the hoy to the 




•■'s MiUioi - 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1010 



party. The house is burned, the fire escapes break under the 
weight of the escaping inmates, many lives are lost, the bo\ 
perishing in this frightful calamity. The husband Ihen sees 
the evil of his ways, promises his wife to reform his methods, 
and we are asked to believe that she now feels that the murderer 
of her son will thereafter be an ideal husband. 

This prospective ideal husband, unfortunately, has another 
vice, which in married men is almost as incurable as the other. 
It is also as unforgivable. He has been unfaithful to his wife, 
and has been spending much of his tainted money on the objeel 
of his infatuation. In directing his secretary to semi a gift of 
jewelry to this woman, be is presently confronted with exposure. 
By an obvious theatrical device a present intended for his wife 
is wrapped in the parcel intended for this woman, the parcel 
intended for her reaching his wife. In her work among the 
tenement house people, the wife has had as co-laborer a settle- 
ment worker or preacher. He falls in love with her, and we have 
a scene in which he declares his love. From the point of view of 
Fate, it was his good fortune to perish in the tenement house 
fire, a circumstance which prevented him from figuring in the 
action later. This is a mere outline of the story, hut in spite of 
the aforesaid defects there are two acts of tenseness that have 
rarely been surpassed. The story as it is told is a direel appeal 
to every man and woman, and brings home to us conditions that 
are absolutely appalling. Miss Nethersole took occasion lasi 
evening after numerous curtain calls, to state that since the pro- 
duction of the play, Trinity Church Corporation of Mew York, 
who. strange to saw own many of the filthiest of these breeding 
places of disease and misery, had torn down more than seventy of 
them. Thus does the stage do its good work in its own way. li 
is a source of deepest regret to the writer to see these half-empty 
houses, which do not speak well for our discernment and judg- 
ment in matters theatrical. By this apparent apathy we are 
driving away from these shores some of the best and strongest of 
the current dramatic attractions. \Yp have stated hefore and 
most emphatically that' it behooves us to awaken to (lie feast 
that is set before us. and partake liberally. Tt is hard to under- 
stand the cause of this evident lethargy. We are people of sup- 
posed intelligence and culture, and we no doubt read the daily 
papers and keep in touch with local theatrical conditions. Then 
what reason or cause can be advanced for such disinterestedness? 
After her frigid reception here, it is evident that Miss Nether- 
sole will pass us by in the future. On this we can depend, and it 
is to he deeply regretted. She has a most capable company, her 
leading man being Harrison Hunter, who has been associated 
with her before. His work at all times is full of earnestness and 
virility. The one setting used in the play is beautiful. The stage 
management is all thai could be asked. \s Miss Nethersole re- 
turns to her old repertoire next week, many of us will have to 
miss seeing her in this wonderful and vivid portrayal of hers. 
Had the patronage warranted it this. week, the new play would 
without doubt have been retained another week. Tt is too bad, 
and again we Bay, the shame of it! 

Paul Gerson. 

* * * 

The Funniest Little Man in the World. 

■ It would be impossible to say how much of a twees d'estime 
and financial Harry Lauder would achieve in San Francisco in 
a hall of decent appointment. To play before a full house in 
Dreamland Bink is like an attempt at blowing smoke rings in a 
gale of wind in the wide out-doors. Mr. Morris presents — first 
and foremost, a fine company of players and a star that is, in 
his own line, unapproachable. Harry Lander's repertoire is 
apparently unlimited. He is held to the last on the program, 
but the preliminaries are most interesting, and. from the jug- 
gler. Monsieur Cyrano, who is easily the cleverest we have seen 
in many a day to Harry Lauder himself, there is nothing left to 
be desired. 

Under other conditions, and in a hall where the accoustics are 
perfect, where the scenic accompaniments are an aid to decep- 
tion, and before a critical musical audience, Mademoiselle Ber- 
llie. the violinist, would have created a furore. 

Julian Eltinge's female impersonations are line. and. while 
that sort of entertainment palls on the male palate, his cobra 
dame is as fine a piece of terpsichorean artistry as it has ever 
been my pleasure to see. The Marimba music by the native 
Guatemalan band was a revelation as to its possibilities with the 
most difficult of classical selections, and was encored to the echo. 

Then came the inimitable Lauder — I wish it might have been 




Miss 'Blanche Li/linn Kaplan, the child pianist, who will givn 
a recital at the Van Ness Theatre on January .'•;. She is the 
twi i>-iiriir-tilii daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Bernard .1/. Kaplan, 
and is said to display a virtuosity wonderful in our so young. 
.1 distinguished group of patronesses will sponsor the recital, 

louder. As it was. the hall was to blame. I could not hear ail 
of the gooil things, but I did not miss any of the wonderful 
facial play of the little Scotchman. His stories and songs are 
catchy to a degree, and it may safely be said that he is the best 
cure for the blues that has ever come to San Francisco. "Stop 
Yer Tiekliu'." "Over the Bounding Sea." "She's Ma Daisy," "I 
Love a Lassie," are gems, but the best of all is the impersonation 

of the cunning Scotch school lad, the typical wee laddie of the 
streets, "Saftesl of the Family." 

Of course there are a vast number of other songs and hits, 
ami it is all so wonderful to find one little man s,> chock-a-block 
full of humor and melody, so thoroughly an artist. Of course, 
much of the success of Harry Lauder is due to the splendid 
system of advertising, the subtle publicity of the Wm. Morris. 
Inc.. ATcstern, publicity makers, hut with any other star it would 
be next to impossible to keep it up. The thing that wins with 
the public is Lauder's absolute naturalness, and his quickness of 
perception is something simply marvelous. He switches his 
songs to suit the taste of his particular audience, and his ability 



January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



11 



tn sense (lie throng's taste is almost magical. It is indeed a 
deft artist who can capture folk with soiur and story in a barn 
calculated for the development of grace in the pedal extremities, 
or for watching the sledge-hammer blows of prize-fighting 
brutes. Km- one wfcelf everj night and the five matinees crowded 
the big hall. 

p. N. B." 

* * * 
"St. Khun" ill Hit Alcazar. 

••Si. Elmo" scored a decided hit at the Alcazar on Tuesday 
night. It was witnessed by a crowded bouse, and was enthu- 
siastically received. 

"St. Elnm" is to many like the reading of an old and cherished 
letter. Pages of the novel from which it was adapted have been 
stained by the tears of our grandmothers, and in the audience 
were more gray-haired people than are usually seen there. But 
the younger generation no doubt found the play hardly less in- 
teresting than did their elders, for its heart theme and its style 
of construction ap'peals to all. The sympathetic audience, after it 
had shed its sometimes silent tears, revived to applaud lustily 
at the end of each act. Both old and young did the hand-clap- 
ping. In dramatizing the book, Willard Holcomh bad a double 
task, and he performed it well. While the atmosphere of the 
novel is thoroughly retained, and the original character-drawing 
adhered to, up-to-date art. in the staging and acting make the 
performance savor of scenes and people of to-day. John [nee, 
as SI. Elmo Murray, realized in his own person all the roman- 
tic attributes of this well-known figure of romance, while Evelyn 
Vaughan makes Edna Earl a young woman well worth all the 
trouble made over her. Granee Travers, as the other girl in the 
ease; Adele Belgarde as St. Elmo's mother; Christie MacLean as 
the garrulous Mrs. Wood, and Bessie Barriscale as her daughter, 
and Louis Bennison, have seldom been seen to better advantage 

than in "St. Elmo." 

• * • 

"The Wolf at the Savoy. 

"The Wolf" made its second appearance in San Francisco at 
the Savoy Theatre this week, playing to practically full houses. 
It is not necessary to go into details in describing this play. II 
is a melodrama pure and simple, using the theme of "crime of 
sin in society" for its plot. The piece is not bound by ;in\ show 
of convention, and at times is rather drawn out. Perhaps the 

strongest point of the performance comes in the figh.1 at the end 
of the play, when the company makes the moat of the opportunity 
provided for theatrical effect. 

The company is an exceptionally strong one. Andrew Hob- 
son plays the part of Jules Beaubien. a young French Canadian, 
and makes the most of it. Miss Bran Johnson, as Hilda McTav- 
ish. gave an excellent portrayal of the part, and made a very 
strong appeal for sympathy. 

Kroni a dramatic standpoint, and the scenic effects produced, 

tins play is well worth seeing. 

# * * 

The Or/iliciiui. 

The Orpheusi is presenting a very strong bill this week. Artnro 
Bernard! Btrikes the popular chord of the audience this 

His impersonations arc excellent, especially when 1: i lines 
the leadership of the orchestra and give! a represent. 1 1 ion from 

famous composers. He also gives a little comedy in which the 

audience is permitted to witness his marvelous chang - The 
other numbers on the programme are also well performed, and 
notwithstanding the ninny attractions at other play-houses, al- 
most every seat in the house is occupied at every perforn 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 

At the Van Ness Theatre. 01 gS Nethersole will enter into the 
second and last week of her local engagement Mon.hn I _'ht. 
Besides "The Writing on the Wall," Miss Nethersole will be 
Been in B Belection of the besl roles of her extensive r.|i. i 

and will include performances of "Magda," "The S i 

Tanqneray," and "Onmille." 

Louis James, the eminent tragedian, supported by the charm- 
ing Aphie James, will be the Van Ness's following attrai 
Mr. James is this season presenting two elaborate Shakespearean 
revivals, Edwin Booth's version of "King Henry VIII," and 

"The Merchant of Veni> . 

» » * 

William H. Or gment ai the new Columbia Theatre 

will continue for a second and last week, commencing with 



Monday night, January 17lh. Matinees will be given Wednes- 
day and Saturday. 

Marie Cahill, who made a big hit here season before last with 
the production of "Marrying Mary." will be the second attrac- 
tion at the Columbia, opening there on Monday. January 34th, 

in her newest musical play success, "The Boys and Betty." 

* * * 

The eight Geishas, who will appear next week for the first 
lime in this city at the Orpheuiii, are real Japanese girls im- 
ported Ft i Nagasaki, Japan, and are considered to be one 

of the most remarkable novelties brought to this country for 
vaudeville. 

Jean Clermont's Circus is a novelty from Germany. He has a 
most pretentious display of dogs, ponies and roosters. A French 
poodle sits up and plays "The Last Rose of Summer" on a piano. 
A fox terrier sings a tune from "The Merry Widow." Clermant 
himself is a comedian who helps the dogs, etc., in their work. 

Brown, Harris and Brown, comedians, will be a new number 
on the programme. 

The Doherty Sisters, Anna and Lillian, will appear with their 
songs, dances and witticisms. 

Next week will be the last of the Willy Pantzer Company, 
t'na Clayton and Company, Mr. and Mrs. Voelker, and of Ber- 
nards 

The last performance of Eugene Walter's great melodrama. 
"The Wolf," will be given at the Savoy Theatre this Saturday 

al'tern l and evening, and a! the matinee Sunday, Cohan and 

Harris will present, for one week only, the comedy success, 

"Brewster's Millions." 

* * * 

The Alcazar management has decided to continue "St. Elmo" 
for another week. All the Alcazar favorites will be in the cast. 



Savoy Theatre 



Phones Market 130 
Home" J 2832 

McAllister, near Market. 

This Saturday aflemoon and evening, last limes of THE WOLF. 

Starting Sunday matinee, Jan. 16. Other matinees Thursday and Saturday. 

Cohan & Harris" comedians, with ROYAL TRACY, present 

BREWSTER'S MILLIONS 

The supreme comedy success, a dramatization by Wlnchell Smith and Byron 

Ongley of George Barr McCutcheon's famous novel, and showing the famous 

yacht scene. Splendid cast. 

Prices — 25c to St.oo. Thursday matinees. 35c, 50c and 75c. 

Next— Max Figman in "Mary Jane's Pa." 

New Orpheum gra»,sri,d P .w.., 

Safe*! and Mosl Marnificenl Theatre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. 

MATINEE EVERY DAY. 

EIGHT GEISHA girls. Dainty Native Japanese Dancers: JEAN 
CLERMONT'S "BURLESKE" CIRCUS; BROWN, HARRIS AND 
BROWN; THE DOHERTY SISTERS; UNA CLAYTON & CO.; 
MR. AND MRS FREDERICK VOELKER; NEW ORPH EUM 
MOTION PICTURES. List w.-ck Immense hits WILLY PANTZER 
COMPANY ana ERNARDL 

Evening prices. 10c. 25c, 60c. 75c. Box seats. $1. Matinee prices 
(except Sundays and holidays), 10c, 25c. 50c. PHONE DOUG- 
LAS 70. 

Qeary and Mason Sts. 

Marx & Co.. Managers. 
Franklin 160. 



Columbia Theatre 



Phom 



i.iry 17th. S reek. Matinees Wednes- 

day and Saturday. No Sunday performances. Charles Frohman 
presents 

WM. H. CRANE. 

in George Ades 1 "FATHER and THE BOYS." 

Scats. 12. $1.50. J! 

Monday. January' 21th- MAR'E CM11I.I. in "The Boys and Betty." 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NE88 AVE 
AND OROVE STREET 
Gotttob, Marx & Co.. Manac 
Thones: Market I 

P^glnnlng Monday night. January 17th. Matinee Saturday. 
During the second and last w ngagement of Miss Olga 

NETHERSOLE. 
the noted emotional actress, will he seen In "MAGDA." "THE 
SECOND MRS. TAN'.'IARY "CAMILI.E. " and "THE WRITING 
ON THE WALL" 

Coming. January 21th— LOUIS JAMES In "Henry VIII" and "Mer- 
chant of Venice." 



New Alcazar Theatre 



Garner Salter aad Sterner Street* 
Wa—Wstl— 

Balasco and Mayer. Owners anj Managers. Absolutely "Class A" Building. 
Monday. January 17th. starts the second and final week of 

ST. ELMO. 
Adapted or Willard Holcomh. from Augusta J. Evans- Wilson"! 
famous novel of the same title. ONLY AUTHORIZED VERSION. 
Prices— Nights. 26c. to »1. Matinee. 25-- to 50c. 
Matinee Saturday and Sunday. 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 



iBjopr^^r 



. ^rXIETX 



a. 







This lias not been a season of intimate entertaining, and yel 
the charge of dullness, which some carping observers insist upon, 
could not logically be sustained. Each season has its idiosyn- 
cracies, its moods and tenses and this particular season has a 
personality and temperament at wide variance with the season 

which preceded it. There have been c paratively few informal 

affairs — those intimate gatherings of a few score people. As a 
result, the calendar, which at this time of the year should bulge 
copiously with social engagements, has rather an attenuated 
look. The days are not jammed with engagements, dovetailing 
one into the other as though a cabinet maker had fitted them. 
Last year the energetic ones illustrated the theory of perpetual 
motion, hut this year they have been able to get Forty winks 
between engagements. 

But the mailer of quantity is more than balanced by the quality 
of tin- entertainments. There have been fewer "dinky" affairs, 
ami instead of our hostess entertaining in a modest fashion, a 
number have banded together and magnificently liquidated their 
social obligations. Naturally the currency ha- been issued in a 
ball room, for there is no other way in which a number of women 
can with dignity settle their debts. Fancy a couple of dozen 
women combining to give a bridge party! Such frugality could 
not flourish outside of the most barren Xew England Slate. But 
a ball is a neat device for cutting a smooth thick slice of money. 
Elaborate appointments, including a supper with plenty of cham- 
pagne for three or four hundred people — you have a recipe which 
will effectively reduce any bank account several hundred pounds. 
The combination balls have been hostessed by two gets, the Cin- 
derellas. who gave their first hall lasl week, and the "Patron- 
esses," as they have hern christened for want of a better name. 
Twenty-four friends combined to give two halls each hostessed 
by twelve of the subscribers who weri' each allowed ten invita- 
tions that were sent out with a lisi of the hostesses. This name- 
less combination caused a great deal 'if confusion to the society 
scribblers who found it difficult to make their nouns ami verbs 
agree when there wasn't a proper noun hanging around lit to be 
introduced to the verb. Somehow the sobriquet "Patronesses" 
came into use and has filled the breach. Society itself now speaks 
of these affair- as the "Patronesses," ami although the hostesses 
dislike the name, it clings. Next year, if these same women en- 
tertain in this fashion, they will probably choose a name to avoid 
having one thrust upon them. 

Call them what you will, you could not spell the hall at the 
St. Francis on Friday evening anything bul Success, with a 
capital 8. The arrangements were perfeel in every detail, ami 
the ballroom reflected the most picturesque collection of gowns — 
tunic effects outlined with fur predominating. Miss Jennie 
Crocker ami Miss Genevieve King, two of the young hostesses, 
did not receive. Miss Crocker is in mourning for her uncle, and 
Miss King is visiting in the East. The Crocker family have fre- 
quently hail lo withdraw from society owing to ll tiquette of 

mourning. I remember once Mrs. Will Crocker, who hail jus! 
come out of retirement having foregone entertainment out of re- 
spect to some very distant relative, planned a large affair. She 
went to the country, and over the long distance wire was told 
that the function would have to lie postponed. "Who is dead?" 
she asked in fear and trembling. "The cat." was the answer, and 
needless to say Mrs. Crocker thought the joke very stupid. 

The new style in hair dressing has now' become so prevalent that 
one wonders what has become of the puffs ami curls of the yester- 
days. The moli cap effect has created a change in hair ornaments, 
ami there is a tremendous effort to gain startling and original 
elfeet-. But as yet no one has perpetrated the vagaries i n which 
some of the French women are indulging. A friend who has just 
returned from Paris tells me that she saw a woman at the opera 
with a very life-like duck, even to the web feet, on her smoothly 
coiffed hair. The effect was so ludicrous that in San Francisco 
an\ good sportsman would go a-gunning for a wife or daughter 
who would wear a duck head-dress. Mrs. Spencer Eddy (Lur- 
line Spreckels), who is out here visiting her grandmother, Mrs. 



PALACE HOTEL 



ANNOUNCES THE SERVICE OF 

AFTERNOON TEA 

IN THE 

GRAND COURT EACH AFTERNOON. 

Palace Hotel Company 



Dure, has appeared at all the recent functions in adorable gowns 

that do not even suggest the bizarre, although they are exceed- 
ingly picturesque, tier health has not been. very robust of laic 
and if was largely on that account that her husband accompanied 

her to California. But in spite of her health, she is looking 
radiantly pretty — even more s ( > than when she was out here 
last time. 

The dinners and supper parlies which marked the opening of 
the Columbia Theatre, ami the attendant thrill of the new play- 
house, made Monday a conspicuous day of the week. Margaret 
Dale, who is playing with the Crane Company, has many friends 
in society here, ami is being entertained as much as her time 
permits. Her particular friend. Rose Hooper Plottner, the 
miniature painter, is en route to Honolulu, just now. much lo 
the regret uf the pretty actress. Mrs. C. L. Peters* bridge part] 
on Monday at the Palace was a substantial prop to the shaky 
popularity of bridge parties, which used to span every day and 
are now sometimes not in evidence fur a week. 

Tuesday was a busy day with a big tea in the afternoon — Mrs. 
Frederick Stott's compliment to Miss Kathleen Farrell. The 
directors of the Telegraph Hill Settlement gave a tea in their 
neighborhood house on the hill, and the forthcoming production 
of "Professor Napoleon" was the chief topic of conversation. In 
the evening, soviet' divided itself between the hall room of the 
St. Francis, where Mme. Marcella Semhrieh sang, and the Army 
and Navy Club on California street, where the officers entertained 
at a pretty dance. 

Wednesday, favored day of Hymen, recorded a wedding. Miss 
Marian Wright and Henry Avery Campbell plighting their 
troth in the bride's home in Scott street. Mrs. Jack Wilson's 
tea in her Pacific avenue home kept the streets in that neighbor- 
hood blocked with automobiles from 3 until <>, while indoors a 
merry throng caught the belated glow of the holiday spirit. A 
number of the debutantes came in late to the tea from the bridge 
party, at which Miss Helen Jones entertained, hi the evening 
a large contingent of young people went mil in the Presidio to 
the hop at i he officers' club-house. 

Thursday had a notable luncheon for the debutantes, Miss 
Hairline Matson entertaining twenty-four girls in honor of Miss 
Agnes Tillman. Friday was a dinner-day, fifteen or twenty 
dinner parlies preceding the two dances which illuminated the 
night — the Patronesses' ball at the St. Francis and the dance 
of the very voting set at Century Club Hall. Saturday will be tea 
day — two large leas giving flavor to the afternoon. Mrs. George 
Hill Stoddard will hostess a reception at her own home, and Mis. 

John Baker, Jr., will preside ai a lea at the Fairmont. 



BLANCO 


9 


s 


O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS 






PHONE FRANKLIN 9 






No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 


finest cafe in America. Our new annex 


is 


now 


open. 







January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



13 



S©ckD anndl lP®ir§@ia(SiS litems 



/f = 



Throe chamber concerts will be given on Monday evening, 
January 34th, Thursday evening February 1 Tth, and Thursday 
evening, March 17th, in the concert hall of the new Kohler & 
('hast' building, 36 O'Farrell street, San Francisco, at 8.15 p. m., 
under the direction of Mrs. Oscar Mansl'eldt, piano; Signor An- 
tonio de Grassi, violin; and Mr. Weiiesclav Villalpando, cello. 

The patronesses are: Mrs. Frank Larhpson Brown, Mrs. J. J. 
Brice, Mrs. George Caswell, Mrs. C. W. Clark, Mrs. Wm. H. 
Crocker, Mrs. Clinton Day. Mrs. Tirey L. Ford, Mrs. Wm. Gers- 
tle. Mr.;. Mark Gerstle, Mrs. James Monroe Gbewy, Mrs. Ralph 
Harrison, Mrs. Wickham Havens, Mrs. Emma Shatter Howard, 
Mrs. Huntington, Mrs. Clarence Martin Mann, Mrs. Eleanor 
Martin, Mrs. Win. H. Mills, Mrs. Oscar Maurer, Mrs. Frank 
Howard Payne. Mrs. Florence Porter Pfingst, Mrs. Mezes Philips 
Wynne, Mrs. Frederick Stratton, Mrs. William T. Sesnon, Mrs. 
Henry Clay Taft, Mrs. James Ellis Tucker, Mrs. Phoebe Hearst. 
The patrons are Mr. Beylar'd, Dr. Arnold (iontlie, Mr. Richard 
Hotaling, Mr. Richard Tobin, Mr. Raphael Weill. Tickets may 
he obtained from Madame de Grassi, Kid Presidio avenue, San 
Francisco. 

All society will crowd tin.' Pavilion Kink at Sutter ami Pierce 
on the night of February the 8th. The occasion will bo the 
masked ball given by the Ladies' Auxiliary of the Children's 
Hospital. The proceeds will go to the Children's Hospital. The 
management has secured the services id' both a brass ami a string 
band for this function, and the hall will be open to the public at 
$5 a ticket. This ticket will include the supper. 

There are to be sixty-one boxes, and these an' $50 each. It is 
in these loges that society top-notehers will foregather. The 
patronesses' list is an imposing array, and is as follows: Mrs. 
Gus Taylor, Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Sam Boardman, Mrs. 
Brownell, Mrs. Worthington Amos, Mrs. F. W. McNear, Miss 
Jennie Crocker, Miss Mary Josselyn, Miss L Cadwallader, Moss 
Emily Carolan, Mrs. F. T. Scott. The ladies auxiliary will he 
lead in the grand march by Ned G-reenway, who has promised I" 
outdo himself. Men of note are to judge as to whom shall he 
awarded the prizes. There will be two firsl prizes, one to the best 
costumed lady, and the other to the besi costumed gentleman. 
The nature of the prize, which will be artistic and valuable, has 
not been determined at the lime of going to press for ibis issue 
of the News Letter. There are to be a cumber of other prizes, 
too. 

Mr. and Mrs. David Rlankenhorn, bride and groom, of Pasa- 
dena, and a most charming young couple, are at De] Monte for 
a week or so. Mr. Blankenhors is prominent in real estate cir- 
cles of Pasadena ami Los Angeles. 

Other brides and grooms arriving during the week at Del 
Monte were Mr. and Mrs. Morgan Wallace of New York. Mr. 
and Mis. ('. Triplet! of Oakland, Mr. and Mrs. Charles iliilton 
of Berkeley, .Mr. and Mrs. Jerome J. Marx of San Pram iseo, 
Mr. ami Mrs. Guy E. Milins, of Wm fork. 

The Hermoso Cotillion Cluli assembled Saturday evening in 
the Colonial hall room of (he St. Francis for the third dancing 
party of the season, and the occasion was as enjoyable a* the 

preceding dances given by the popular social organizations. The 

decorations in the ball room were entirely in green, with ferns 
and tall palms forming a background for the pretty gowns. The 
ball was given individually by the new diversions thai were in- 

■troduced, the entire dam ing i lub being led through mam intri- 
cate figures i>\ Carl F. Ernest and Mis- Camille de Poem. 

Major-Genera] Thomas 11. Parry, commanding the D 
-nient of California, is expected back at the st. Francis this 
where he will remain for a short time before moving to bis 

manenl quarters at Fori Baker. Societj considers the presence 
of General and Mrs. Barry at this port to mean jolrj times the 

army set. and have been making a great pet of Miss 
parry, who has been the complimented guee 

teas. 

i in ucj (,> Page 1}.) 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

A comfortable, high order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN. formerly manager of St. 

Duncan's. 



^ 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 



SPECIAL 

AFTER-THEATRE SUPPER 
ONE DOLLAR 



^: 



J 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 







HOTELSAVOY 

SEATTLE 

Twelve Stories of 
Solid Gomfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping district. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, fit 1.50 ap 


/4^%\ 


tHifcZ^^ 





UNEXCELLED TRAIN SERVICE 

DAILY TO AND FROM 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE EXPRESS, the through parlor car train, 
leaves San Francisco daily at 2:00 p. m. arriving at 
Del Monte at 5:43 p. m. 

DEL MONTE LOCAL leaves San Francisco at 3:00 p.m. 
daily arriving at Del Monte at 7:21 p. m. in time for 
dinner. 

An ideal arrangement for week end parties 
H. R. WARNER. Manager Hotel Del Monte. California 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. Sun in Every Room. 

Elaborate Furnisnin^s. Excellent Cuisine. Large Lobby arid 

Reception Room. Grill Room. Dininsr Room. 

Mrs. W. F. Morris. Proprietor, formerly of Hotel Cecil 

Bush Street, San Francisco 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal 

Fourth ftJKJ Main Stl 



American Plan 

REOPENED 

Ratei p«r Day. $2.50 Rooms without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. 11.00. 14.50 snd M00. 



European Plan 

11.00 per day and up 
With bath, tl 10 and up 



T. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



FRITZ MULLER & SONS 

Proprietors 

Sous Csssocr. IsW 



Bismarck Cafe 

Leads in catering to San Francisco's epicures and music lc 
POPULAR PRICES 
Music noon, evenings and after theatre by the famous Herr Ferdi- 
nand Stark's Vienna Orchestra 
PACIFIC BUILDING San Francisco MARKET AND FOURTH 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 



SOCIAL AND PERSONAL ITEMS. 
(Continued from Page IS.) 

Palace Inaugurates Special After-Dinner Sapper Service. 

The announcement that the Palace has inaugurated an after- 
theatre supper service in the Men's Grill Eoom lias hail the effect 
of filling that delightful place each evening with the after-theatre 
crowd. An orchestra plays in the grill, which, while devoted 
exclusively to men during the day, throws back its doors to the 
ladies after nine-thirty. When the great glass doors opening 
into the beautiful court are all thrown back in the evening, it 
makes the grill almost a part of the court itself, partaking of 
its life and gayety. This movement on the part "i the Palace is 
one which is greatly appreciated by the society folk of the city. 
Murum is served as the wine of preference. 

* * * 

Miss Bertha Monroe Rickotf was one of the hostesses of the 
past week, her pleasure for a company of friends being a pie i lily 
appointed dinner. Miss Kickolf entertained at the Hotel Vic- 
toria, where she is spending the winter. 

Mrs. James H. Hough, of Stockton, is spending several days in 
the city prior to sailing for Honolulu, where she will join her 
sister and daughter, who have been enjoying a tour of the islands. 
Mrs. Hough is a guest at the Hotel Victoria. 

Mrs. Edward H. Kittredge entertained at luueheyn at the 
Palace Hotel last Friday, in honor of her daughter, Mrs. Prank 
P. Baldwin, who is visiting from Honolulu. The table was very 
prettily decorated in autumn leaves and red berries. Among 
those present were Mrs. Florence Porter Plingsl, Mrs. Henry 
Poster Hutton, Mrs. William Cluff, Mrs. Eleanor Doe, Mrs. Regi- 
nald Knight Smith, Mrs. Magee, Mrs. Charles Wheeler, Mrs. 
Charles K. Harley, Mrs. W'ileutl, Mrs. Bentley, eh . 

The calendar of the Palace continues to be filled up eacii week 
with all manner of affairs varying from the most elaborate sub- 
scription ball held in the State in recent years to the simplest 
luncheon or dinner parties. The Cinderella Pall given in the 
Golden ball room by the matrons who in days gone by gave the 
beautiful dances which have now passed into San Francisco's 
social traditions. The twenty-live hostesses who in the earlier 
days were among the city's most charming belles, received their, 
guests and under their direction everything moved along as 
smoothly as could be desired. Each of the patronesses were en- 
titled to twenty-five invitations, and the magnificent ball room, 
was crowded with the beauty and chivalry of the city and the 
State. The patronesses of the affair were Mrs. Edward L. Eyre, 
Mrs. Harry Babeoek, Mrs. William S. Tevia, Mrs. William Bourn, 
Mrs. William Elkins, Jr., Mrs. Frank Carolan, Mrs. John Price, 
Mrs. Charles Page, Mrs. Thomas Breese, Mrs. Willis Polk, Mrs. 
George Howard, Mrs. Percy Moore, Mrs. William Tubbs, Mrs. 
Gerald Kathbone, Mrs. William Gwin, Mrs. George Boyd, Mrs. 
Joseph Donohue, Madame de Tristan. 

Among the recent arrivals at tbe Fairmont Hotel was Baron 
Dairoku Kikuchi, president of the Imperial University of Japan, 
and one of the distinguished educators of the world. The Baron 
Kikuchi arrived on the Nippon Maru, and comes to America 
for the purpose of delivering a series of lectures. in the various 
universities, and of studying educational methods in vogue here. 
After a stay at the Fairmont for two or three weeks, he will go 
direct to New York, where his first lecture will be delivered be- 
fore the Civic Forum. Baron Kikuchi is a polished gentleman 
and fluent talker. He was born in 1855, and was educated at 
Tokyo, afterwards going lo University College, London, St. 
John's College, Cambridge. He was raised to the peerage in 
1902, and holds degrees from many universities of Japan and 
Europe. 

* * * 

A musicale will be given in the ballroom of the St. Francis 
Hotel Friday evening, January 21, 1910, at eight-thirty p. m. 
Miss Georgianna Strauss, assisted by a number of well-known 
artists, will render an attractive programme. Miss Strauss will 
give a programme largely operatic, consisting of The Flower- 
Song from "Faust;" "Stride la Vampa,'' "Trovatore ;" selections 
from "Amico Fritz," "Samson and Delilah," "Les Huguenots," 
"Mignon," and selected songs. The accompanyist will be Fred- 
erick Maurer, Jr. Bariton solos will be given by Oscar Sidney 
Frank as follows: 1. Du Bothe Pose, Haiss Somner (never be- 
fore rendered in San Francisco); 2. Florian Song, Godard; 3. 
"I Love You Truly," Carrie Jacobs Bond. Tickets are on sale 



at Sherman, Clay & Co., and Eiler's music Company. The com- 
mittee in charge consists of Mrs. W. W. Wymore, 48 Castro 
street, Park 911 ; Mrs. D. J. Patterson, 69 Devisadero street, 
Park 759; Mrs. R. H. Maddan, Hotel Savoy, Franklin 471— to 
whom any enquiries may be addressed. 

* * * 

Musical San Francisco has been suffering for a long time from 
dry rot. It has not made any great effort to meet the emergencies 
of the day. in extenuation of the fact that musical attractions 
are met by empty houses, it is said that San Francisco is not 
musical. The News Letter is pleased to announce that Fitz- 
patrick and Norwood, after looking over the local situation thor- 
oughly, and after having satisfied themselves that here was a 
fallow field ready for harvest, have decided to gather the crop 
sure to come through good management. These people are pub- 
licity men in musical matters, and they are persistent and not 
niggardly in the use of printers' ink, besides having an intimate 
knowledge of the artistic nature. Hereafter, artists coming to 
the coast may be sure of splendid treatment, and the bureau will 
bring on attractions so well advertised that they cannot fail of 
good houses. The agency has the endorsement of the New York 
Musical Courier. 

• • * 

Mrs. M. II. de Young has issued cards for a cotillion, which 
she will give on January 18th, for her daughter, Miss Kathleen. 
The guest list includes about two hundred, nearly half of whom 
are from among the friends of Miss de Young in the younger 
set. and it is for their pleasure that the cotillion has been ar- 
ranged to take place in the ballroom of the de Young home on 
California street. The remainder of the guests are friends of 
the family of the older married contingent, who will be enter- 
tained during the progress of the dance in a manner as pleasant 
to them as is dancing to the younger element. Pleasurable an- 
ticipation marks the coming of the event, as it is the only cotil- 
lion which society has enjoyed this winter, and that the hospi- 
tality of Mrs. de Young and her daughter is to be expressed 
through, this medium is causing great satisfaction to those of 
the guests who will dance, as well as those who will participate 
in the other pleasures of the evening. 



Britton & Eey have removed to a new and more central 

and commodious location on Sacramento, near Leidesdorf street, 
right in the center of the financial and insurance quarters. The 
linn is one of the largest of the up-to-date lithographers and 
engravers, keeping constantly abreast of the times. 




Ladies 
Tailor 



It is, with great pleasure that we announce tbe opening of our down town establishment 
at 418 SUTTER STREET between Powell and Stockton, with the newest materials of im- 
ported and domestic patterns of high quality. We have always succeeded in pleasing our 
customers and are now better prepared than ever before to give perfect satisfaction. We 
have the latest approved styles from the leading fashion centers of the world, and our gar- 
ments are guaranteed to fit perfectly. 

Fair Prices, Best of Work, Fine Materials, Correct Styles. Perfect Fit, All that's Latest, 
All that's Good. Your trial order is respectfully solicited and we invite you to call whether 
you are ready to place your order or not. Very respectfully yours. 



Oscar Vogel 



Coughlan Co. 

(MRS. J. SHEEHAN) 

FINE MILLINERY 

will be in their permanent location about 

January 1, 1910 

at 

49 Grant Ave. 



January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



15 



Tils® Ksvs® Tsrudk OircmH E^ftttM; 



The News Letter demands dial the police prohibit betting of 
any sort at the track. Oral betting seems to mean greater disas- 
ter to the public than the old system, because it invites fraud ami 
treachery and makes sneaks by the wholesale. The News Letter 
has kept quiet, being willing to give the "noble horse" a chance 
in competition with "ignoble man." It is a commentary, a sad 
one, that we must perforce protect man from his own vices; that 
we must not only warn him officially as to the pitfalls in his way, 
but that we must erect barriers to prevent his deliberately plung- 
ing into crime. Yet, this is true, and being true, the law must 
be invoked to make it impossible for man to sin. If his sinning 
were to injure him alone, if no other member of society, innocent 
of any intent at wrong or crime, should be hurt, we might say 
that it were "a good thing for the fool," for it eliminates the 
need of the early approach of the long-heralded killer of idiots 
and fdols ! 

The race track avers that the fool will be a fool despite all 
restraints, and that, if he doesn't gamble in one direction he will 
in another, but this argument is proven fallacious through the 
records of crime. We find that during the short time that the 
race track was out of existence the eases of embezzlement were 
few and far between. The track had not been opened more than 
a week before the embezzling began, and this was followed by 
suicides, murders, and wife beating. In the last week a criminal 
case has cropped up every day in some of the bay cities, and in 
every instance the cause was the loss of money on the track. 

If you win you lose ; if you lose, you lose. That is how the oral 
betting game goes on. There is absolutely no protection for the 
dupe of the doped game. .He is always the loser, for the bookie 
keeps all winnings, and the bettor must keep his mouth shut. One 
man from Los Angeles was allowed to win ten thousand dollars, 
and was euchred out of two thousand six hundred by a fake game 
that a child could have seen through. In another instance, a man 
returned home from the races, a loser, and because his wife would 
not hand over her savings, a paltry sum of two dollars, the man 
beat her almost into a jelly. Two men committed suicide. Their 
epitaphs might well read: "It was the track I" This is the record 
. of one week in San Francisco. It is the known cases. 

The track has had a fair chance. Not one of the daily papers 
has attempted to stop its juggernaut progress. The weeklies 
have all kept quiet. One of the daily newspapers has, inadvert- 
ently or maliciously, placed a lot of school news on the page 
containing the dope sheet of the track. It is hoped that this 
was not purposely done. At any rate, the act demonstrated that 
the editor held the track and oral betting as respectable callings, 
come-to-stay institutions, and worthy of the confidence "I parents 
and school children. The track and oral belting has bad a fair 
show. It is worse than a failure. It is more of a sneak than ever. 
It enters the counting house and the home with gum shoi 

ami it lays the trail of poison in even walk ol lifi 
the crop is DEATH AND DISGRACE! 
We call upon the newspapers, there were Eorty-c 

the glorious last crusade, to take up the Bght and to 

hark and oral betting, and, this time, forever. We call upon 

the Anti-Race Track Leagues to come once again infc 

we call open the Trust and Casualty ime with the 

ethers into iliis light and kill the snake. Come to tie 

The buttle is on, and the track must go. 

It is not to be hoped that the great papers of San Fri 
these reformers for revenue only, will take up the slogan. They 
have inner attacked (he track. Ft is too profitable! They dare 
not quarrel with their pocket-boo organ- of thi 

nion good," these piping "voices o( the peepul." So w. 
call on the country press, die honest country press that 
splendid yeoman sen ice in the old war against the ev - 
to kill the track and its following of crimes. Come to colors. 
The war is on ! 



OBITUARY. 



County Recorder A. K. Grim, of Alameda County, passed 
away last Friday at his home in Berkeley. Mr. Grim was a ma n 
of note in Alameda County, and well known and respected. The 
county is without a recorder, and apart from the distinct loss 
there is the additional quandary of any provision made to supply 
the vacancy-made by Mr. Grim's demise. 



The combination of the artistic and the practical is 

rarely met with among photographers. In the Taber-Stanford 
Studio at 110-118 Geary street. San Francis, o. may claim this 
distinctive gain. Here is a staff of artists second to none in 

inntry. These gentlemen are experts in the pro 
They produce only the best in photography. 



Mrs. Telitha C. Shortridge, mother of Samuel M. and Chas. 
M. Shortridge, of San Francisco, died suddenly on Monday at the 
home of her daughter, Mrs. Clara Shortridge Foltz, at Los An- 
geles. She was 85 years old and had but recently returned from 
a visit in the North. When it was seen that she was critically 
-ill, her sons were notified. They left for Los Angeles immedi- 
ately. Mrs. Shortridge was up and apparently well until mid- 
afternoon, when she collapsed. Death was due to age. 



MIDWINTER NUMBER OF THE LOS ANGELES TIMES. 

The Midwinter Number of the Los Angeles Times (200 
pages) is out. It is an exceptionally comprehensive exploitation 
of the life, progress and resources of the Southwest, with the city 
of Los Angeles as the point d'appui. One entire section of 32 
pages is devoted to "The Big Things Los Angeles is Doing," in- 
cluding the acquisition of a municipal .harbor, the beginning of 
an unheard-of aqueduct 240 mile3 long, estimated to cost $23,- 
000,000, to bring water from the Sierras, and the building of 
;!,000 miles of good roads through the county at a cost of $3,500,- 
000. 



Mme. Sembrich and her singing is the talk of San Fran- 
cisco, and her wonderful voice, with its reed-like notes, its round, 
clear and perfectly placed volume, has been likened by many to 
the flow from the throat of a bird. It is well to note that Mme. 
Sembrich, after a long search lor adequate instrumental sym- 
pathy for this rare vocal timbre, finally found it in the Baldwin 
piano. It is worthy of note thai on one occasion when a Baldwin 
was not available the diva demanded a Mute accompaniment 
rather than imperil her performance. 



Some disappearances are less deceptive than some ap- 
pearances. 



PLEASING DESERTS 
always win favor for the housekeeper. The many possibilities of Bor- 
den's Peerless Brand Evaporated Milk (unsweetened) make it a boon 
to the woman who wishes to provide these delicacies for her family with 
convenience and economy. Dilute Peerless Milk to desired richness and 
use same as fresh milk or cream. 



The Star Hair Remedy, the best tonic ; restores color to 

gray hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new. hair. All 
druggists. 



Santa Fe 



12 hours 
quicker 



To 



Kansas City— Chicago 



and 
Denver 



TOURIST EXPRESS 



Leave 

San Francisco 



8:00 p. m. 



every 
day 



Arrive Denver 2:30 p. m. Third day 

Arrive Kansas City 9.05 p.m. Third day 
Arrive Chicago 10:30 a. m. Fourth day 

Other transcontinental trains leave San Francisco 
7:15 a. m. and 10:00 p. m. 

For detail Information phone or call at Santa Fe offices 
67J Market St. San Francisco— 1112 Broadway. Oakland 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 



By Harriett Watson Capwell. 



i 



The most interesting milk maid of the present day is Mrs. 
Scott Durand, the well-known Chicago clubwoman, There was 
a time in (he brocaded ]>ast when every one's pince-nez was turned 
on poor, pretty Marie Antoinette, sitting on her gilt milking- 
stool, with its knock-kneed legs, and looking as much Hie pari as 
a bit of Dresden. Then there was that milkmaid of Thomas 
Hardy's, "Tess of the D'Urbervilles." We finished the book feel- 
ing damp all the way through, and before we could dry our (ears 
along came Mrs. Fiske impersonating the part, and we sighed 
and wept over Tess once more. However, neither these two 
heroines, nor any others that 1 can recall, have had a star of 
destiny that crossed a certified Milky Way. Marie Antoinette 
would never get a certificate from a modern Board of Health to 
play in her dairyette. She did not disinfect the air which the 
cows breathed, and history does not record whether she herself 
used an antiseptic wash on the sugar she fondly fed her favorite 
bossy. As for Tess, she could scarcely read ami write during the 
period that she served as a milk maid, and it is now unlawful for 
any one who has not a university degree to associate with COWS. 
Unless you can quote the Latin pastorals in the original, figure 
the maximum capacity of a suction pump, and wear a Creek let- 
ter fraternity pin, you cannot enter a first-class dairy farm. 

I have met Mrs. Durand and 1 believe that she disclaimed hav- 
ing a diploma from a cow college. So like the other famous lac- 
teal heroines of history, she does not quite meet the requirements 
of modern dairying. However, the other day. the Farmers' In- 
stitute sat up and took notice of her, almost within sight of l be 
stately buildings of the Chicago University. It was an imper- 
tinent slap at Science, which insists that a cow can tell a uni- 
versity degree from a cowslip — which is going some, for we :ill 
know people with university degrees who cannot tell a cow from 
a cowslip. Mow-ever, the practical fanners, grudginglv seconded 
by the scientific "cusses,'' acknowledged (hat one of the model 
dairy farms of Illinois must be credited to Mrs. Durand. She 
, was asked to give some pointers on sanitation, separators and (he 
other factors that make a model dairy farm. 

And then came the boomerang, which almost made the watered 
milk rattling o'er the stony streets in microbe infested cans (urn 
in(o Limburger then and there. For Mrs. Durand stated that 
the perfectly pure milk from her complimented farm had earned 
her $12,000 last year, which money she used to establish a free 
kindergarten in Chicago. The published accounts quote Mrs. 
Durand: "I became interested in the question of good milk for 
babies, and the more I tried the more fascinated [-became. The 
outrages perpetrated upon the people by careless and money-! 
grubbing milkmen made my blood boil, and I made up my mind 
that I would show them bow to run a dairy and make mone] . and 
at the same time make the dairy barn as clean and wholesome as 
my kitchen." 

Here is a cue for some San Francisco clubwoman. Then' are 
plenty of them interested in pure milk for babies. Dr. Adelaide 
Brown, Mrs. Adolphus Craupner, Dr. Caroline Rosenberg, Mrs: 
Frank Deering and a number of others, are furthering a crusade 
for certified milk. But why doesn't some clubwoman who is 
tired of repeating the formula of pure milk and disseminating 
knowledge of the danger of impure milk, lake to the woods and 
try to run a dairy? There is the Chicago precedent in Mr-. 
Durand, and closer home you have Mrs. Sherman, one of the 
most successful '■farmers" in California. 

I met Mrs. Sherman at a woman's dub conference. She i- a 
motherly-looking woman with a smile that gets right down into 
the creases of your heart, and besides attending to her house and 
her duties as an officer in a woman's club. Bhe raises Percheroi] 
horses for the market, cultivates the grape on an extensive vine- 
yard and runs a dairy, the milk supplied from her own herds. Of 
course she doesn't actually do all these things herself, but from 
the time the baby venture started some twenty years ago, until it 
grew into the "show place" of the county, ami made her a ri< b 
woman, hers has been the managing head and the directing 
hand of the allied enterprises. 

I should like to see some club interested in pure food supply 



hack the right kind of women to produce that supply. It would 
be an interesting experiment for the women of the University 
Alumnae Association, which is vitally interested in the pure milk 
crusade, lo start a model dairy and lei some competent woman 
work out its destiny. Of course, the success of the thing depends 
on the choice of the woman, and it is impossible to be sure before- 
hand that the selection is a wise one. Hut (here is a forecast of 
danger ahead of us because of the desertion of the soil for the 
cilies. Why sbgubl not the woman's clubs endeavor to stem the 
(ide by helping women to become farmers and dairymen. There 
are Mrs. Durands and Mrs. Shermans only waiting their oppor- 
tunity, i 

Professor Wickson. of the University of California, says that 
the successful women farmers are superlatively so, because they 
are not so "set" in their ways as men. Men are stubborn about 
asking advice and direction. Have you ever known a man who 
would not rather stalk over a neighborhood for hall an hour than 
ask one question that, would immediately put him right. Mrs. 
Sherman upholds the university professor's theory by confessing 
that when she started in she asked advice of every raisin grower 

in the county, and by sorting and labeling and choosing from 
their advice, she worked out a successful destiny as a farmer. 

Mrs. Arthur Cornwall, of the California and the Papyrus Club, 
has decided to raise fruit and vegetables on Mondays, Wednes- 
day- and Fridays, which leaves Tuesdays, Thursdays. Saturdays 
and Sundays for club duties, art, science and religion. To that 
end, she has bought a little place in Alameda County, and when 
she cannot be found at the St. Francis Hotel nor at her clubs, she 
is watching the lettuce grow or turning over the eggs in the in- 
cubator. The symptoms look as though a real hard case of farm- 
itis might set in. II if does, 1 hope it will prove contagious, and 
that some of her club friends will catch it and try themselves out 
lor better or for worse. Mrs. Scott Durand not only served pure 
milk, but she managed her dairy so well that it earned $12,000 
in one year, and as a result id' her generosity there is another 
model free kindergarten in Chicago. There is an achievement to 
ponder over. 



A SKIN OP BEAUTY IS A JOY FOREVER 

DR. T. FELIX GOURAUD'S 

ORIENTAL CREAM 

Psmfiea OR MAGICAL BEAUTIPIER 

Remove* Tan, Pimples, Freckles. Molh-Patcn«», 
Rash and Skin Diseases, and every blemish oo 
beauty, and defies detection. It hat stood the teal 
of 60 years; no other has. and is so harmless we 
taste it to be sure it is properly made. Accept no 
counterfeit of similar name. The distinguished Dr. 
L. A. Say re said to a lady of the bant - ton (a patient) : 
"A* yon ladies will use then, 1 recommend 'Con* 
rand's Cream' as tbe least harmful of all the Skin 
preparation.." . 

For sale by all Dru agists and Fancy Coods Dealers. 

GOURAUD'S ORIENTAL TOILET POWDER 

For infanta and adults. Exquisitely perfumed. Relieves Skin Irritations, cures Sun- 
burn and renders an excellent complexion. Price 25 Cent*, by Mail. 

GOURAUD'S POUDRE SUBTILE 

Removes Superfluous Hair. Price $1.00, by mail 

FERD. T. HOPKINS. Prop'r. il Great Jones St.. New York C.iy. 





CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



Incomparably belter than any other io its clasa. 
A Little Lower Priced Than the Others. 

Benj. Curtaz & Son 

113-117 Kearny Street near Post 



January 15. 1910 



and California Advertiser 



17 




.1 \I'A\ AND TITi; 

United States. 



Though not officially, but the equiva- 
lent of an official rejection, Japan 
declines to agree to the suggestion 
of the United States to neutralize 
ili<- railways of Manchuria. Undoubtedly this is a sore disap- 
pointment to tin' Taft administration, the more so because it is 
the worst slam in the 1'aee of our "open door" policy in the Par 
East has had, and should convince our State Department that 
japan considers Manchurian trade and commerce her own, and 
that if outsiders are admitted it will be by courtesy and not by 
any right to demand a division. How Ear or to what extent the 
action of Japan may complicate our relations with Eastern Asia 
would be hard to tell just now, but our Government must face 
tin' fact that the open door policy for which both the Rooseveli 
and Taft administrations stood for without reserve or a loop- 
hole to retreat through. Japan's promise four years ago to place 
tlic commerce of the United States on a footing with her own in 
Manchuria turns out to have been merely diplomatic cunning 
to gain time in which to circumvent Korea and complete the An- 
tung-Moukden railway. Both of those schemes have been ac- 
complished, and by their accomplishment Japan becomes the 
supreme commercial power in Southern Manchuria. But that is 
not all. Count Okuma, one of Japan's greatest statesmen, says 
that inasmuch, as the Government of Japan has been flooding 
Northern Manchuria with her overplus of tillers of the soil and 
small merchants, it would be impossible to have their future 
weakened or disturbed by foreign competition in any of the re- 
gion of country to which their Fatherland has sent them to per- 
manently establish themselves. Thus, while Japan does not offi- 
cially close the Manchurian commercial door in our face, she 
has adopted a policy that must result in that, unless we send 
Dreadnaughts to shoot all closed doors off their hinges. So far 
as known, England is the only nation that lias come out openly 
in favor of our Government's scheme to neutralize the railways 
of Manchuria, but the London Government endorses the principle 
only. No intimation is given that force should he resorted to. 
.Russia was a fortnight ago inclined to join with the United 
States, but since then, Japanese movements convinces her that 
she needs to turn her attention to preparations to defend lei ow □ 
interests in Siberia, especially along the rich lowlands ••( I he 
Amur River and in the Harbin region, as well as in the coun- 
try tributary to Vladivostok against Japanese aggression. Some 
of Russia's preparations may be seen in the concentration of an 

army in Siberia near the Northeastern border of Manchuria. In 
this diplomatic victory which Japan has won over the I 

stales there is cause for war. Manchuria is natural]; the greatest 
held the Pacific Coast could find In all Asia for commercial ex- 
pansion, and if \ve an to meet with closed J IS, the nation's 

friendship for Japan in receni years, especially at the Ports- 
mouth conference, and in our betrayal of Korea into tin 
of the Mikado, we shall have reason to regret our "previous 
Meanwhile, as b purely prudential policy, lei as make Pearl 
Harbor a wondorfulU large and strong naval station. 



Mexican Special Ambassadoi I 
Mexico's Tebaohbrt, has left Washington for hi- own 
country, having failed to persuade 
tary of State Knox to permit his Government to assume the 
responsibility of restoring order in Nicaragua. He did n 
however, in concealing a deep-laid plot of Mexico to _' t 

bold in Central America with the view of ultimately 

the Isthmian States. The proposition was an insult 

United States, and has already resulted in rather strain 

tions between the two Governments, although there are no surface 

indications of anything of the kind. It is no secret that this 

Government was greatly in Hon in tin 

Zelaya a warship to aid him to escape from the wrath of the 

United States, and foi subsequei . entering 

with the bloodthirsty reti_ ng about a union 

Central An - nrst install 

United States in an\ plans the Waahingti 

■ extend its jurisdiction over the whole of Central America. 



and in the second instance to annex Zelaya's "Union" to Mexico, 
which would not be so difficult a thing to do under the scheme 
which was to submit the question of annexation to the people, 
which, under Zelaya's brutal methods, would mean death to 
negative voters. Secretary Knox was quick to see that Mexico 
had in mind to 'extend her territory to and beyond the Panama. 
Canal zone, which would give her theoretically control of that 
great enterprise because of her close proximity to it, and control 
of the sea coast line on both sides of Central America. Creel 
was treated courteously, but he found he had made a serious mis- 
take for his country in intimating such a hostile proposition. But 
it will serve to keep the United States in a state of suspicion and 
watchfulness, both as to Mexico and the Central American poli- 
ticians. 



Latham's aeroplane flight of 3,500 
Of General Interest. feet straight up into the clouds has 
put fresh vigor into the French 
craze for airships for war purposes, and the Government will 
divide appropriations for war between submarine boats and air- 
ships, having unbounded faith, with the air full of cannon and 
the under waves of the ocean full of explosives, in her ability to 
go where she likes and do about as she pleases. 

The new draft of Russia for duty in the army brings 1110,000 
new recruits to the colors, but the total number subject to the 
new draft is nearly a million and a quarter of young men. The 
drill grounds are to be located in Siberia, near the Manchurian 
border. 

To-day, sixty constituencies will hold elections in England on 
the budget question, and the Commons expect to win a large 
majority of them. 

Although a little over 80 years of age, Frances Joseph is at 
his desk by four in the morning, and sticks to it until sun-down. 

It becomes more evident every day thai China and Russia are 
arranging for a joint agreement that will bode no good Eor Japan. 

Because of her possessions. British Honduras, England is 
keeping both eyes wide open on the United States-Mexico-Cen- 
tral American tangle. 



What You Know 

Is worth much. What you don't know and can learn by 
attending "The Business University of California" will be worth 
infinitely more. 

More calls for our graduates than we can supply, because 
they are THOROUGH. Some finish the shorthand in five months: 
many finish the bookkeeping in the same time— few ever take 
longer than six mastering either. 

BERKELEY BUSINESS COLLEGE 



Z. P. SMITH. President 



2161 Shattuck. cor. Center 



"The school that's getting the scholars" 



RABJOHN & MORCOM 

Paintings, Engravings. Picture Framing and Artists' Supplies 
Free Art Gallery 

240 POST ST. (near Grant Ave.1 408 FOURTEENTH ST. (near Broadway) 
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 



R. Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 




Phooe DoofUi 1833 



SI LICK PI ACS. off Sutter. 



aesrar «a4 Moitfostcn 



A. W. Best 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Classes 
Day and Night 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR. NOSE AND THROAT 



Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M. 
and by appointment 



Oalen Bldg.. 391 Suttsr Street 
San Francisco 



Phone Douglas 4138 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 




The News Letter sees no bugaboo in 
What's in a Name? the name "subsidy." It is a good 

name and it says exactly what it 
means. Some of our good friends object to our asking for a ship 
subsidy. We do nul believe in the idea of a subsidy, but we have 
said so before and we repeat it: if every other nation that amounts 
to anything on the sea has attained its position by a subsidy sys- 
tem or by subvention, or by simply paying a bonus for carrying 
the mails, then let-ns indulge ourselves the pleasure of the game. 
No one can afford to stay in it with us once we get started. 

One of our friends is out in a circular in which he says: "We 
do not call it a subsidy to pay the railroads for carrying the mails 
from New York to San Francisco, or from New York to Chi- 
cago. We do not call it a subsidy to pay an expressman to carry 
a trunk to a depot, or a steamship to carry freight from one depot 
to another, and we do not and should not call it a subsidy when 
we pay a mail carrier to carry the United States mail." 

The good friend is evidently of the belief that the word "sub- 
sidy" will frighten a great many people, and that because of this 
frightening some of our national law-makers may be driven to 
opposition to pending measures. The News Letter might go in 
an interminable discussion to prove that the money paid to rail- 
roads to carry ilic mails i;, in verity, a subsidy, no matter 
whether it is called such or not, while the money paid to an ex- 
pressman to carry a trunk to a depot is not a subsidy. To pay a 
mail carrier for carrying the mail (an individual) is not a sub- 
sidy. To pay a railroad for carrying the mails is a subsidy. It is 
certainly not a subsidy to pay a steamship to carry freight from 
one point to another. It i- certainly a subsidy to pay a steamship 
company for carrying the mails from one point to another. Our 
friends of the Merchant Marine League seem to be afraid of .i 
word. They are afraid of the effeel this word may have on the 
voter. 



earner is liable to have a check. This is the only cloud which 
now dims the rising sun of prosperity. Any farther rise in the 
price of necessities is sure to bring about political revolutions, 
and any demand in concert by the great labor bodies will surely 
be met with a further rise and further dissatisfaction. Already 
there is an alignment in Congress to take advantage of the situa- 
tion, and the cry is being heard for a return from Elba ! That 
cry is sure to take on more tangible shape unless the destinies 
of the Republic are handled by a master man. Indications point 
to prosperity, but — 



It is now proposed to make no effort 
The Present Program, lo secure from Congress any great 

help toward the formation of a mer- 
chant marine, hut an energetic effort will be made to have au- 
thority granted the Postmaster General to advertise for tenders 
to carry American mails across the ocean, to South America, Aus- 
tralasia, the Orient, and to such localities as we only reach now 
by circuitous routes, in some cases going double the shortest il^- 
lance before being delivered, and to pay therefor the lowest sum 
of money possible in the same way as we are now paying certain 
lines to the West Indies. Cub; 1 , and Central America. This is 
what the Merchant Marine League stands for! The News Letter 
stands for much more than this, and il asks lor a SUBSIDY, and 
it uses the word advisedly — and with a true appreciation of the 
meaning of the word. A real system of subsidies, bonuses and 
subventions would mean a quick rehabilitation of America's mer- 
chant marine, and the open discussion id' the question would 
mean the quick appropriation of the needed treasure. 



Definition of 
a Bugaboo. 



In a good old dictionary which I 
have at my elbow, I find this defini- 
tion of a subsidy which I commend 
to the gentleman who has the holy 
horrors and the creeps when I use the word — "money paid by 
Government to aid a private enterprise of advantage to the 
Slate." That is clear. The man in charge of this column of 
the News Letter hates to be thought a fool, and he hopes that 
the appreciation of bis wits will not be held so cheaply as to 
suggest the necessity of an explanation to why the word "sub- 
sidy" is shied at and spoken only in whispers. And why the 
subsidizing of only a certain few mail carrying lines is suggested. 
As Mrs. Malaprop would say: "The reasons is oblivious!" 



Indications of 
Prosperity. 



The year 1910 will probably show 
The Year 1910. some readjustment and the tendency 

to demand more than is just on the 
part of the big industrial barons and on the part of the wage- 



There was an interpellation in Con- 
gress recently by one of the insur- 
gent members, and the subject of 
his plaint was the increased cost of 
living. Another one of the insurgents was vociferous in a cry 
that hard times was upon us, and he made mention of the fact 
that signs of a crisis were apparent in (be West. The reports of 
business for last month of 1909 in California will not bear wit- 
ness in favor of the calamity howlers unless it be true that figures 
lie. In every direction there is a prosperous and upward trend 
along industrial and financial lines. The bank deposits have in- 
creased more than $30,000,000 in the past six months, while the 
resources have increased more than $60,000,000. The deposits 
of the savings banks, more than $300,000,000, are more than 
half the deposits in all the banks. Along industrial lines it is 
too early to give figures as to the output, but enough is known 
to enable us to say confidently that the output has been materially 
increased. 



When it is taken into consideration 
A National Survey. that the tariff tinkering and the 

memory of the financial panic of 
1907 did not tend toward business optimism, and that rightly or 
wrongly many of the restraints of law are regarded in corpora- 
tion circles as aiming directly at the captains of industry with a 
view to crippling the big concerns, the year 1909 was remarkable 
in the extreme. The year was, in view of these facts, phenome- 
nally successful in the sense of large flotations and general busi- 
ness, and was not fraught with any extraordinary or quick ad- 
vances and recklessness. The volume of business transacted was 
large, larger by far than that of the preceding year, and the fact 
is taken as an evidence that the panic of 1907. extending as it 
did into 1908-9 was purely a mone\ panic. 

Of course, the steady increase in the price of all such articles 
as are subject, to daily consumption has worked hardship, and 
it is usually forgotten that some one benefits in the raise. The 
wage scale has not, except in the professional class, suffered any 
change, and the tendency is ever upward. 



The Standard Oil Company is con- 
Standard Oil Growing, templating the enlarging of its 

plant at Point Richmond, and when 
the contemplated improvements are completed, there will be an 
increased output of the refined product by 100 per cent. The 

Private Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member s Chicago Board of Trade 

(. Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Offloe 

Mills Bide. 

Tal. Ktlrny 482 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Ansralaa 



Branch Office: Palace Hotel 



JANUARY INVESTMENTS 

6 per cent 1910 send for 



Before converting your S. P. of ARIZ, 
our list of 

BOND OFFERINGS 



412 Montgomery Street 



SUTRO & CO., 



San Francisco 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address, 812-814 
Clau» Spreckela Bids:. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyrights, Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 






January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



19 



company, in view of the contemplated improvements, has pur? 
ehased thirty acres adjoining its plant. The purchased site is 
partly low marsh ground, and will l»' filled iii and made level. 
The present machine shops will be removed (o make room For 

new stills, and the work has already begun. 



Toll Roads California are the toll mads, and the 

Goon Roads. movement inaugurated by Nevada 

County people to abolish toll roads 
is ill-advised. If the county and public roads were of uniform 
good quality as the toll roads there might be some sense in the 
movement for abolition of the toll highways, but as our roads in 
no way compare favorably with the toll roads, the cry for their 
elimination should not be heeded. 



The directorate of the Crocker National Rank has been 

changed from eleven to nine members, and the officers of the 
bank have all been re-elected. The change in the number of offi- 
cers was dictated by the death of Mr. George Crocker, and the 
voluntary retirement of Mr. E. B. Pond. 



Alden Anderson has retired absolutely from participation 

in the affairs of the Anglo and London-Paris National Bank, and 
his place is left vacant. This was made imperative because of 
his appointment as State Superintendent of Hanks. L. J. Au- 
bi'i't was elected to the place vacated on the directorate by Mr. 
Anderson. 



Mr. Samuel Bell MeKce, who is well and favorably known 

throughout the local financial world, has been elected a member 
of the Board of Directors of the San Francisco National Hank. 
This election was made imperative through the death of Mr. 
M. 1). Morton. 



Senator George 0. Perkins has been retired from the 

directorate of the First National Rank, and is succeeded by Rolla 
V. Watt. The other officers of the bank were all re-elected. Mr. 
Watt is a valuable accession to a very efficient and active board. 



Louis P. Monteagle, who is unavoidably detained in the 

East on account of estate matters, has had In resign, because of 
this, from the directorate of the American National Bank. The 
vacancy has been filled by the election of Mr. C. If. Crocker. A 
notable act of the directors at their last meeting was tin' raising 
ol the annual dividend from 6% to 7 per cent. 



Mr. D. C. Brown has been elected to take the vacancy 

caused by the death of Mr. Alfred Lilienthal, of the Weeti rr 
National Bank. Mr. A. A. Watkins retired from office and was 
Succeeded by the election of Mr. .1. B. Pryor, dr. Mr. Allied 
L Mevei'slein was appointed second vii ^-president. 



All of the banks of San Francisco report a reasonably 

prosperous year, and a material increase m their deposits. 



Newman tic Shoeman is a name thai i< well-known in 

Boston and in many other cities. For Newman is a man who has 
made his name bv good work. The address is is Devonshire anil 
'.".' Exchange PI ICC, and is known to many who are hard to fit 
and as hard to please, and wdio in Newman tin 3 i have 

found at last the comfort in shoes the so long have sought. New- 
man is the manufacturer of the "Doctor's Approved [nst 
port," and he is celebrated as the maker of » bat is known 
'■'\,n-ii\ Shoes" for men and women. Besl of all. though, to 
the Westerner is the fact that you can have a shoe made here 
that is perfection in fit and comfort, and that from your last 
yon can order anv number of shops with a eertitu le " -imilar 
splendid sei 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Fran Merchants' 

Exchange Building, calls the attention of the public to their 
Free Labor Bureaus, located at No. 170 Turk street. San Fran- 
cisco, and 804 Broadway, Oakland. All classes of male help fur- 
nished absolutely free both to employer and employee. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and I 
streets ; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



Mardi Gras 
Excursion 



Personally conducted to the great festival city, New 
Orleans, leaves San Francisco 



January 29th, 1910 



ROUND 
TRIP 



$67.50 



Tickets good for thirty days' trip, via the famous 
ocean to gulf line. 



Sunset Route 



One hundred mile ride along the ocean shores of the 
Pacific. Through Southern California orange groves, 
the rice, cotton and sugar fields of Texas and Louisi- 
ana. Picturesque bayous, the Teche, Land of Evan- 
geline. 



Oil burning locomotives. 
No soot - No cinders. 



Through drawing-room sleepers, berths, sections, 
drawing-rooms, dining, parlor and observation car 
service. Steam heated and electric lighted through- 
out. 

Ten days' stopover at New Orleans on all first-class 
tickets reading to points East. 

Through tourist car service to New Orleans, Wash- 
ington, Cincinnati, St. Louis and Chicago. 

Write for our beautifully illustrated booklet. "Win- 
ter in New Orleans." Tells in detail of the attractions 
of the Crescent City and the wonders of the Mardi 
Gras. 



Southern Pacific 



Ticket Offices: 
FLOOD BUILDING MARKET ST. FERRY DEPOT 

THIRD AND TOWNSEND STS. DEPOT 
BROADWAY AND THIRTEENTH ST.. OAKLAND 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 



Fire Marine Automobile 

fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California 



Cash Capital, $400,000. Cash Assets, $900,000 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OP CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability, General Liability, TeamB, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobiles, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Acci- 
dents Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A Zane, Secretary; Ant, Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man, F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffltt, J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevis. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A Frank Company, General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1S50. 

Cash Capital $1,000,000 

Cash Assets 0. |i5i;. 213 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,790,360 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL, BUILDING. 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital $6,700,000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
3B0 California Street San Francisco. 

The We£ Coa& Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the Interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K. Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Oeo. E. Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 




Sign of the 
Pacific Mutual of California 



"Men of California" keep the 
premiums paid for your Acci- 
dent Insurance "in Cali- 
fornia" where the investment 
will add to your prosperity. 

The best Accident and Dis- 
ability Contracts ever issued 
in the world are being writ- 
ten by the 

Pacific Mutual of California 

Agency of F. A. STEARNS 

Manager Accident Department, 

501-502 Shreve Building 

Phone Douglas 240 San Francisco 




INSVMCE 




A I a joint special meeting of the directors of the Pacific 
Surety and of the Western Casualty and Surety Company, held 
Last Wednesday, Fred B. TJoyd was elected President, fice Wal- 
lace Everson, and the former gentleman will acl as president of 
both concerns until arrangements have been completed for the 
final merger, which will be effected as soon as the necessary ar- 
rangements can be made for the writing of additional lines by the 
Pacific Surety Company, The lines to be written will include 
employers' liability, personal accident, plate -his-, surety and 
bonding. In states where the Pacific Surety is not licensed to 
write these lines, application for permission will immediately 
he made. About four months will he required to perfect ar- 
rangements, and in the meantime the office of the Pacific Surety 
Company will be moved to the quarters al present occupied by 
the Western in order to facilitate operations. Presideni Lloyd 
announces his intention to increase the capital of the Pacific 
Surety Company to $1.111111.001) and to provide a surplus of 
$500,000. Already Lloyd, who is the live wire controlling affairs, 
lias established an industrial department, and is looking for good 
men to place in charge of this branch of the business in territory 

already decided upon. A. P. Redding continues as secretary, and 

the two hoards will also endure until final arrangements are 

completed for the absorption of the \\ oil in Casualty and Surety 

by tin- Pacific Surety ( lompany. 

* * * 

The committee from the Pacific Board, of which dames Wyper 

was chairman, that went East to confer with home-office repre- 
sentatives of companies affected by the recenl ruling of the 
Muni, -rev Conference regarding sub-general agencies, to-day 

made its report, which was quite satisfactory. 'The iitraosl good 
feeling prevails among all parties concerned, and a final satis- 
factory agreement is sure to result". The Globe and Rutgers, 
represented by Edward Brown cV Sims, has already complied with 

the ruling, as has the California Insurance Company, and rep- 
resentatives of the companies of which Bertheau & Watson are 
general agents will come to San Francisco by the middle of Feb- 
ruary to take final action in the matter. 

* * * 

The Firemans' Fund Insurance Company of California has 

bad a rattling good year, and everybody 1- happy in consequence, 
as one result will be a raise in dividends from 1" per cent to 

12 per cent: The net surplus will lie increased from the 

$1,209,639 of 1908 ( December 31sl 1. to ever $2, and the 

assets will go well over $7,000,000. The cash capital will he 
$1,500,000. 

* * * 

Applications for admission of the International Fire Insurance 
Company, of Fort Worth, Texas, to California, will not be made 
h\ General Agenl Ankele until the latter part of January. 
General Agent Cobb, for the same company, is now doing business 
in Utah, and will shortly make application for a license from 
rdaho and Nevada. No attempt will be made to do business in 
Oregon until after the Internationa] has been admitted to New 
York, owing to Oregon's deposit law. 

* * * 

The Western Slates Life Insurance Company, incorporated 
October 11th. and domiciled in the Firsl National Bank Build- 
ing, San Francisco, has been making rapid strides in the placing 
of its stock, the sale of which was not actively undertaken until 
December 1st last. Pratt & Grigsby, who are placing^the stock 
and have the general agency contract, have drawn from the 
South and Fast a force of sixty picked men with which tltc\ pro- 
pose to cover every comer of the Slate, and this force, which. 

by the way. represents an insurance writing record of something 
like twenty-five million per year, will he increased during the 
present month to at least one hundred. I luring this month the 

full number of directors have been elected. 

* * * 

The officers of the California Mutual Live Stock Company 
having failed to make satisfactory showing in its investigation 
by the California Insurance Depar id. Commissioner Wolf 



January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



21 



will this week report the. findings to the Attorney-Genera] with 

a reco lendation that the company be put out of business. The 

meeting of policyholders called by President Wright recently at 

Los Angeles failed to materialize. 

* * * 

Incited by the Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific, a 
movement is being made with strong probability for success to 
induce all unaffiliated companies doing business in San Francisco 
to become members of the San Francisco Hoard of Brokers with 
full privileges. This accomplished, il is expected that agents 
doing business in the Bay Counties will take similar action in 
the interest of harmony and correct practices. 

* * * 

.Tames Wyper, chairman of the Board Committee, which went 
Bast to whip companies into line in conformity with the ruling 
of the Monterey conference abolishing sub-genera] agencies by' 
hoard companies, has postponed the filing of his report to Friday, 
January Tth. It is understood, however, that every concession 
sought has been granted by the Eastern companies interested. 

Some alarm is fell over the altitude of the incoming Board 
of Supervisors, which stands pledged to an amendment of the 
San Francisco building law that will permit of the erection of, 
practically, frame buildings within that portion of the fire lim- 
its extending four blocks west of Powell street and within two 

blocks of Market. The buildings will have a thin outside cover- 
ing of cement or plaster, gravel roofs ami the exterior ornamen- 
tation will, probably, be of iron. 

* * * 

Karl A. Scheid will be succeeded on January 15th as manager 
of District F for the Pacific Board by 6. V. La wry, former secre- 
tary of the Vancouver Island Fire Underwriters' Association of 
British Columbia. 

The Board has granted a reduction of, approximately, fifteen 
per cent on San Francisco water-front property, extending bad 

.four blocks, since the commissioning of the two new tire boats. 

The boats throw from fifteen lines of hose, extending fifteen 
hundred feet from docks at eighty pounds pressure. 

* * * 

President Markham, of the Northwestern Mutual, who has 
been spending the holidays with his brother, ex-Governor Mark- 
bam, of California, at Pasadena, leaves for home (his week. 

1). C. Collier & Co. were to-day appointed San DiegO, Cal., 
agents of the Standard Accident, under Manager BriggS. 

W. M. Robinson, formerly with Clayton & Co., as cashier, has 
gone with Manager Cobb, of the Dixie Fire, in the same capacity. 

Macdonald & Miles have engaged offices in the New Zealand 

Building, now Hearing completion at :!ll California street, and 
which will be a handsome structure. 

* » * 

Prank I!. Bass has been sent from New York to audit the 
business of the Pacific Coast department of the New Amsterdam 
Casualty, succeeding \V. J. Randall. Mr. Bass will remain on 
the Coast permanently, and have general charge of the depart- 
ment business. 

* * * 

George J. Denell, of New York, succeeds A. G. Hann as the 
actuarj of the Colorado Insurance Department lie is a gentle- 
man of long experience along life insurance lines, and was for 
twenty-five years in the actuarial department of the Washing 
Life I osurance Company. 

* * * 

Commissioner of Imuran in, of Colorado, warns the 

public against insuring in the Conductors' [ndemnit; 
of Kansas City, which has been operating in Colorado without 
authority of law. The Railway Conductors" Protective Associnr 
tion is placed in the same category. 

E. Myron Wolf, foreighl years insurance commissio 
Stale of California, last Tuesday banded his resignation to the 

pernor, in order to accept the office of firs! vice-pres 
the Pacini Security Company, with which tl 
and Surety Company was recently merged, and of whil 
Llo lent. Mr. Wolf will not leave the com: 

office until everything is in satisfactory 
and may remain until the expiration of his appointive term. 

ril. The selection of Mr. Wolf is rej 
for the company. 



T. II. Williams, special agent for the Tyson agency and 
His Highness Superior of the flock, last Tuesday organized and 
installed the San Francisco Pond of the Royal and Ancient Or- 
der of the Blue (loose, with twenty charter members. The new 
pond will have one hundred members before the close of the 
week. The officers elected are: Russell W. ( (shorn. Most Loyal 
(lander; Frank P. Wilson, Supervisor of the Flock; Robert \V. 
Yea I, YVielder of the (loose Quil; J. L. Fuller, Keeper of the 
Golden Goose Egg; Win. N. Drennan, Custodian of the Goslins; 

F. B. Kellam, Guardian of the Pond. 

* * * 

The Pacific Coast Casualty Company has (dosed another year 
of most successful operation. This company is now close to the 
one million dollar mark, which puts it on a par with the largest 
companies operating in the field of casualty insurance. The rec- 
ord of the Pacific Coast Casually Company since its incorpora- 
tion has been a demonstration of the wisdom of conservative and 
economical organization and management. It stands to-day in 
an enviable position both as to financial strength and business 
record. It should be a matter of congratulation to the Slate that 
institutions of this character can he developed eiputl to those in 
the larger and older financial centers of the Fast. 



Bill Elephant — Who won the race? .Tack Ape — Zebra. 

Bill Elephant — I thought Crocodile was going to he first, .lack 
Ape — He was, in reality, but he didn't break the tape first. You 
see, he was running with bis mouth open. 




ROASTS 



No other seasoning can equal 

that delicate touch given all 

roasts by adding 

LEA & PERRINS 

SAUCE 

THE ORIGINAL WOftCGSTCRSHlttC 

It brings out the best flavor 
of Soups, Fish, Steals, Veal, 
Stews, Chops and Salads. 
"It is a perfect seasoning." 

Beware of Imitations. 

John Duncan's Sons, Agents, New York. 



VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

ia the 

Musical Instrument For Everybody 

Victors - $10to$60 Victrolas - $125to$200 

Easy Terms 

Sherman Hay & Go, 

Sinawir aad Other Piaaos. 
laaa of Al Grade. Victor Ta 

BUM! AND SITTER STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO 
FOIRTEENTH \NT> CI AY STREETS. OAKLAND 



22 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 




mowm 



e ^^v&^j^w i k 



129 



AMERICAN MOTORISTS IN EUROPE. 

In the days when Mark Twain wrote "Innocents Abroad," th<j 
proper way to visit the historical places of Burone was anj old 
way vui could reach them. Now the way to see Europe to the 
best advantage is via motor car. The good highways and beauti- 
ful scenery of Prance and other European countries have at- 
tracted many tourists who love motor touring for its own sake, 
while the advantages of a motor car fqr traveling rapidly, com- 

Eortably and independently of railway trains, have rec nun i id 

it to tourists who wish to visil both the usual ami unusual points 
of inten ■! on the t lontinent 

The various automobile and i 'ing organizations have made 

touring abroad more attractive than it was in 11 arly days or 

motoring by having simplified Ihe formalities of customs, pass- 
ports, routes; etcetera. Several of Ihe national and international 
organizations now supply triptychs and all necessary inform 
and [>apers in such form thai an American can tour abroad prac- 
tically without bother. Also, the express companies co-operate 
to take the burden of shipping cars off the bands of the owner. 
Commenting on the groat number of Americans who tour Europe 
in motor cars, the Paris edition of the New York Herald says : 

"There are so many doorways into France that it is practically 
impossible to determine accurately (be number of automobilists 
who annually pass through for the purpose of touring over Re- 
publican highways. Such figures as are available, however, show 
that the touring season, just closed, brought a larger numher "f 
automobile visitors from America and England than an< 
ceding year. 

"It is not always realized what a valuable asset the American 
and English automobilist is to France. The average automobilisl 
remains one month. The American rarclv stops less than six- 
weeks, while the Englishman is satisfied to "run over" for a 
much shorter period. The minimum expenditure of a party of 
touring automobilists is 50 fr. a day for each person, this sum 
representing hotel accommodations, food, upkeep of the automo- 
bile and incidentals, but ignoring amounts spent on works of 
art, presents and other items. hi view of such a train of gold, 
the proposal of the French Government to impose a tax on 
visiting automobilists appears to be unsound policy. 

"A feature of the development of foreign touring is the lum- 
ber of Americans who now visil Europe in American automobiles. 
Everything has been made so simple by the various touring asso-» 
cialions thai the American automobilisl plans tor a lour through 
Europe with as little fear of difficulties as if he were aboul la 
make a run through the Berkshires. 

"The exteni of this movement is shown by the facl thai three 
leading Eactories have opened Paris touring bureaux in the last 
two years. Mr. H. D. Wilson, the head of the Packard Motor 



Car Company's Paris office, says that from January 1st to Sep- 
tember 30th he was in touch with more than two hundred Pack- 
ard touring parties, and expected to have a total of two hundred 
and fifty at the end of the year. "The actual number is doubtless 
greater than this." explained Mr. Wilson, "for although I am sup- 
posed to be advised of all Packard machines coming to Europe, 
many owners slip away without giving us any intimation of their 

presence." 

* * * 

Thai the little midget Hupmobile, one of (he smallest four- 
cylinder car- made, and which is attracting a great deal of at- 
tention in tbc West, is more than merely a "scmil about town 7 ' 
machine, has been demonstrated by a trip from San Francisco 
in Los Angeles. 

It has remained lor Robert T. Brown, of this city, to show 
what a little Hupmobile can do. Brown, accompanied by Charles 
II. Ilanke, drove his little "Hup"' from San Francisco to Los 
Angeles last week without a single breakdown, and with only 



AUTOMOBILE 
PAINTING 

QUALITY 
PRICE 



We combine to a remarkable degree all the quali- 
ties of perfedt automobile painting, the chief points 
of which are as follows: — 



1. Elegance and originality of design 

2. Scientific preparation 

3. 'Workmanship and material 

4. Importance of detail 

5. Artistic finish 

6. Promptness 

7. Price 



We confidently invite all autoists intending to have 
their cars painted to inspect our works. 



Morris Auto Painting Co. 



500 Van Ness Ave. cor. McAllister St. 



San Francisco, Cal. 




$850 



Full of Snap, Fire, 
Vim and Style 



Just a relative difference between the larger cars and the Hupmobile; that is, the difference in size— not in 
quality. 

BEAR IN MIND THE THE PRICE— THEN STUDY THESE SPECIFICATIONS:— 

SPECIFICATIONS: 
ENG1NE-4 cyl.. 20 H. P.. 3 1-4 in. bore, 3 3-8 in. Stroke; L-head 

type; water cooled; offset crank-Bhaft. 
TRANSMISSION-Seledtive sliding gears. 
CLUTCH— Multiple disc type: self-adjusting. 



REAR AXLE— Shaft drive; Hyat. roller and New Departure 

bearings. 
BRAKES— Two foot and two emergency (internal expanding) on 

rear hubs. 



IGNITION— Bosch high tension magneto. 

TIRES— 30x3 inches. 

WHEEL BASE— 86 inches. 

TREAD— 56 inches. 

SPRINGS— Semi-elliptical front. 

EQUIPMENT— Two side and tail oil lamps, dragon horn, tools. 

repair kit. pump. 

WEIGHT— 1 100 pounds, regular equipment. 



Telephone Park 6475 



S. G. CHAPMAN 



824 Van Ness Ave. 



JANUARY 15, miO 



and California Advertiser 



83 



>- rf 



s. II. M • 6 ' 
Alfred I! ' neri- 

tlwn. 

D. J. Post, Shmc Commit 



two punctures. The handsome little car 
made good on every mile of the road that 
would have taxed a more powerful road- 
ster or touring car. 

Brown and Hanke made no attempt to 
break the time record between the two 
cities, but just to see what the' little midget 
could do without straining it, made the 
run from Cold Spring to Los Angeles, a 
distance of 160 miles, on the last day of 
the tour, starting at 10 :30 in the morn- 
ing and arriving shortly after dark. 

* * * 

The Oakland Show. 

In Piedmont Pavilion will be held the 
-Oakland Automobile Show, beginning on 
January 17th, and continuing to the 23d. 
This is to be a magnificent display of the 
modern vehicle and will be under the 
management and promotion of George P. 
Detriek, maker of exhibition publicity for 
automobiles. Fifty-five different makes of 
machines are to be exhibited in the Pavil- 
ion. The management announces that 
thirty-one cars not seen in the San Fran- 
cisco show, under the same management, 
will be shown in Oakland. In preparing 
for the show at Piedmont Pavilion, the 
management has found that the new-born 
spirit of "pull together" holds good as 
regards the dealers who are located in Oak- 
land, in just the same enthusiastic way as 
it does with merchants in all lines. 

* * » 

California State Auto Association Map. 

The highways map of the Association 
is announced as complete. This map cov- 
ers the States of California and Nevada, 
and has been sent as a compliment to all 
members of the association. The original 
idea governing the issue of the map was 
that the issue should he limited to mem- 
bers, and while the price is placed at $2, 
there are none to be had on any of the 
news-stands, and it may be that it will 
never be put on general sale, but copies 
may be had on payment of $2, and by ap- 
plication through memhers. 

The highway information has been com- 
piled from the most reliable available 
sources, and it may be assumed is correct, 
and in addition to this, the map has been 
submitted to the official surveyors of the 
several counties, and these have passed up- 
on it as correct to the extent of their 
knowledge. Of course, there are many of 
the roads of California that are not to be 
found on this map, and it is impossible to 
show all of these on a map of pocket size, 
yet it mav be depended on as to the accu- 
racy of the highways shown, those of gen- 
oral importance and these are all shown. 

* * * 

The cuts printed on this page represent 
a few of the noted men in the automobile 
industry who hnve been the moving spir- 
its in the Palace Automobile show at 
Madison Square Gardens, New York. 
They are members of the American 
Car Manufacturers' Association. This is 
the tenth annual exhibit of the Dealers' 
iation. In point of numbers, in at- 
tendance and as to the displays mad' 
the most successful ever held in the United 
> More than thirty thousand dollars 
were spent in decorations alone. In an- 
other column. Mr. W". L. Hughson writes 
of the cars exhibited and of the features 
of the show. 



/.'. R. 
Salon. 






Mr. 1- littee. 

R. E. Olds, Sh- 



u 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 



Power Measured in INCHES 



ENERGY is generally measured in 
horsepower. 

Horsepower means quantity. 

* * * * 

Let's measure energy in inches — 
which means distance. 

A motor, let us say. has a 5 inch 
stroke. 

Power (energy) is produced in each 
cylinder on only four-fifths of the 
stroke — a distance of I inches. 

* * * * 

The piston in each cylinder travels 
down and hji twice on each cycle, or 
( !\."i) 30 inches. 

* * * * 

In a one-cylinder motor, therefore, 
the engine produces -I inches of power 
in 20, leaving on each cycle 16 powerless 
inches. 

$ 4s ♦ ♦ 

In a four-cylinder motor, the engine 
produces (4x4) 16 inches of power in 
20, leaving on each cycle four power- 
less inches. 

* * * * 

In a six-cylinder motor, the engine 
produces (6x4) 24 inches of power in 
2Q, giving lour inches more power than 
the distance of the cycle 

Thus the four-cylinder motor has 
not enough power to equal the distance 

of the cycle. 

'This shortage means intervals of no 
power. 

* * * * 

The Six has more than enough 
power to equal tHv distance of the cycle. 
This surplus of power makes it impos- 
sible tor the Six to lack power. Hence, 
the Six (and only the Six) has con- 
tinuous power. 

* * * * 

Every motor (while running) is 
either making or using up power. If 




this were not so we would have Perpet- 
ual Motion right now. 

* * * * 

Every one. two and four-cylinder 
motor uses up its own power to drive it- 
self through those inches in which it is 
not making power. 

* * * * 

What would you have your motor do: 
waste power in driving itself or use 
every ounce of its power in driving the 
car? 

Foolish question ? Not at all. 

II your motor could talk, it would 
tell you that it can't drive its car as 
well when it has to drive itself also, as 
it could if it had only to drive the car. 

* * * * 

That's where the Six has the big ad- 
\ antage oi er all motors ha\ ing less than 
six cylinders. 

For the Six ha- continuous power. 

It is always ilrivimj the Car and Ai vei 

wasting power in driving itself. 

* # * * 

And the result is shown in Six super- 
iority in 
Sweet, running. 

Absence of noise and vibral ion. 
Flexibility. 

Hill climbing capacity. 
Economy of operation and upkeep. 



These points of advantage are clearly 
shown in actual practice. Sooner or 
later, you'll ride in a Six. and then 
you'll wonder how in the world you 
ever made yourself believe that four of 
yours; was ;i satisfactory car. 

* * * * 
We live and learn. 

Present owners of Sixes have already 
learned, and you will not lind one id' 
them who would entertain for a minute 
the idea of buying a (our for high- 
grade service. 

* * * * 

These six owners are men who know 
the difference between fours and Sixes. 
They have owned both kinds. 

* * * * 

If you do not know for yourself 

(from personal experience) how won- 
derful this difference is. we invite you 
to fide in the Winton six. 

Do that, and the Six will sell itself 
lo you. 

You'll have no trouble whatever in 
deciding that "this is the. lies! car 1 

ever saw-" 

Let us show you the I !( 1 <> Winlou 

Sis at our branch house. ::iai Van Ness 
Avenue, or ::l vour home or office. 
Telephone \hnirl /';;.'. 



MOTOR 
I CYL. 

2CYL. 

4 CYL. 

6 CYL. 



REPRESENTS POWER 



oooooooo REPRESENTS NO POWER 
DIA6RAM REPRESENTS ONE CYCLE OF 20 INCH PISTON TRAVEL. 



■ ooooooooooooooooo&oooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo 

POOOODOOCOOOOOOOOOOOO|BBBI^B 



■oooooooooooooooooooooo 



The 

Winton Motor Carriage 

Co. 

300 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



35 




WORLDS RECORD. 



POPE HARTFORD- WINNING 
PORTOLA ROAD RACES- OCT.53,09. 
258 MILCS IN M9 MINUTES- - 



Fourteen out of fifteen automobiles in the Portola road races 
used Monogram oils. Does this mean anything to you? Moore 
Motor Supply Co., Los Angeles, San Francisco and Oahland. 



Ivan L. de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



Golden Gate Ave. and Van Ness, San Francisco 



Sometime, somewhere, someone MAY 
make an automobile the equal of the 

Buick 



But never will any-one, any-where, any- 
time produce a better one. 

The BUICK holds more worlds records than 

any other car on earth, regardless of price 

Consider BUICK Quality, then look at BUICK 

price. 



Buick "While Streak" - $1150 

Bulck-30 .... 1550 

Bulck-40 .... 1900 

Bulck-50 7 passenger - 2900 
AU F. O. B. S. F. 

Get immediate deliveries now while you can. 



Howard Automobile Co. 



Pacific Coast Distributors 

523-533 Golden Gate Ave. 



Phones: Market 1536 
Home J 2313 



The Winter's 

JLW 

<*Ca^aW 
'ISaaaaV 


Sensation 

■ ^ 


'l!^LaaV 

^aV V / 
' vLaaaaavv. / 

This Morgan & Wright Tire 


WILL NOT 


SKID 


Wein&ock, Nichols Co. 

! 569 GOLDEN GATE AVE. SAN FRANCISCO 



BRIGHTEN UP FOR THE 
HOLIDAYS :: :: 



•• •• 



If you are particular about 
the appearance of your 
car at this time of the year, 
—and you should be— see 
us about painting it. Our 
ideas and suggestions in 
painting an automobile are 
vastly different from those 
of others. 



:: Elite Auto Company :: 

AL MORRIS 677 Golden Gate Ave. 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



•Tandahy 15, 1910 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros.. 246 "W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dam* 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. Road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE— San Jose Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgrs. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Buick and O'ds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Missi<m Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE — Lamolle Grill. 36-38 North First street The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROT, CAL. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVILLE. — J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

HEALD.SBURG— HOTEL SOTOTOME, J. McDonough, Prop. Only first 
class hotel in the city. Electricity throughout. Free sample rooms. Hot 
and cold water in every room. Baths with suites. Special attention to 
auto parties. Phone Main 60. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobll* Engineer*, Machinist* and Blacksmiths. 
27$ Valencia Street, San Franclaco. Telephone Market 1986 



THORPE'S 

ILLUSTRATED 

ROAD MAP 6 TOUR BOOK 

The only Map which shows actual 
PHOTOS of fbrksTurnss Cross Roads 

Pirn. «v TKOP-PE ENGRAVING CO LA 



PACIFIC 

MOTOR SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

Oakland, Calif. 
Northern Distributors 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
545 Van Ness Ave. Phone Market 5878. 



Vulcanizing 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market M70. 



42 Van Neaa Avenue. 



San Franclaco, Cal. 



Phone Park 6544 



I_. J. Carl. Manager 



Auto Top Manufacturing Co. 

Automobile and Carriage Trimmings 
491 Golden Gate Avenue 



San Francisco, Cal. 



Near Polk 



TENTH ANNUAL SHOW A BIG SUCCESS. 
By W. L. Hugh son. 

New York, December 31, 1909. — The tenth animal interna- 
tional automobile show of the American Motor Car Manufac- 
turers' Association, opened here this afternoon with a grand 
flourish, ami In a Westerner's eyes, il seemed like an immense 
affair. The Grand Central Palace in which il is being held was 
crowded to overflowing, and the building was handsomely deco- 
rated with plants and mural decorations thai were artistically 
arranged. Of the three hundred-odd exhibitors, quite a large 
number had big displays of many types of ears ami special bodies. 
As one entered the Palace and ascended the marble stairway, the 
Large exhibits of the Premier, finish, lien and Ford, occupying 
the very center of the Moor, beneath the brightly illuminated 
trellis which decorated the reef, were most impressive, and of 
these, the display of Ford cars draped with ivd ribbons was, in 
my estimation the mosl attractive of the entire shew. In the 

latter booth there were mosl hand- models of town ear. 

coupe, runabout, tourabout and touring ear, all of which have 
been seen on this coast. 

The change in bodies this season is quite noticeable, the new 
"Gunboat" type, with its tonneau curving inward instead of 
outward, which several ears have as a 1910 feature, is attracting 
the attention of many. Otherwise there -.'ems to he no radical 
change in chassis, and the ears look pretty much the same. 

Of the foreign car exhibitor-, il ■ thai attracted the great- 
est attention by far was the Fiat display, in this booth was the 
famous 190 b. p. Fiat car, with which Lewis Strang made a mile 
in 37 seconds and a quarter mile in H seconds, at Atlanta, (la., 
and Indianapolis, fnd. The ear is an immense machine painted 
red, and most formidable looking. Crowds gathered around it 
continuously, bo thai i\ was difficult to get a glimpse of it. 

Among the accessory dealers and manufacturers, a number of 
novelties wen' shown, the two galleries being devoted principally 
to this line of gootls. Tires were displaced in profusion, the 
Ajax-Grieb Rubber Company making tires right at their booth, 
showing the actual work of building tires from the cone up, 
which was quite interesting! 

One of the mosl decidedly novel features shown was the Jones 
Live Map, by the United Manufacturers, a device in the form of 
a circular index card revolving on a pivot and connected with the 
car's front wheel so that it moves as distance is com red; and an 
index arrow points to wording on the" card which gives the mile- 
age and the exact location of the ear at any moment. Full direc- 
tions are printed on the revolving disc, as to the proper direction 
to follow at turns and forks in the road. Many other unique 
things that will suit Californians when placed on the Western 
market were shown. 

In short, the display was a big affair, and worth going 3,000 
miles to see. At preseni the automobile market in the East is 
extremely brisk, and the people an' taking greatest interest it 

things connected with the motor ear. 

* * * 

New Agency in Oakland. 

B. C Collin-, manager of the f'arterear Automobile Company. 

reports that he has placed the agency of tlic Cartercar, in Oak- 
land, with C. II. Davis, a well-known automobile man of Ala- 
meda County. Davis, who contracted for twenty of the new 
friction tire machines 'is going to establish headquarters on 



RENAULT "The Car" Guranteed For Life 




NEW PRICES FOR 1910 





Closed Cars 


Touring or Runabouts 




complete 


complete 


Voiturette 




11750 


9 H. P. 


(3000 


2500 


10 H. P. 4 cyl. 


3500 


3000 


12-16 H. P. 


4000 


3200 


14-20 H. P. 


5500 


4500 


18-24 H. P. 6 cyl. 


"Little Six" 6250 


5250 


2030 H. P. 4 cyl. 


6500 


5500 


25-35 H. P. 4 cyl. 


6800 


5800 


35-45 H. P. 4 cyl. 


7500 


6500 



50-60 H. P. 6 cyl. "Big Six" 
ALL CARS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 



316-322 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone, Market 7038 



January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



27 



Twelfth street, the automobile row of Oakland. He is in tem- 
porary quarters now. Besides making arrangements for repre- 
senting the Cartcrears in Alameda County, Davis is preparing to 
make an exhibit in the coming Automobile show to be held in 
Piedmont Eink. The same polished chassis which caused so 
much comment at the recent Portola show will he used in the 
Oakland exhibition. 

* * * 

New Stromberg Depots. 

The Chanslor & Lyon Motor Supply Company have just been 
appointed distributing agents for the Pacific Coast for the Strom- 
berg Carburetor parts, manifolds and fittings. The Chanslor & 
Lyon Motor Supply Company maintains offices at Seattle, San 
Francisco and Los Angeles. Mr. Thomas M. Hart, of the Strom- 
berg Motor Devices Company, will travel the territory continu- 
ously, giving the dealers and garage men advice and aid regard- 
ing the installation and care of the Stromberg product. The 
Stromberg agency in San Francisco has enjoyed a very prosper- 
ous year, under the management of Mr. William IJ. Johnston, but 
the transfer of its affairs over to the Chanslor & Lyon Company 
may only be looked upon as an enlargement of its sphere of use- 
fulness. The line, Mr. Johnston says, will really receive better 
and- more- extensive attention than ever before. 

* * * 

H. 0. Harrison, representatives for three lines of ears in 
California, the Peerless, Selden and Everitt, are preparing to re- 
ceive their latest addition, the Everitt "Thirty." This low- 
priced car is being ushered into the motor car world with a 
strong bid for public approval. The price, $1,300 is, of course, 
attractive. The 110 inch wheel base, the roomy tonneau. the 
racy appearance and handsome lines of the car, arc bound to 
make it as popular as the Cadillac, the Chalmers or the E. M. F. 

The men who are behind the Everitt, Messrs. Everitt and Metz- 
gers, were responsible for the phenomenal success, firsi of the 
Cadillac and later of the E. M. F. These two cars have made 
sales records throughout this country never before equaled. A( 
a. time when experts are predicting that motor ear prices in 1910 
will take unto themselves wings, the Everitt appears at the price 
which at once calls attention to the car. 

The fact that only 38 per cent of the Everiti allotment re- 
mains to be sold shows what a stride this car has al ready made 
into the motor car market. Harrison is in qn the ground floor 
with the entire Pacific Coast as territory. He expects to be able 
to secure as many cars as he needs. Already Ilia company bas 
taken a large number of advance orders, and Beores are anxiously 
awaiting the arrival of the newest and latest product of the au- 
tomobile industry. 

* * * 

Following a custom established two i, the Xeu Ram- 

bler is exclusively shown during the \e» fork shows at the 
Rambler building, Broadway and Sixty-second Btreet, New York. 

The Rambler Automobile Compan] of New York has arranged 
for the reception of Rambler dealers. Rambler owners and Ram- 
bler friends in a way which would he quite impossible at 
ace or Garden shows. 

Such conveniences will be provided for the eon. 
dealer that he will be quite sure to appreciate an opportn 
escape the crowd of curious ones who might he spectators to his 
business transactions. 

Such special arrangements have been made for the ■ imiort of 
visitors that the friends of the Rambler will make the Rambler 
building their headquarters, receive mail there, dii 
and make business appointments. 

» * * 

Through their Petaluma agency, G. W. Rodehaver, the 1! 

Automobile Company has just delivered to George 1.' 

city a seven-passenger fifty horse-power Bnick touring ear. Riley 

is an old and well-known automobile man, who for several years 
has been connected with the sales organizations of various auto- 
mobile agencies, and who is held in high regard by all « 10 know 
him as a recognised authority on automobiles. 



Most Fitting Finale 
to the Festive Feast 




LIQUEUR 



PERES CHARTREUX 



—GREEN AND YELLOW— 



At first-class Wine Merchants, Grocers, Hotels, Cafes. 

Batjer & Co., 46 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 




Be Clean — Use 

DUNTLEY 

PNEUMATIC 

CLEANERS 

"Not a Toy" 

Eledric and hand power. See our six sizes for home 
use from $.18 to $140. with full set of cleaning tools. 

S. F. Compressed Air Cleaning Co. 

Sutter and Stockton Sts.. S. F. 



Both Phones 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 430O 



Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

SucceediM A. Zetkrtxch (t Son 
Zellerbach Buildine. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streeta 



TiT 



e rm o i dining 



™3 Brake 



Hughson An d Merton 



WILL NOT BURN— LASTS INDEFINITELY 

FACTORY 544 Van New Ave. 

REPRESENTATIVES San Francisco 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 
Storage Renting Supplies Machinist 



MOTOR CAR SERVICE CO. 

J. W. PFARSON. General Manager 
Market and Van Ness 



"The fineS Motor Car 
Station in the World." 



Phone Market 1706 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Roaenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Nest and Golden Gate. Phone Franklin 1535 



Golden Gate School of 
Automobile Engineering 


Automobile 
Clearing House 




A. GILCREST 


419-425 Larkin Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 


Sen FriDcifico, Cil 


1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 


WSM 


= S. G. RAYL 


it Northern California Representative 


^■^<BSsJq3^ f*Cr 


— RHH-Rflt finlrlon date- A vrv 


San Francisco. 



Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar 

Durocar Automobile Company 



of San Francisco 



38 Van Ness Avenue 



Tire Cost is Lessened 

THE KEATON VULCANIZING WORKS 

616-618 Van Ness Avenue 

issue a new 

GUARANTEE ON RETREADS 

which should interest all owners. This guarantee is practically 
the same as that governing new tires and is molt liberal in its 
terms. It will pay you to investigate this practical form of tire 
insurance. 

The Keaton Vulcanizing Works 
616-618 Van Ness Ave. 

REMEMBER THE NAME AND THE PLACE 



All your car needs is a 

SPLITDORF MAGNETO 

to have the Bes~t Ignition in the world. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch, 520 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Thomaa B. Jeffery & Company, 117-128 Valencia St., San Franoleco 



Packard Exhibit. 

The display of the Packard Motor Car Company at the Tenth 
National Automobile Show in Madison Square Garden expresses 
the great progress which has been made by the Packard Com- 
pany in the production of enclosed bodies. The feature of the 
exhibit is a blue and gray Packard "Thirty," with limousine body. 
The Packard "Eighteen" town car is shown as a landaulet, 
painted in brown and strikingly trimmed in orange and light 
blue. 'I'll'' third car in the exhibit is a Packard "Thirty'' phaeton 
entirely in white, with Eoman gold trimmings. On account of 
In lack of space, the older types of ears with which Hie public is 
more familiar, such as the standard touring car and runabout, 
are not shown. All three of the exhibited cars are exceptional 
examples of harmonious and beautiful effects obtained by the 
careful matching of details. The trimmings of the inclosed cars 
are egpei ially imported materials. The interior of (he limousine 
is in exact keeping with the painting of the car. being done in 
dine and gray silk brocade. All of the bright metal parts are 
silver plated. 

* • * 

Exhibition of the Packard Truck. 

The exhibit of the Packard Motor Car Company, in the com- 
mercial vehicle section of the Tenth National Automobile Show, 
Madison Square Garden, New York, January 8th to 15th, con- 
sists of one of the several trucks recently built fur John Wana- 
maker. This is a good example of the progress that has been 
made to meet business requirements in body designing as well as 
in the mechanical construction of trucks. The Packard three- 
Ion truck is manufactured as a standard chassis in two lengths, to 
each of which may be fitted either a long or a short platform. 
There is an extensive line of optional bodies, and the Packard 
Company is provided with designs for a great number of special 
bodies. In addition, any other type of special body will be de- 
signed and built to order. The normal capacity of the Packard 
truck is three tons, and the maximum speed twelve miles an 
hour. The price of the standard chassis is $3,400, and the price 
i>f the complete truck' with standard body and equipment is 
$3,550. 

* * » 

Heard from Thompson. 

In a letter received by the San Francisco Branch of the Miche- 

lin Tire C pany, from their manager, Mr. I.'. V. Thompson, 

who is al the present time in New York City, be advises thai 
Lew i- Strang again demonstrated bis fearlessness al Indian- 
apolis on December l?th and 18th by breaking several records) 

and as listed lie used Micholin tires. With the weather so colli 
that lie was almost frozen, Strang drove 5 miles in :i minutes IT 

sec I-. breaking Oldlield's record of 1.11 for Ibis itistance. 

Strang established a track record for one mile in 39 seconds, 
a new record for 1 kilometer in 22 seconds, anil drove a quarter 

of a mile in S 1-5 seconds, which was at Ike phei Lenal rate of 

111 miles pel- hour. 

* * * 

( 'up Goes /" Buick. 

II mi offered by the .New Year's celebration committee for 

the largest number' of cars of any one make in the automobile 
parade, and won for the second consecutive time by the Buick 
with fifty-one cars in line, is in unusually large and beautiful 
trophy, standing twelve inches in height, and upon a base six 
inches high. This most attractive cup, which is on display at 
the salesrooms of lite Howard Automobile Company, is of bronze, 
artistically decorated with grape vines and bunches of grapes, 
and is nine inches in diameter at the top and seven and one-half 
inches at the base. 

* * * 

The Howard Automobile Co. report the sale last week of 
one of their 1910 forty horse-power roadsters to Wm. G. Van 
Zee, of Woodland, a 1910 Buick "White Streak," to the Seaside 
Auto Company of Santa Cruz; also a "White Streak" to H. O. 
Cummings of Redding, and a 40 horsepower roadster to Dr. P. 
CoUischonn of San Francisco. 

* * * 

C. E. Matbewson. Pacific Coast manager of the Diamond Rub- 
ber Company, left to-day to attend the Garden Automobile Show 
at New York. At the close of this show he will spend a few days 
at Akron, where the factory is located, in an endeavor to get 
larger shipments of the new Diamond Grip casings, as well as 
the demountable rims. 



January 15, 19 JO 



and California Advertiser 



29 




rho Fail-ender in a race is always the quickest to 



Professor of Music — What leads you to think your son 

is musical? Parenl — He's a regular crackerjack with the Jews' 
harp. 

Woggs — Do you believe that the 

— Certainly 
holler. 

Pittsburger— The distinguished visitor praised our city 

to the skies. New Yorker — Tie musi have said some very dark 
things about it. 

IT.ylv Prisoner — You're a justice of the peace, ain't you? 

Justice — T am, sir. Ugly Prisoner — Then what are you butting 
in on Ibis ease for? 

Gillis — What ever became of your boy? 

reformer. Gillis — And the girl? Willis — She 
Gillis — 1 see. A reform mess. 

Redwood Roger — YVhal did you lynch the 

Didn't be take well? Deadeye Dick — Thai's 1 1 u 



Willis — He is a 
is a suffragette. 

new doctor for? 
trouble. Most 



of them are satisfied with taking the sick. 

"P.'' "What do people mean when they say they have 

the field to pick from?" "It is the coroner's prerogative in gath- 
ering the remains after an automobile accident." 

Indignant Pedestrian (limping) — See here, yonr dog bit 

me on the knee. The Owner of the Dog — Huh ! How much 
higher do you expect a dog bis size to reach? 

"In the early days," said the Indian lecturer, "whisky pro- 
ceded the white man." "And he's been following it ever since, 
hasn't he?" queried the rough-neck in the back tow. 

Pater — Look here. Annie, that young man of yours should 

have proposed long ago. Annie — He did, father, at least he pro- 
posed that little William be absent the next time lie called. 

Doctor's Assistant — The doctor will examine you in (he 

ante-room. Mrs. Doolej Phwat docs he mane, Dinnis? Mr. 
Dooley — Whist, woman: 'lis the Lalbio name for stomick. 

Old Gentleman (to boys knocking down apples) C( 

boys; Ibis will never do. The Kid — We know it aiu'l very fast, 

and it you can suggest any better way id' doing it, well go halvera 
with you. 

First B03 (as they approach forbidden apple orchard in 

mortal fear of the big watch-dog)— Jim-Jimmie, have you Btill 
got your ner-nerve with you? Second Boy — Y-vcs. I'm -lill able 
to run ! 

The Preacher — W\i Tuesday evening Elder Jinks will 

address the Men's Club on "Hell." the Elder— You mighl add, 

l'arson. thai I would be \cr\ glad to 

gation there, too 

First Indian What's the mallei' with the chie 

Indian lie is always sad when he gets to thinking ili.it ibis is 
the last year thai we can boas! of a strictly AJl-American team in 

any line of Bport. 

Miss Blase — The women of Turkey arc throwing away 

their veils. Miss Highup — No wondei thai country never pro- 
- with such sillv women. Whv didn't they cut them down 
for bathing-suits? 

Intending Mistress And why did you leave your last 

place ? Bridget -Shore, an' the young man wxa a afther- 
Bpeaker. 1. M. — Why. what had that to '1" with it? Bri 
Shure, an' his afther-dinner spec, not to me credit 

at all. 

Mike (just over, looking up at Statui I Faith, 

an' where did they L'it thot thing? I'n Shur 
it to us. Mike— And phwat for? Pal— He, .<. - 
they had once. Mike — Gwan. The Frineh tight wnl thei 
an' this bast)- hasn't Lr"t a wan. 

"With the first of t 1 said the repentant son, "I'm 

it out with a new resolution." "If] 
murmured the father 'you turn,' 

id. father. hastened 

mat el v tl 



Severe Tests Prove Its Superiority 

Although a comparatively new product, Zerolene has 
been more severely tested under all conditions than 
many other lubricants, and, distinctly better than any of 
these, has triumphed in every test. 




Auto Lubricating Oil 

lubricated the winning Thomas car in the famous New York to 
Paris race, also the Protos and Zust cars which ran second and 
third. Zerolene proved its perfect lubricating and non-carbon- 
izing qualities, and its zero-working ability in the niost severe 
tests to which a lubricating oil has ever been put. 



Zerolene is the only "all 
round" oil that serves all 
types of cylinders and bear- 
ings. There is only one kind 
of Zerolene, produced in 
only one place in the world. 



Put up in sealed cans with 
patent spout that cannot be 
refilled. Also in barrels for 
parage trade. Sold by 
dealers everywhere. Write 
for booklet, "21,000 miles 
with Zerolene." Free. 





OO 

les With 
ROLEN E 



Addressing Machine 

FOR SALE CHEAP 

One power drive Bellknap Addressing Machine 
complete with typewriter to stencil names. 'Will 
address and cut 6OOO wrappers per hour. 

Commercial Supply Co., 75 Fourth Street 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pore Witer for Oikliid 

AISSM* 

Incorporated Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bactertologlcally purified by electrical process 6 rations 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. 11.60 per month. Single i ration 
bottle, 50 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 snd Horns A 4192. 
980 45th Street OekUiod. Csl. 



Blake, Moffitt & Towne 



PAPER 



1400 to 1450 Fourth St.. San Francisco. Telephone Market 3014 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 




PEPSIN 

GUM 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 15, 1910 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 

Phone Kearny 3872 134-136-138 Front St., San Francisco 



Yosemite Valley 

OPEN ALL WINTER 

A panorama of ethereal winter beauty, 
beyond description. 

' WINTER SPORTS-SLEIGHING-SKAT- 

i ^ iLH'jjn^Yi n^) ING-TOBOGGANING, 

MHMUHlBII " 

Join one of the Winter Excursion Parties. 

Daily train service, and the fine tourist hotel 
at the Park Line and in Yosemite, make it a 
quick, comfortable trip at any time. 

See GEO. F. MILLER, Genl. Agt., 884 and 673 Market St, S. F. 




MAYERLES GERMAN EYEWATER IS 

a simple and perfectly harmless Eye Remedy, for children and 
sdult*. 

OFFICE CHIEF OF FOLtCE, San Francisco.— II given me «;rcal pltu- 
are to recoct toon d to the public Mr. George Moyerle of 060 Market St., 
' San Francisco. I hare been using glasses for the put twelve year* 
ud during that time bare consulted lereral optician*, but not until I 
had coniulted Mr. Oeorge Majerle and had him fit flatten to my eyes 
did I get entire satisfaction. Moat reipectfullj, 

J. It. ANDERSON, Sergeant of Police. 
IT IS MARVELOUS. The effect of Mayerle's Eye Water has been 
marvelous and I shall recommend Jt at the peer of all eye remedial. 
Yoan truly. P. KELLY. Alameda County Hospital, San L.andro, Cal. 

Oradnate German Expert Optician, charter member American 
Anociation of Opticians 060 Market Street, opposite Hale'i. 
Phone Franklin 3370. San Francisco MAYERLES GERMAN EYE WATER. By Mail, 15c. 




George Mayerle 



ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS 

Goodyear Rubber Co. 

R. H. PEASE. President 

587-589-591 Market Street, at Second 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arrivine and on sale. 



Cw$M aaim<al th® IS®©tadk@[r 

As I sauntered into the office, the old man, writing at the big 
mahogany desk, uneasily shifted his feet over the rich carpeting, 
but he finally did get up with a pained expression on his face 
to protrude his great, bony hand at me. 

"You're not any too glad to see me, are you?" I questioned, 
answering the gesture until my hand clasped his. 

"I can't say that I am," he replied with something of a sigh, 
"but as long as you saw fit to come in — you are welcome." 

"Thanks, you're very considerate." 1 gave my tone as much 
irony as it would stand without slopping over and took an un- 
proffered chair. 

"Some way or other, John," he unsteadily remarked, giving me 
a shrewd glance in spite of his seeming timidity. "I have never 
exactly fancied these young fellows, who come back from the city 
carrying a cane and wearing light blue clothes topped off with a 
brown, stiff hat." 

"Well, some way or other," I mocked, laying the hat in ques- 
lion mi the desk. "I have not been dictating the styles this 
year, and so feel called upon to stale in defense of myself that the 
fashions are not of my picking. However, you must admit thai 
this outfit rather becomes my particular style of beauty," I 
smiled, a bit sarcastically. 

He waved the suggestion away as he might a bitter dose of 
medicine and looked me straight in the eye for a full moment. 
He had aged in the three years since I had seen him. His mut- 
ton chops were grayer, yes. the whole outline of his face was 
older and the thin locks running back over his huge ears were the 
shade of his vaults of steel. His enormous frame was more 
stooped than I had known it. 

The sharp blue eyes grew sharper as his composure slowly re- 
turned. The old vigor of psychological conquest came back with 
a rush, and I could see that Joseph C. Denfessen, president of the 
Willianitown Xational Bank was undergoing a revival of nerve. 
I'll admit that I trembled for a moment, but only for that 
moment. 

"Have you the money?" he snapped, with that distinctly origi- 
nal inflection I knew generally broughi results. 

I shook my head, looking him in the eye while I leisurely rolled 
a cigarette and lit a match under the edge of the desk. I shut 
my eyes for a moment in the ecstacy of the first inhale, blew a 
cloud of smoke into the untainted atmosphere of the airy office, 
and again dropped my glance to his. 

"No," I replied a bit indifferently, "I just dropped in to see 
how the old town looks. I'm on my way to 'Frisco. Having 
some lime between trains, I go! curious and wandered up town." 

"You remember my words!''" he asked harshly. There was 
just a slight catch in his voice. 

"Ob, well." I ventured, reaching for my hat, "if you wish to 
rake up old differences, it's time for me to be on my way. Don't 
for one short second imagine that T am not wise to the details of 
the conditions you imposed. I haven'l the money for you, and 
what's more. I am not likely to have it. Make two or three more 
threats if you want to. The law of limitations would handle the 
case nicely anyway. But go ahead, there's the 'phone, ft would 
raise a line row here in town, but I can stand it if you can. 
If " 

A knock at the door to the banking room interrupted me. He 
rose to answer it. 

"Wait just a minute." He hesitated about saying it, but a 
second knock hastened his invitation. I nodded. 

I was alone in the quiet office. The soft bang of the door had 
closed out the noise of traffic from the street and the harsh sound 
of feet shuffling and scraping on the tiled floor. I glanced about 
at the well-remembered pictures of old. psalm-singing hypocrites, 
who had ruled the institution in days gone by. Then my glance 
was irresistibly drawn toward the small private safe set behind 
the desk and on the corner of the rug. Its rusty little iron wheels 
sank into the yielding green plush. 

A sarcastic chuckle escaped my lips. It was rather strange 
when you come to think of it: one of the smoothest "bookie-;" 
on the grand circuit — I thought I was at least — sitting with 
propriety in the inner sanctum of an institution, where the 
"lung green" first has its official being. 

When I tapped the till of that self-same bank lor live hundred 
three years before, I actually meant to pay it back. I told the 
old man so. Imt he forbid me to come back to Williamlown again 
until I had the money. But I don't know, I went down to New 



January 15, 1910 



and California Advertiser 



31 



York, wandered into a fas) bunch and learned their easy bunco. 
I floated into Pittsburg, and <liil a turn of three months lor be- 
ing too fresh with my talents in a poolroom. That rather soured 
me on mankind in general, and the race track got me. But Wil- 
liamtown never knew, for I wasn't using my own name 

And so, I had been thinking it all over in the hank's most 
private privacy until mv eyes had been arrested by the sight of 
the little safe of former days. How nice and even the gold was 
lettered along the top ! 

"They must have put new letters on while 1 was away," I 
said to myself, cautiously stepping over to see if they were really 
new or were merely glossed by the glimmer of reflection. I 
leaned oier to gel a belter look al them. No, they had not been 
redone ; only the 

1 caught my breath. It was really careless of the old man to 
leave the door to bis private safe unlocked. Yes, it was ajar 
about an eighth of an inch. Perhaps he was only keeping private 
papers in it. 'Twouldn't do any harm to see. The heavy iron 
swung hack stubbornly. 

"Must be about ten thousand in that pile," I muttered as I 
reached in to feel the velvety erispness of new bank notes. The 
one between my thumb and linger whispered with a faint, famil- 
iar accent. I pulled it out just a trifle. There was the old man's 
name, properly signed in the corner. 

I straightened up and closed the money, box carefully. A step 
brought me to the window-, where the breezes broke through the 
iron grating and cooled my brow. The alley to the rear was still 
with the quiet of noon. On the doorstep of a rear tenement, a lit- 
tle girl was crooning to her doll in a childish babble of song and 
scolding. 

Hardly had I seated myself again when the old fellow entered, 
his head bowed in meditation. He looked up. The door to the 
banking room swung open behind him and T could see the clerks 
hard at work over their books and accounts. People were coming 
and going outside the gilded netting. 1 looked at the round shoul- 
dered boys again and shuddered. i\'ol for me! 

"John," my host faltered, "I wish you'd stay here. There 
hasn't heen a man in the hank 1 could take any interest in. since 
you left. Leave out the past, John, and come back to the work. 
I'll give you a job here in the bank. You can earn that money 
back and pay it a few dollars at a time. Blast it, John, it ain't 
the money so much anyway." He sal down heavily. I really 
couldn't look him in the face, you know; not and Eeel thai ten 
thousand sinking into the flesh over my heart. And yet 

"Oh, shucks, what's the use?" I blurted, unconsciously re- 
verting to a Eavorite example of boyhood cursing. I looked a\\:i\ 
and glanced out into the counting room. 

A girl with pink roses wreathed all around the top of her hat 
was talking to the bank's teller. Suddenly, she looked past him 
and straight al me. she seemed bewildered for the moment, 
and then her memory set her aright, and she nodded. Her smile 
was genuinely frank, and she actually looked pleased to see me. 
Honest to God, 1 hadn't had a girl smile like thai at me in three 
years. She looked again, peering through the meshes of the 
teller's cage, and the smil" still lingered over the rounded tip 
of her shoulder as she turned to go. There was the revival of 
old desires— of love if you will -in that glance. The sweetest 
ilia nee on earth, it bad onee been to me. I swung about in my 
chair. The old blue eves had been watching me. 

"Is \ell married?"] asked. 

lie shook bis bead. I simply bad to do something. The old 
man's glance was questioning me. 

So l just Blacked ten thousand dollars' worth of bank notes 
on the desk. The dirty, rumbled piece of currency I took out 
of my pocket hook looked mean beside those new strips of green, 
but I deliberate^ topped off the pile with a five hundred dollar 
bill. His eves weir steeled for a second: then they soften* 
in them was std! one more question. 

"I'll start in on thai job to-morrow. Pad." 1 answered — Buf- 
falo Times. 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 




THE GOOD NAME OF 





HUNTER WHISKEY 



IS WORLD WIDE, ITS REPUTATION UNSURPASSED 



HENRY CAMPB & CO., INC., 

Distributors for California and Nevada, 

San Francisco, Cal. 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 

Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately, 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601. 

Mark Lane, Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 245 Bush St. 
Phone Kearny 2629. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged: manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORN EYS-AT-LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law. Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
205-206 Westbank Building, 830 Market street. San Francisco. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 
People's Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United 
States at the hotels and residences fn Oakland, Alameda and Berkeley. 
Special attention to trans-bay baggage. Phones Oakland 4447; Alameda 
456; Berkeley 14; San Francisco, Kearny 679. 

Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street between 

Kearny and Montgomery streets- 

With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets. Chamois. 

Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 

Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties, Telegraph Poles, Shingles, Split Shakes. Etc. 
Main Office — Crocker Bide. San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 

ALFRED BANNISTER 

EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 



Brushes 



1434 Post Street 



San Franciaco 



Phone Kearny 2871 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Hush's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



-A FAIR FACE MAY PROVE A FOUL BAR- 
GAIN." MARRY A PLAIN GIRL IF SHE USES 

SAPOLIO 



San Francisco News Letter 



JAN0AKY 15, 1910 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $10,868,164.20 

Deposits 20.612,588.66 

Cash and Sight Exchange 10,916,762.32 

Isaias W. Hellman, President I. W. Hellman. Jr., Vice-President 

F. L. Lipman, Vice-President Frank B. King, - - - Cashier 

George Grant, Assist. Cashier W. McGavin, - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs, Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Isaias W. Hellman Wm. F. Herrln Leon Sloss F. W. Van Skklen C. DeGulgne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan H. E. Law Dudley Evans J. Henry Meyer 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Chas. J. Deering Wm. Hass F. L. Lipman E. H. Harrlman 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New accounts 

are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000. 



Reserve, $6,000,000 



DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES . 

Arrangements have recently been completed under which the branches 
of this Bank are able to issue Drafts on the principal points 
In the following countries: 
Austria-Hungary Finland Ireland 



Belgium 

Brazil 

Bulgaria 

Ceylon 

China 

Crete 

Denmark 

Egypt 

Faroe Islands 

NO DELAY IN 

San Francisco Offic 
some streets. 



Formosa Italy 

France Japan 

Fr'ch Cochin-ChinaJava 
Germany Manchuria 

Great Britain Mexico 



Greece 
Holland 
Iceland 
India 
SSUING. 



Norway 
Persia 



Russia 

Servia 

Siam 

South Africa 

Straits Settlements 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 



Philippine Islands West Indies 
Roumania and elsewhere. 

FULL PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION. 



-Bruce Heath cote, Manager, California and San- 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,529,978.60 

Deposits, December 31, 1909 38,010.731.93 

Total Assets 41.261,682.21 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS — President, N. Ohlandt: First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier, "Wm. Herrman; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, 
A. H. Muller: Goodfellow & Eells. General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte. Ign. 
Steinhardt. I. N. Walter. J. W. Van Bergen. F. Tillman, Jr.. E. T. Kruse 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH. 2572 Mission street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer. Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement street, between 6th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 
Manager. 

Central Tnicft Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue 
Accounts of Individuals, firms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world. 
Capital paid in, $1,500,000. Surplus, $100,000. 

B. G. TOGNAZZI. Manager. 

French Savings Bank 

108 SUTTER ST.. NEAR MONTGOMERY. 

Paid-up Capital $600,000 

Total Assets $4,270,800 

Strictly a savings bank. Open Saturday evenings from 7 to 8:30, 

OFFICERS— Charles Carpy. President: Arthur Legallet. First Vice- 
President; Leon Bocqueraz, Second Vice-President; A. Bousquet, Secre- 
tary; A. Bergerot, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS — N. C. Babin. J. A. Bergerot, O. Bozio, Charles Carpy, 
Arthur Legallet, G. Beleney, H. de St. Seine, J. M. Dupas, Leon Boc- 
queraz, J. E. Artlgues, J. S. Godeau, John GInty. 

SAFE DEPOSIT BOXES FOR RENT. 

The French -American Bank occupies offices In the same building. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. E. CORNER SANSOME AND PINE STREETS. 
Capital, $4,000,000 Surplus. U, 360.000 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, President; H. FLEISHHACKER," Vice-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER, Vice-President; C. F. HUNT. Vice- 
President; R. AI/TSCHTJL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTE1N, Assistant Cashier; 
F. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit, available throughoul 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 

Italian-American Bank 

S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

Paid-up Capital $760,000 

Surplus 210,000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers in foreign exchange. 

Officers — A. Sbarboro, President; A. E. Sbarboro, Cashier; H. J. 
Crocker, Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro, Assistant Cashier. 




LOVE'S GARDEN. 

There cc s ;i dream of a. garden's old-time bliss, 

Of a rose's breath and a dream god's magic kiss. 
Let ns forget, remembering only this. 

There breathed a sigh and fluttered a slim, eool baud; 
There gleamed a selling sun o'er a paling strand, 
An aftermath in a dim and quiet land. 

There flowed a stream whose low. sweel niiinnur fell 
Through vales where grew Hie sad-eyed immortelle, 
And blossoms frail and mingled asphodel. 

A moon rose 'nealh the purple hood of night; 
The vines, dew-stained, hung limp in sallow light; 
dine from the wood a sleepy thrush took (light. 

Then the dream ebbed faint and far from the lover's heart, 
And the eyes of One met his with a vague, chill start; 
Near by a flower lay broken and torn apart. 

The moon went out, yet close to the lover's breast, 
Like a wraith of mist that floats in the sunlit west, 
Lay the Soul of the Dream, quiescent in peaceful rest. 

But his sight grew dim, and the darkness stiffly lay 
On the lips he sought with passion and dismay; 
The Winds of Change blew cold from the dawning day. 

There comes a dream of a. garden's old-time bliss, 
Of a rose's breath and a dream god's magic kiss; 
Let us forget, remembering only this. 

— Paulina Bramdreth in Smart Set. 



THE DANCE. 



The lamp of silver and the lamp of gold 

Make all the shifting prospect fair and bright. 

We meet, we gaze, each other's bands we hold, 
We clasp and move together in the light. 

When laughter, talk, and movement shall be done 
We may not linger past the hour's mark, 

We must depart, unhelped by moon or sun, 
Alone ami separate through the utter dark. 

— Edward Lucas White in Ainslie'i 



UNCHANGED BY TIME. 
While in her happy home she sees, 

Willi pride and joy. her children dear 
To manhood come, and womanhood, 

From year to year — ' 

Still, still, enshrined within her heart, 

One face can never older grow — 
The little child she loved and lost 

So long ago! 

— Eugene C. Dohon in People's Magazine. 



CONTENTMENT. 
She saw the busy world go by; 

"And I will go along!" she said, 
"For life is only worth the while 

Where thousands tread !" 

She saw the merry world go by; 

"Pass on ; I do not care !" she said. 
"I have, a cot where sunshine lies 

Upon a baby's head !" 

— Emma A. Lente in the Smart Sei 






EtUbllthed Juty 20. 1556 





Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 22, 1910 



Nc. 4 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott. 773 Market St.. San Francisco. Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal.. Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office— 30 Cornhill. E. C England. George Street & Co. 

All social Items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number ef the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Only ninety years until we shall write it A. D. 2000. 

What is wanted is a Panama zone population of Ameri- 
can farmers. 

Cuba is awakening. The craze for good country roads 

has struck all classes. 

And now it is the Hindus' immigration that is giving the 

Asiatic Exclusion Club spasms. 

Ballinger has gotten himself into a position where ex- 
planations that explain are in order. 

The Ballinger-Pinchot investigation is so full of politics 

that the real issue has to be guessed at. 

Eighteen Supervisors farmed out on twenty-two' com- 
mittees is spreading them out very thin. 

Perhaps it would be well to secure Lake Eleanor beyond 

peradventure before building water clams. 

Who helped himself to the graft records in the District 

Attorney's office? Tt is important to know. 

Taft tells Congress he wants conservation of natural re- 
sources. Is that the best song in the hook ? 

"Rig Jim" Gallagher is "doing" the Mediterranean coun- 
try, and he has the price of it in his pocket. 

It would be real mean of Los Angeles to annex San Diego 

before th.it burg arranges for a Panama Canal blow-out. 

The insurgents are not half as wrathy as they were. They 

could not stand being cut on" from the public pap supply. 

. You (In nut have to go all the way to Washington to find 

out the value of official patronage. Do you see the point? 

Railroad train wrecks, automobile smaahups and ocean 

craft landing mi rocks are distressingly frequent these days. 

After spending millions upon millions on public improve- 
ments, Paris. France, has decided to spend $180,000,000 more. 
Taft's special messages arc full of logic and legal » 

hut the] l"'l- "id feel like chunks of ice fresh from the North 

Pole. 

Apartment 'muse building is not a craze in San Fran- 
cisco, lint barrels of money are going into that kind of invest- 
ments. 

It is a little early yet to apply for soft snaps with the 

I. but wait with patience. They will In- on tap 
later on. 

A Roosevelt boom for 1918 is in the saddle, and they say 

be is perfectly willing that the nag may do its level best to un- 
horse him. 

Sutter street car patrons will soon be ready Mr a row if 

the cars are not sen! through to the Ferry Building faster than 
a horse-car walk. 

A searching party to dis. over the whereat 

is talked of. Tin \ want to tell him the news — that he did not 
ly be still believes he did. and is rest- 
ing on his lain 



Not less than a dozen Congressmen are after Cannon's 

shoes as chief ruler, but he proposes to hold the fort through one 
more Congress, at least. 

Municipal ownership of street railways is a success in 

San Francisco, so far as issuing bonds is concerned, but bond 
pay day comes later on. 

At a reception the other day, Taft shook hands on an av- 
erage of forty a minute. And last, but not least, he is trying to 
"shake" the Roosevelt boom. 

San Diego's pretensions in the Panama Canal Celebra- 
tion is like the small boy that got mad because bis daddy's red- 
top boots were too large for him. 

It would cost New York City nearly $8,000,000 to give 

women teachers in the public schools the same salary men teach- 
ers get. But are they not worth as much? 

"The higher you go the easier it is to sail." says an a; ia- 

toi\ But a few hundred feet more or less will make no differ- 
ence when it comes to lighting in the dull thud way. 

The public libraries of Ibis country received last year 

gifts valued at $4,000,000. No town or village is happy these 
days without well-stocked hook shelves for the public's benefit. 

The new powers that he give notice to everybody in New 

York City that "joy riding" in official automobiles has got to 
cease at once, or department heads and employees will have to 
walk. 

Secretary Wilson, of the department of agriculture, in- 
vites everybody to tell him all he or she knows about the in- 
creased cost of living, cause thereof and other opinions along 
that line. 

Tt took 5000 snow ahovelers to .lean thi 

York after the recent blizzard. Of course, all Men Yorkers could 

not come to San Francisco, but no doubl they would like to 
come and stay. 

Millions of American citizens are as 

explain the high cost of living, and the hurl of il is. that Can- 
non and Ahlrich only Smile the smile of satisfaction when the 

question is 8 

When it comes to digging up the streets lo in-tall a water 

distributing system, it is to be hope 1 that the work may be tin- 
before the winter rains start in to do business. Swearing 

would be minimized. 

Speculate as you like concerning P.M.'. but he who thinks 

that Tail is n't at work on a special train for his own US 
profit is not a close observer of what is going on in the army of 
public pap suck 

England's gun for the new batik-hip weighs eighty-five 

ions and throws a shell of 1850 pound- I 

through fifteen inches of armor plate s\en miles distant 
dentlv King Edward intends to hunt for big game. 

Now that the United 8 'he where- 
abouts of the North Pole, and that expeditions 

'Id. Glory on the peak of the South Pole, will 
he charged with he claims everything 

tween his outpost discover 

Chicago's traction merger includes all the surfa- 

1 roads in the citv. Their individual capitalization 

>ital of the trust mi! 
ovide for new lines and betterment 
a "tms the Taft admini-tration is not a howlii . 



E BM T <S> HU A L 



INT 



"Preventive charity," or, as it is 
Preventive Charity. characterized by the ■ Associated 

Charities workers, "adequate relief," 
is the system of aid now practiced in this city by the central 
philanthropic agency. Its plan is not that of giving a loaf of 
bread to the starving or a scuttle of coal to the freezing, but to 
catch the unfortunate at an earlier period of his trouble, give the 
necessary treatment and put him in such shape that he will not 
require the more urgent and conventional relief later on. It 
means a vaccinal ion of the patient so that he will be immune 
from the disease of poverty. 

This system is a daring one, albeit a scientific application of 
the lessons [earned by the study of cause and effect. It requires 
a larger appropriation, at a given time for any one case of relief, 
and the use of ready money in an effort to slop future depression 
and poverty possibly means the scarcity of money to meet cur- 
rent cases of destitution winch arise from time to time. Xot 
that it carries the idea of a neglect of the cases of distress that 
come up normally in a city's winter, but that there may be less 
money on hand lor the purpose of meeting current demands for 
bread and coal. 

But the new system is aimed to save the soul as well as to warm 
the body. Carried to its perfection, and granting a perfect, even 
if unfortunate, class with which to deal, poverty might be elimi- 
nated. Though that might not do, since there is always with us 
the Biblical comment, which many take to he a command, "The 
poor ye have always with ye." 

In its application, the new plan of the Associated Charities 
seems to he admirable. Furthermore, if has. during the limited 
time of its application, worked successfully. 

Miss Katberine Felton. Secretary of the Association, has out- 
lined its work in several public addresses, and has cited instances 
of its usefulness. 

There is one case of a man of intelligence who became addicted 
to the drug habit. He was poverty-stricken before, and as the 
habit grew, became poorer and more dependent. He was taken 
in hand by the Associated Charities. Two hundred and fifty 
dollars was spent to give him treatment at. an institution, and 
sanitarium, and to eare for his family during the period of the 
cure. He was discharged cored, .and fortunately, being funda- 
mentally of the right stuff, has remained cured. Now he occu- 
pies a responsible position, with fourteen men working under 
him. He has been made resistant both to poverty and to the 
drug habit. 

In that case the Associated Charities spent $250 out of hand 
on a theory — an uncertain problem in a human equal inn. Aud 
it got the right answer. 



Tin: Public Play- 
Geocnd Pboblbm. 



hi' the new ideas of public sen ice 
which are spreading rapidly through 
the world, and which are being de- 
veloped in San Francisco with a 
sagacity almost coi tnsurate with Hie requirements of the com- 
munity, there is none which strikes at such a fundamental prob- 
lem of society as the idea of the public play-ground. 

It is a curious instance of human blindness that it is just 
within the pasi few years thai city dwellers and city officials 
realized that the urban child needs outdoor opportunities as ur- 
gently as does the country boy and girl. 

San Francisco has now in operation several play-grounds, and 
several more are being put into shape. The Municipal record, tlie 
paper issued by the Board of Supervisors, slates that work on 
the North Beach play-ground is being furthered with gnat 
strides. The boys section is practically complete, and tin; 
work on the girls' enclosure is under way. The gymnasium ap- 
paratus for the boys' section will be installed at once. Exeat 
for the swimming tank is under way. 

So the two great joys of country life arc to he brought to the 
city hoy. He may get as earth-stained and as "dirty" a- be 
pleases, and he may have the swim he craves. 

The Municipal Kecord also slat.'- that the work on the South- 
side play-ground is well under way. it is to have an iron fence, 
which will make it more alluring to the bov than it would be if 
it were hidden behind a construction of tall boards. 

The play-ground idea is curiously uew Eor such a fundamental 
need of the child. Probably the social workers— if there were 
any such— of a generation ago, believed that the country boy 



played out-of-doors in the wide spread fields, not because he 
needed space and air, but because he had no paved Greets to dart 
over, no racing teams to dodge, no vicious corners to linger about. 
The logic seems to have been that the boy would select a con- 
gested street for his playground in preference to a spacious lot 
where freedom of motion was guaranteed. Either that view was 
taken, or the people did not care what became of the boy, just so 
long as be did ool break the public's windows nor steal the pub- 
lic's fruit from the corner stand. No other provision than the 
streets was made for the hoy or for the girl. 

Bui the present generation of adults saw something different. 
It saw the danger-, the difficulties, the stifling conditions of the 
city streets. So the cities went into the problem thoroughly. 
First, hoy-' clubs were organized with grounds where boys could 
improve their spare and sportive hours honestly. The Columbia 
Park Boys' Club in Ibis city was probably the first to take up 
the out-of-doors ideas with any zest. Then the city itself awoke 
to the realization that what a club, supported by charity, could 

do in one section of the town, could be done i v , tensively and 

generously by the city itself in several district's. 

So now we have the playground system, with its important 
attributes — tic greateBl of which is a swimming tank. 

In some cities in the East, it is believed that school yards are 
for children at all seasonable hours. Here the notion has held 
generally and most absurdly that those yards may only be used at 
recess times, and that the child is a vagrant who would loiter 
around the yard after school closes. Probably by the next sum- 
mer vacation the city authorities will have decided that if it is 
wise for the city to expend considerable sums of money in con- 
structing definite play-grounds, it might be equally sane ami 
sagacious for it to provide a small sum so thai the school yards 
may he open as play-grounds during vacation. Then, in time, 
swimming tanks, or at least shower baths, may be pro\ ided In the 

-ii Is for the use of the athletic youngsters. Must we wait for 

Hetch Ifetchv water before that is consummated? 



Two Xot Better 
Than One. 



The evils of the dual telephone sys- 
tem in a < ity are daily becoming 

•■ apparent to the nnhappv San 

Franciscans who liml themselves 
with two telephones in their houses or otliees where they formerly . 
bad but one, and that one efficient and reliable. The double ex- 
pense might be endured, but the double ringing at the same in- 
stant, the double annoyance of two channels of intercourse with 
one's acquaintances, and other doubling and even multiplication 
of inconveniences, are causing the San Francisco public to« 
awaken to the error it committed when it admitted the extra 
telephone that was not needed, in view of the high grade service 
of the existing system. As the telephone rates are lixed by city 
ordinances, there can be no competition between the two systems. 
The only financial difference is that of the extra cost oi the extra 
telephone. 

The dual system has been tried in other cities, and alwa; 
suited in annoyance to the public. One good system is both bet- 
ter and cheaper than two. no matter how good either or both 

may he. . 

We have troubles enough as it is. Let us not invite others, 
such as the clumsy dual telephone system. 



San Francisco has voted to have a 
To Fight new water supply system, most likely 

Ih ii it 1 1 etch v. the Hetch Hetchy. ami incidentally 

any amount of litigation before the 
powers that be are ready to turn on ,m adequate supply of pure 
water. The magnitude of the undertaking precludes the possi- 
bility of securing a source of suppbj and constructing tie 1 neces- 
sary dams and conduits to store and conduct a sufficient quantity 

to consumers tor several years to come. S e hold that the 

entire programme can lie completed in ahoiit live years, but that 
is a pretty short time to complete such an undertaking, and 
should court proceedings intervene to enjoin the project, or 
should the Secretary of the Interior deem it his patriotic dutj bo 
delay the undertaking, it might be five years before a positive 
movement is made i, v the engineers. The city has voted the 

i \ appropriation, and decided upon where a source of supply 

shall he sought, hut all that is little more than an expression i 

hi i ity's desire and earnestness, and at this moment the in 






JANUARY 22, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



tions are that there may be several slips between the cup and 

the lip before the gourd hangs safely at the well. Certainly it is 
foolish for the present municipal authorities to promise that the 
nt'\v plant will be completed in five years, and an ample supply 
Of water flowing into and through the street and house tubing 
of San Francisco, unless the present powers that he expect In 
continue in office until the work is completed. 

So far as local litigation is concerned, it may he considered 
more of a threat than a serious purpose to retard, much less 
defeat, the project, but there is danger of serious hindrances in 
the "ttice of the Secretary of the Interior in Washington, and 
by the Turlock and Modesto Irrigation plants of Stanislaus 
County — both county enterprises, and each depending upon the 
Hetch Hetehv watershed for its water supply. These two irri- 
gation districts are already up in arms against the San Francisco 
project of securing the Hetch Hetchy and Lake Eleanor, also 
against any move in the direction of utilizing the Tuolumne 
River. The Hetch Hetchy would be of no value to San Francisco 
without the Tuolumne. Ever since the project of the Hetch 
Hetchy was first broached by San Francisco, the Modesto county 
irrigation districts have worked against it, anil Secretary Ballin- 
ger is loaded up with reasons and surveys and expert, testimony 
to show that to trespass upon the rights of these two water dis- 
tricts would result in depopulating Stanislaus County. These, 
then, are a few of the obstacles that will be found in acquiring 
Hetch Hetchy and Lake Eleanor, to say nothing about Ballinger's 
hostility, which seems to be based on general principles born of 
a conservation craze. 



The Ambitions 
of San Diego. 



San Diego is a pleasant little town 
with growing pains in its long legs, 
even though those legs are not yet so 
long that they can stride up and 
down the State with any degree of annoyance to Central Cali- 
fornia. It is a happy community, with many millionaires and 
much fresh paint. It has a bay, where bathing is delightful and 
fishing is good. 

Now it would have an exposition. It would celebrate the 
great engineering achievement of the ages. San Diego either 
misjudges its size and capabilities, or what is more probable, it 
misjudges the importance of the Panama Canal. 

Now the Panama Canal is not an irrigation ditch which is 
going to bring wonderful fertility to a barren region. It is not 
merely a ship canal which is going to expedite trade and com- 
merce in a favored district. If it were either of such important, 
but minor undertakings, it would be well for San Diego to cele- 
brate it. Then San Diego could adequately honor the event with 
its brass band and speeches by several secretaries of the Presi- 
dent's cabinet who happened at that moment not to be in too 
great disfavor to make their presence unfortunate. 

But the Panama Canal is a world's work. It is the greatest 
divorce decree ever issued, and in these days, when the divorce is 
the symbol of progress, it should be honored by the greatest city 
directly to be benefited. 

San Francisco is the greatest city. New Orleans would like 
to honor the opening of the Panama Canal, and so would Gal- 
veslon and Little Hock. They all will be benefited by the canal. 
But San Francisco is the logical seal for such an event. 

San Diego should gracefully retire from the struggle. Cali- 
fornia should get together on the mailer. If ii does not, there 
is the terrible danger that. Denver. Colorado or Marshlield. Ore., 
may put in a bid and get b united State behind their pretensions 
and win out. All San Diego has to do is to realize the import- 
ance of the canal to the world. As soon as it. does that, it will 
slop lis pretensions. Then we can all be happy. 



There was a notable gathering of 
House of Govbrnoks. distinguished and influential '■ 

can citizens in Washington on 
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of this week. Duly twice be- 
fore in the history of this country has there been such a conven- 
tion. It is called the "House of Governors," thus named hv 
Theodore Roosevelt, who originated the idea during his Presi- 
dency, and under whose Presidency the tirst and Becond conven- 
tions were held, and no doubt it has already become a fixture in 

ministration of the unofficial concerns of the nation. 
annual gathering! - es and territories 

as 11 House oi i. ox mi rs - a most unique assemblage from many 
view-points. So long as the House of Governors stands as the 



embodiment of the commonwealths in their individual Statehood, 
so long may every citizen say, "God reigns and the Government 
al Washington still lives." The House of Governors has no 
legal authority whatever. . It cannot suggest any sort of legisla- 
tion nor even indirectly interfere with the running of the small- 
est cog in the machinery of the national Government, yet in a 
sense the inner meaning of a House of Governors is that this is a 
Government of sovereign States, and that so long as a House of 
Governors is possible, no room will he found in Washington or 
anywhere else for a centralized power to usurp the rights of the 
commonwealths in their individual or collective capacity. 

But that is not all the good that should accrue from annual 
conferences of Governors. Their labors, although absolutely un- 
official, could and doubtless will conduce to great good to the 
States as States, and to the nation as States united in a federa- 
tion for mutual good service. Especially will this obtain if 
the several Governors will compare notes as to the efficacy of 
certain laws and legal customs in certain States where such 
laws and customs obtain and are operative with the conditions in 
States where they are not operative. By such comparison, if the 
information gained is acted upon at the suggestion of the several 
Governors to their own Legislatures, should eventually bring 
about greater harmony between the States as separate common- 
wealths in regulating public service, industrial and transporta- 
tion utilities and in the administration of law, especially in serv- 
ing and granting extradition service. In time this ought to bring 
about greater uniformity in criminal, marriage and divorce laws 
to the end that ultimately all such laws and regulations might, 
meet with no friction, their uniformity making a crime in one 
State a crime in all the States, with substantially the same legal 
proceedings and degree of punishment alike in the several com- 
monwealths. This would be a centralization of power theoreti- 
cally, and actually so. for the purposes aimed to accomplish 
without increasing the authority of a single individual State or 
delegating to the general Ooveroment even a remnant of existing 
authority or sovereignty of the commonwealth as an independent 
Government. The greatest weakness of the federation of the 
States is in their contradictions of principles of State rights, 
which comes altogether from antagonisms growing out of op- 
posing laws for the regulation of the social establishment, includ- 
ing whatever of a puhlic nature all the people of each State 
have a common interest in. All these advantages and benefits 
ought to accrue from these annual conferences of the House of 
Governors. 



With opium placed on the forbidden 
Onrt Deab Smugglers. list, the smuggling of ii <>n the 

Pacific Coast has becom 
ingly profitable business. Moreover, as the present limited stocli 

in Chinatown becomes depleted, prices will soar higher still, 

and the acuteness of the demand beget an increased an 
smugglers. Alread] every secret avenue of entry is being tried, 
and with a great deal of sun ess. for while the custom officers un- 
aware that operations are going on, ii i J difficult to get a line on 
them on account of the drug being of such little bulk 
handy for concealment. Alexander, the longshoreman, who, on 
landing from the Pacific Mail liner Korea, was discovered with 
a livc-tael tin in his sock, furnishes us a sample of what we may 
expect. Longshoremen sailors, -. women — they will 

all learn to take a hand in it. and so long as it is permitted for 
the stuff to be taken aboard ships at foreign ports a great 
it will be distributed to Pacific Coast cities. Then there are the 
hi and Mexican borders to be watched, and the pirate 
wending between here and South Sea Island ports. On 
the whole, and without amendments to our maritime regulations 
in this regard, or an addition to our custom service, there is lit- 
tle doubt that there will he as much opium in sight for the 
opium-fiend and the creating of him as ever there was. It is 
quite possible, too. that with the number engaged in the trade 
we will have more using the drii2 than ever. Onlv I' 
servative can in the end r esist the wares that they peddle. Co- 
der such conditions, what. 1 of regulating the tr 
we do not take decided measures to =ee that thi na are 
carried out. For more reasons than one. we want an in 
or better customs service — a service where every man i^ ( 
and not made up of dubs appointed through political pul 
we could stand for an extra Government cutter or two on the 
And in total of this, the penaltv >pium 
should he n re that the few caught would serve as an 
object lesson to frighten others out of the bus 



San Francisco News Letter 



.1 wuaky 22, 1910. 



What hope do our present condi- 
A Problem of lions and economic maehinerj ol 

the Future. life possess for the middle-aged man 

of no special talent who is gradual!) 
working himself into a state of uselesshess. And what hope do 
those tilings possess to the man who lias been crippled in some 
dangerous industry and under our present laws, as they are in- 
terpreted, finds little or no redress. Truly this is one of the 
greatest problems with whieh our Legislatures and law-makers 
have to deal. Always is it the mediocre class, the people of com- 
mon abilities, who form the base of a nation, and yet it is this 
very base which falls prey to this greatest of all evils. It is a 
worm gnawing at the heart of our race, and we have mainly been 
unconscious of it so far because our ideas of success and ad- 
vancement have been along lines of nervous commercial haste. 
The dollar at any cost, has been our cry. and in real essentials it 
has usually been at more cost than gain, of course, the road of 
development is no straight, smooth-flowing path for any people. 
There arc bumps and plunges and tides. But we have al las! 
reached that point where we must pause and consider. In spit. 
of the success of the few — indeed, because of it — every man has 
a righl to live. And the common man. because he is the com- 
mon man. has more right in this respect perhaps than any other. 
But our courts almost invariably, when he appears before them 
for justice, deals out to him loud-ringing but unspecilic generali- 
ties and judgments founded on precedents that have to do with 
earlier condition-, and which do not apply to the changed times. 
Whatever redress he gets, indeed, comes from that minority of 
judges who, above hard-gummed technicality and process, are 
students of their era, and realize that certain statutes require 
a newer interpretation, which morally means that new statutes 
are necessary and justified. The man of energy is inclined to 
pass such mailers over lightly, for the man of energy is usually 
intensely egotistical. But this same man of energy is very often 
in the end the one whose need is greatest. For shipwrecked in 
tin' whirlpool of hi- own ciirrcnl hi 1 conn's to understand that 
life is meanl for all alike and not some in particular. When he 
at last gets down to real figures, lie finds that more men are 
killed and .rippled in one year of commercial life than during 
the whole Civil War. The remedy is plain. Our laws should 
provide a pension for over-aged and crippled employees from 
the corporation for which they have worked; or if not for the 
crippled employees, then a proper settlement at the time of their 
disablement adjusted to some fair scale set for dangerous indus- 
tries. Without resorting t.. the coxitis, this might in the most of 
cases be arranged between the union and the corporation. An- 
other thing i< thai the class of dangerous industries is much 
wider than commonly supposed or recognized: and even outside 
this danger line altogether, that is with regard to other industries 
it should be seen to thai thei pay more 3tric1 attention to the 
health and welfare of their employees. The better a man is 
taken care of, the better are the results of his daily grind, and 

the less it becomes of a daily grind to him. The man who without 
advantage has struggled faithfully for himself in the common rut 

of modern social life has likewise struggled for the g 1 of his 

country, and bis country has a right to look- after him. Let us 
lake care of our common .'las-, for through them only .-an we 
reach greatness. Practically all the other nations of the earth 

have turned their attention to this problem. II is time America 
should do (lie same. 



The condition of the roads in the 
Bad Roads. Stale of California is being com- 
plained of bitterly by auh bile 

owners who have been attracted with the idea ol' a mid-winter 
tour, in their cars. The roads are mostly in a deplorable con- 
dition. Around San Francisco, for miles, il is necessary to pro- 
ceed almost hub-deep in mud. The count v roads are passable, 
but when it comes to the roads about the liamlcfs and -mail 
towns, they are found in an execrable con. lit ion. 

In Marin County, from Sausalito to San Rafael, i- a broad 

highway that should be one of the finest in the state. It winds 
among the most beautiful scenery California or any other coun- 
try affords. Overhead is the blue sky of our beloved State. 
Around is the mountain scenery that is unrivaled, under the 
body of the ear is a sea of muck and mud. In Ihe ear is a 
growling, swearing man and a load of nnenlbusiastic motorists. 
and the pleasure of the trip is utterly lost in trying to guess 
whether (lie car will disappear from view in the next chug-hole 



or whether it will turn turtle !>.■ duck and make the further 
shore. And we haven't had one-half our allotment of winter 
rains. 

I do not wish to be hard on this particular stretch of road. It 
is as good and as bad as any in the Slate. There are many fine 
•eel, stretches along the distance, but they shine as attractive 
oases in the sea of slime. 



To prove the fact that there are 

A Northern Road. others it is only necessary to cite the 

fact that, in order to make a dis- 
tance of fifty-two miles, by automobile from Sacramento to 
Yaca\illc. recently the owner "of a powerful car had to traverse 
one hundred and fifty-two miles. The great distance covered, 
in order to negotiate Vacaville, was because of road conditions. 
It i- just barely possible that if the car had been provided with 
paddles, instead of wheels, this would not have been necessary. 

There is absolutely no good reason to advance as an apology 
for such deplorable road conditions. The taxation in Yolo, Sac- 
ramento and Marin is high enough to ensure the very best class 
..f highways in the world. We have taxation in Marin, in certain 
sections of the county, where the tax-payer has absolutely no 
representation. T know of many cases where the roads haw been 
built and are maintained by private parties, unaccepted by city 
and county. I know of one case, Mill Valley, where the valua- 
tion of the property is $1-150 and the tax is something like 
forty-five dollars odd for the year 1909. This forty dollars rep- 
re-enls town and. county tax. The taxpayer has no roads, no 
sewers, no lights, no water, no gas, no police, nothing to show 
for his money. Every public utility is furnished by private 
parties, an.l is paid for in addilion to the above tax of four 
dollars odd a month, ami is supposed lo apply to the county's 
good, and pari of it. presumably, goes to the road fund. This 
is an isolate,! authentic case, and there are others. What is done 
with this large sum. thus raised? The same rate in taxation, in 
Prance, give- that land of good road- highway- that are perfect. 
in -innnier or winter. It will not do to bring Ihe question-of 
labor and its cost into the argument, as it cannot truly be said 
to have any bearing on (be ease el all. It seems to be a con- 
tinual extravagance and waste brought about by an imperfect 
knowledge of road construction ami a crass ignorance of road 
maintenance, rather than by any deliberate graft. 



The repute of the photo studios of San Francisco extends 

from the Atlantic to the Pacific, and the fame of the city in this 
line has been spread world-wide by such establishments as the 
Taber-Stanford Studio. This is located at 110-118 Geary street, 
and the appointments For picture making are the best the city 
affords. Tl is one of the features of this line establishment that 
their artists onlv purvey Ibejiest in photography. 



-Lots of women do odd things for the purpose of getting 




CH AS KEILUS & CO m 
HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 

THE PARTICULAR MAN FINDS DISTINCTION IN CLOTHES FROM 
THIS FASHION CREATING SHOP. WE HAVE OUR PICK OF THE 
BRAINIEST TALENT IN EXISTENCE. NOT BEING CONFINED TO 
ANY MAKES OR BRANDS MEANS WE GET THE BEST. OUR EF- 
FORTS ARE APPRECIATED BV MEN WHO UNDERSTAND THE 
MERIT OF READY-MADE CLOTHES. 



UAHMENTS 
BEARING 

lilts LABEL 



<E|7as^eilusA(jfIai: 
rancisncia 



CARRY 
SATISFACTION 

INSURANCE." 



mn 



Did yon ever stop to think that there are "seconds" in cloth- 
ing as well as anything else? At this time, especially, such 
■■ i" i It's :i n- 111 ii.-iiKuul by the "charitable sale makers." 
"Something Cor nothing" is not the way we conduct our 
business. Wo are not clothing philanthropists," nor are we 
iti business for our health. We ask Legitimate prices for our 
Koods, and in return grive you quality and value. Can we 
do more? 



Jewelers Building, ?oA Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



January 22, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




'om 



Tffr&c Grrf Mc J* Ari/at Am/ 
'Qaedtat mil flay dv dotfiir; uvdiyouf' 




iuia! 



That some useful occupation should be provided for the 

males of future generations, is a necessity recognized by some of 
the leading and most progressive women of the present day. At 
the rate man's prerogative as'wage earner is being usurped by the 
Eormerly weaker sex, the time ; s not far distant when men shall 
be of little consequence except, perhaps, as feeble obstacles to 
present lines of social and political progress, anil the project for 
universal peace. Mrs. Louise K. (iillson. treasurer of the 
National Council of Mothers, in recognition of this crying need, 
contributes an admonition to the effect that sons should be 
taught lo cook and sew, which has been seriously considered by 
women addicted lo advanced thinking, on the Pacific Coast. In- 
deed, one prominent student of civicism appears sufficiently lib- 
eral lo include washing. I hope my readers will agree with me 
in the importance of this endeavor to reconcile existing condi- 
tions with the inevitable. Some people may feel skeptical regard- 
ing the practical valnc of these suggestions, but then, some peo- 
ple are so constituted as to he unable to see anything intelligent 
in this life — even in a mirror. 

It requires a high degree of courage for a modest man to 

confess his superiority over all his fellows, and this being ad- 
mitted, there are few, I imagine, who will deny that Mayoi 
McCarthy is a brave man. We may go a little farther, in the in- 
terest of fair play, and admit there is nothing the matter with 
the nervous system of the man who believes himself wiser than 
all who have gone before, and who, by his ads. endeavors to dem- 
onstrate the correctness of his theories. Our Mavu- has already 
shown himself a success as a wiper-nut of obsolete contraptions, 
and now he has the sponge poised over another reminder of an- 
tiquity, linking us lo the street car of our daddies. He has said 
that the Sutter street horse-car is to go. The masterly inactivity 
of tic brains, so long permitting tin- absurdity, can lie likened 
only lo (he jagged streak of inlelle, tuality which originally con- 
veyed the city's birthright to the lap of monopolistic ownership. 
I in this, McCarthy, and much that you are -me in do and leave 
undone in the future shall be Eorgiven. 

Although possessed of a natural inclination to differ with 

the leamcd editor ol the ( Ihronii le on all po sible occae I 

am compelled this one time lo agree with linn perfectly when lie 
affirms thai one point -there is thai cannot be m clear to 

the voters in connection with our public utility bond issu 
that is, (hat we do qoI owe anything on accounl ol the 
until they are issued and -old. In solving such grave and intri- 
cate problems as the above, our contemporary has been so very 
right so exceedingly often thai 
sciousness in which he grows bis opinions commands m 

at inn and engages m\ civility. In it were pi 

lo strengthen the above masterly opin ghl he men 

thai accepted am lee it ies m lini lit uly must I 

issued and -old. lull the money musl lie n ire any ohli- 

11 o( indebtedness is assun 

li has been demons i v one 

hundred mos esired, and those 

who have ( sited Honolulu, whei lerimeni has been suc- 

cessfully demonstrated, are preps stify that there is more 

rejoicing, owing to improved conditions, among the tei 
left to prey upon humanity, than could possibly fall to I 

h have been denied their usual card r of crime. 

This latter information is proffered for the cons 
who resoluti 

. traditions and pre 

No cruel I 

! . the murderer of 
Court when il set her free to battle with : 

y he who all horror 

man. 



The maxim, "Every dog has his own day," does not applj 

lo the toy dog. Every day in the week belongs to Hie to 
and in addition to other good things each dog has his maid. Mol 
infrequently it is the custom lo have a kennel maid with four or 
li\e assistants. And yet. very seldom a toy dog Looks genuinely 
content and happy. I doubt not that many a one would be glad 
to exchange places with the ragged chewing-gum merchants of 
lender years thai are habitually met at the entrance of theatres 
and the end of street car lines, and at the risk of striking horror 
to the souls of those good people who affect to believe that the 
members of our humane societies are ton pure and holy to be in 
any manner mixed up with the welfare of anything of smaller 
importance than a pedigreed pup. I suggest that the experiment 
might lie made. Mayhap the disreputable little humans might 
enjoy the qpchange, too, although, be il understood, this sugges- 
tion is made in the interest of the dog. 

The committee appointed to correct false impressions 

created by Professor Thomas' opinion concerning feminine 
motives in the affair of dress, has dissolved itself into numerous 
minority reports in order that this momentous matter may be 
placed before the public, from various points of view, in an in- 
telligible manner. Speed the work, for time presses, and after 
the public has been educated, there remains another Lmportanl 
task for the committee to perform — the education of themselves. 
Serious problem this, that the committee has in hand, almost as 
serious as a jackass, and quite as ridiculous. With Professor 
Thomas on one side, and the ladies on the other, (he public 
should he well informed if it would hut consent to believe either. 
It must not he forgotten, however, that the public believes that 

to be a lie. which contradicts the testimony ol' its own ignor- 
ance, and all Ibis missionary work will not, against its will, make 

it one jot. (lie u iser. 

Mr. .lack Johnson has signified bis perfect willingness 

thai former President Roosevelt should referee the advertised 
contest at listieuil's between himself and Mr. James Jeffries. His 

reasons for thus desiring lo drag the ev-]'resident from the soli- 
tude and obscurity of his African jungle- and permit him to 
again stand mil prominently againsl the bright background of 
reflected popularity are. some of diem thai he lei- been .1 careful 

-indent of both men. our nation's chief leader 1- 1 1, collected, 

and thai "no one could gel ." Thai all who have lived 

contemporaneously with Mr Roosevelt will endorse this 1 
-ion of personal confidence and admiration, be ao 

doubt. 

A gifted contemporary pi' a woman the hi 

of a wreck because sh 1 jump overboard with her 

babe unless her husband abandoned in unsinkal 

craft, at ter to dn land. ' I 

as he was told, and now Faces an explanation with the owners. 

Although there is no law on the wka prohibiting 

from printing such stuff, at In- own 11 bis own 

the crime is none the nful, ami • 

earn for tic ablation on the part of all 

fully inclined nun in put an end to him at the firs; available 
opportnni 



RED & WHITE 



BURGUNDIES 



FROM 



C. Marey & Liger-Belair 

Nuits, France 

Charles Meineeke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 



San Francisco News Letter 



January %%, 1910. 




The erudite editor of the Chronicle, heaven rest his bram. 
imparts the rare information that, "unfortunately, crime Eorms 
the foundation of the majority of the scenes which %11 but the 
better class of nickelodiums portray." while "legitimate drama, 
on the other hand, is instructive and thought-provoking." A 
fine distinction. A wild-cai is a wicked, tierce and dangerous 
animal, hut on the other hand a tiger is covered with stripes and 
has a long tail. Nickelodiums, like newspapers and the legiti- 
mate drama, delight to portray Bcenes of carnage, honor and 
crime because these pictures are what their patrons most desire 
and are willing to pay for, and all three are. strictly and solely, 
money-making propositions. They are all purveyors of desired 
information ; they are patronized by human beings, and humanity 
thirsts, particularly, for tales of slaughter, misery, wickedness 
and calamity. Mankind delights, as do other brutes on earth, in 
the spilling 'of blood of its kind. When wars become unpopular, 
when prize-fights fail to draw crowded houses, when public inter- 
est in murders and other crimes of particular atrocity no longer 
justifies the printing of extra editions, when, in tact, the thirst 
for human blood shall have somewhat abated, the more decent 
form's of entertainment may become objects of more than pass- 
ing interest, fn the mean time let's be honest. We want sensa- 
tion and gore and lots of it. The newspaper rarely prints what 
the community does not want ; the stage dares not seriously offend 
public opinion, and the question of principle usually steps ten- 
derly aside while business is done on the basis of ducats on the 
one side and demand on the other. The stove is not made a whit 

whiter by giving the kettle an extra coating of black. 
* * * 

Mayor McCarthy made a balcony speech at the opening of the 
new Columbia Theatre. There were other things, too — gowns, 
beauty galore, and picture hats, quickly removed, that would 
make a man see Heaven — and that not because he had to look 
above them, as he sometimes does. Then beyond all this there 
was William H. Crane in "Father and the Boys," George Ade's 
stirring comedy. However, the play didn't matter. Nothing 
mattered but that it was the opening of the new Columbia Thea- 
tre, and that San Francisco, loyal to itself, was supping the ab- 
sinthe of memories. Unfortunately, one of these concerned Win. 
H. Crane — a remark he made one time before the fire when in an 
irate moment he called San Francisco "a jay town." Mr. Crane 
has made many amends for that since, and loves the city by the 
Golden Gate as well perhaps as any of ourselves, but one party 
sitting in front of the writer was in much too loyal a mood either 
to forgive or forget. 

"Oh, that franc! that franc!'' he mumbled with abhorrence, 
when the actor had concluded bis curtain speech. "That Crane !" 

The lady in the case, however, was in much too high spirits 
and too beautifully gowned for small vengeances. 

"Well," she remarked with consideration and an amused lilt- 
ing of her brows, "he did not call San Francisco by that kind of 
a. bird, anyway." 

» * « 

Beautiful Gladys Boston, well-known in social circles, is one 
of the twelve young ladies who will participate in the witches' 
dance, which is one of the features of Professor Napoleon, to be 
put on at the Valencia. Miss Boston, in consequence, has 
manner of speaking of Professor Napoleon as though it were an 
individual instead of a play. Meeting on the street the other dav 
a friend, with whom was another young lady from Los Angi s 
well-known to Miss Boston, and being asked bow was Pro 
Napoleon, the impulsive girl gave vent to the following: 

"Oh, isn't he fine!" she exclaimed. "And my dress is so nice 
(referring to her costume.) "I think we will go through it 
beautifully, don't you? And there is going to be bits of flowers." 

The young lady from the country was completely astounded. 
"Why, Gladys," she said, reproachfully, "I didn't know that 



you were going to be married — and well — really — I thought you 
bad more sense than to marry a professor." 
'» * » 

And so, through the courtesy of Max Pill, we are to have a 
floating theatre, and on Bay Farm Island, off the Alameda shore, 
another Coney Island, where the floating joy-riders can get off 
and stretch limbs and conscience. Fine idea. Mr. Dill is aware, 
of course, that whatever happens on an island is surrounded by 
water, and that water will surround anything. Adam and Eve, 
Eor instance, could never have been driven into the wilderness 
had tin.' Harden of Eden been insular — even though the snake 
under such conditions were a sea-serpent, as be probably would 
have been. For since Robinson Crusoe discovered the footprint 
in the sand and dreaded it wasn't a woman's, an island has been 
a temptation. It would have been a safe proposition for Eve, 
and we think it will be for Dill. In regard to the floating thea- 
tre, however, we would advise Mr. Dill not to launch it with a 
stock company. Under any circumstances it couldn't help but be 
watered slock, and the general public have a champagne taste in 
theatricals — particularly after the show. 

* * * 

The City Hall cat was in one of her grayest moods. When a 
gay Tom came up, and in the darkness caressed her on the cheek, 
<\\l- didn't even have the spirit to hand him one. 

"What are you doing?" asked the gay Tom in his most thrilling 
tones. 

"Building air castles." returned the gray cat, grayly. 

"Is it easy to build air castles?" inquired the gay Tom, bring- 
ing his paws together in the ecstatic hope that it might at last 
be a cottage built for two. 

"Yes," responded the gray cat, pensively, "they never use 
brick, mortar or anything." 

"And what is an air castle?" asked the amorous Tom, puzzled. 
."The new City Hall," returned the gray eat, with precision. 

* * * 

If you love your sweetheart, send her a tarantula, a centipede, 
or a chameleon by mail. Or if she has hurt your feelings, and 
you want to sting her back, mail her a rattler. Or again, if you 
wish her to commit suicide for your sake, send her tin asp. Very 
few girls would pass over an opportunity to die like Cleopatra, 
even if they were to die of it. The delirium of such a death has 
many possibilities and satisfactions. No one is going to quarrel 
with a woman in her last moments if she is bound to consider 
herself beautiful and tragic. So send your sweetheart an asp — 

it will make her happy. Besides, a fad's a fad, whether ifs g I 

or bad. 

* * * 

It is reported that one old Scotchman and his wife, through 
the ecstasy and patriotism that a Lauder conceri inspired, man- 
aged to make their way behind the curtains in the Dreamland 
Kink in search of the inimitable Harry. They found bint after 
some meandering just coming out of bis dressing room, and the 
old Scotchman greeted him With trepidation. 

"We bae come in In sec ye." he said, "we bae come in to sec 
ye." And then be si I gazing downward. 

"Well, look at me." said Lauder, extending bis hand cordially; 

"look at me." 

But in spite of the handclasp the old gentleman was still 
gazing downward/ 

"I am," he said. "I'm a-lookin' at yer legs." 

* » * 

This story comes from Los Angeles. When Louis I'aulhan. 
the aviator, made bis high light the other dav, arousing such 
tremendous enthusiasm, his pretty French bride, a woman id' 
sparkling temperament and charm, immediately upon bis descenl 
rushed to greet him with open arms. 

"Oh, Louis, Louis," she exclaimed, "you're a little god, and 1 
love you — and they all do." 

"Of course I am 'the little god.'" returned I'aulhan. joyously. 
"Look at the length of my wings." 



E. B. COURVOISIER. 

Art Dealer, Frame Maker. New store, 131 Sutter street, be- 
tween Stockton and Powell. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



.1 \\r\RY 22, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



• A EMft ©If MM® Mistoiry 

By Aktihik H. Button. 

Abdul Hamid might have been Sultan of TuTkej to-day, albe- 
it shorn of his old despotic power, had it not been for the dis- 
loyalty ol* an American soldier of fortune, whom lie had raised 
I rum obscurity to a post of the highest honor. 

This man was Eansford P. Bucknam, erstwhile Admiral of 
the Turkish fleet and Chief Naval Aid to Abdul Hamid. Had 
Bucknam aided Abdul Hamid with the guns of the fleet, 
the erews of which remained loyal, the task of Shefket Pasha, 
commander-in-chief of the revolutionary army during the re- 
cent uprising of the Young Turk party, would have been rendered 
far more difficult than it was. The Turkish warships commanded 
the Golden Horn and the entire waterfront of Constantinople. 
They mounted guns ranging from the small rapid-lire and 
machine guns up to powerful 9.2 inch and 10-inch weapons. 

With his fleet loyally supporting him, Abdul Hamid might, 
and probably would, have reached such a coin promise with the 
Young Turks that he would have still retained the throne. At 
the worst, he could have escaped to the flagship, could have gone 
to some other part of his empire, and there established another 
capital, for the Young Turks had no navy. But Bucknam 
wished to be on what he felt would be the winning side, and de- 
serted the Sultan in his extremity, with the result that is well 
known. 

Bucknam Pasha was a native ol' Nova Scotia, who came to the 
United States when a boy, entered the American merchant 
marine, and became a naturalized American citizen, afterwards 
holding various positions in the merchanl marine. When Tur- 
key had a war-vessel, the Medjidie.h, built in Philadelphia. Buck- 
nam was engaged to navigate her to Constantinople. Upon his 
arrival there, he made an impression upon Abdul Hamid, who 
had him commissioned a captain in the Turkish navy. There- 
after his rise was rapid. He was made commander of a squad- 
ron; then was sent lo Berlin as a special envoy "I' the Sultan. 
and upon his return was decorated with I be Order of the Osma- 
nicb. and raised to the highest post in the Ottoman Navy, lie 
was liberally showered with wealth and honors. Along with 
him, another American. YV. II. Ledbetter, a graduate of the 
United States Naval Academy of the class of iss;;. whose for- 
tunes were at a low ebb, was also taken into the imperial favor 
and made captain of the imperial yacht. 

When the revolution broke out. practically all of the Turkish 
navy was in the waters around Constantinople. It in 
among other vessels, such new men-of-war a- | ie battleship Mi 5- 
soudieh, the up-to-date cruisers Medjidieh and. Abdul Hamid. 
some smaller gunboats, and a Dumber ol destroyers. With these 
at his disposal. Bucknam commanded the water, lie could have 
made things decidedly warm for Shefket Pasha. While the lat- 
ter could have entered Constantinople from the oorthward, the 
guns of the fleet could have held him at a rlis om the 

Golden Horn and (be Bosphorus. Nothing could run 

easier than lor Abdul llannd. , riven from bis palace, 

to have taken refuge on bis ships. There be could have negotiated 
with the revolutionists m capture, lie could 

snrv. have goni i \laruiora. -a 1 , it I': i: - 

kipo, where, under the shelter ol the guns of the fleet, he 

have established himself temporarily on shore. It 

understood that the artillery troops manning the batl 
Dardanelles remained loyal to the last I' such we 

Abdul Hamid could have proceeded to Ana Minor an 

up a new Ottoman capital. Indeed, even if thi'v had i 

I '.oval, it might yet have been poss 
swift Turkish men-of-war to have rut; 

Like Benedict Arnold, however, Bucknam failed :■■ i am the 
respect of those whom he served, by betraying tic mi 
made him. of retaining 

had delivered over to the Young Tui ! . and 

reduced to the command of a 
of soldiers, disloyalty is regard? 

- 
mo at thi- i sion. 

Soldiers of fortune 
without exception fxvn lev- 
am! Ledbettci have provi 
rule. 



Pears" 

The ingredients 
in many soaps, re- 
quire free alkali to 
saponify them. 

The rich, cool 
lather of Pears' does 
not result from free 
alkali, fats or rosin. 

Pears' and purity 
are synonymous. 

Matchless for the complexion. 



TFrH ATT TAVERN CO. 

■L JLjV-^-JL JLJ. X. \*J COR. EDDY and POWELL STREETS 

Phone Douglas 4700 

Restaurant. Cafe, Ladies' Grill 

Special Lunch served during shopping hours. 

Concerts daily during Lunch, Shopping hours. 
Dinner, and After Theatre. 

The orchestra is under the leadership of the gifted and talented 
young Violin Virtuoso. Abe *Wise. 

Under the management of MR. A. C. MORRISSON 




New 

Poodle 

Dog 

Restaurant 

and 

Hotel 



N. W. Corner 

Polk & Post Sts. 

San Francisco 
Phone 
Franklin 2960 



For Oysters 
Moraghan's Restaurant 

26 Ellis Street 

Music during dinner. Open Sundays. 



Jules Cafe 



now located at 328 Bush Street will be in its per- 
manent quarters. MONADNOCK BUILDING, on March 1st. 



San Francisco News Letter 



Janiwi,-, ■>■!, L910. 



€SnIbw©inia@ini &w& Sdh\@@Il &fans@§ 



By Habriett Watson Capwell. 



Under the influence of the three theories governing modern 
education — the ding-dong, the yap-yap and the pooh-pooh — the 
public school s fast destroying the prophecy of the little red 
.school house on the hill-top, where our forefathers conned the 
three ITs. The school curriculum has expanded beyond the 
dimensions conceived by the elder school masters, and is daily 
receiving further inflation by the liberal pedagogues who recog- 
nize the hand and heart as well as the head. In fact, the line 
R's are reduced to insignificance, and as a result we have univer- 
sity graduates who say "I seen" and "he don't," but they can 
figure to a nicety the maximum bending moment of an expansion 
bridge. Children in grammar schools must know something 
about the chemical reaction of doughnuts; they must be able to 
carve the leg of a chair, and feathers! itrh a gored skirl. No self- 
respecting child is denied the use and understanding of the skil- 
let, the saw and the scissors. The slate pencil is not used. There 
are reactionary critics who maintain that these modern innova- 
tions are sheer nonsense, and that the children are trained 
leither in the crafts nor in letters, and in consequence we arc 
idding to the half-baked citizens of the world. 

The subject of education has always interested clubwomen, 
and my quarrel with the San Francisco Women's Clubs has been 

with the lethargic interest they have taken in the use of scl I 

buildings. I have pointed out to them that after School hours 
there are hundreds of buildings that are not earning their way 
for the tax-payers. The clubwomen have concerned themselves 
with the school currieulums, endorsing or expressing disappro- 
val of this, that and the other innovation, but they have hereto- 
fore added nothing to the impetus of the modern movement of 

the school house. Months ago I told the readers of this co] a 

of the realization in other cities of the possibilities of the school 
house as a factor in the development of neighborhood and muni- 
cipal spirit. After the school children hare skipped home, the 
school house should be thrown open to the parents, but San 
Francisco has turned the locks, and only on infrequent occa- 
sions has a school house blazed welcome to the taxpayers. But 
now the School Board has fallen into the line of progression, 
and this week the first entertainment of a series was given at 
the Mission High School. Mrs. Mary W. Kineaid, of the Board 
of Education, represents that body on the committee supervising 
the series of lectures. The other members of the committee are 
Miss Katherine Felton and Miss Amy Sussman, of the Collegi- 
ate Alumnae: Dr. Caroline Rosenberg, Council of Jewish 
Women; Mrs. Louis Hertz, California Club; Mrs. James Crau- 
ford, Women's Auxiliary to Juvenile Court; Dr. Langlej I'orter, 
San Francisco Milk Supply Association; Dr. R. G. Broderick, 
Board of Health; Walter MaeArthur, Civic League: William 
P. MeCabe, E. 1. Wislor. and Leo Michelson, Union Labor. 

These names give some idea of the organizations Interested 
in the movement, and the civic sections of a number of chilis 
not represented on the committee, are likewise pledged to help 
defray the cost of the entertainments. Musical selections and lec- 
tures make up the programmes, and the parents have some pleas- 
ant evenings in store. But I question whether the good people 
interested in the movement will obtain the best results by these 
"set" programmes. In the Eastern cities, where the school 
house has in the highest fulfilled its night duty, the parents have 
not been listeners, but participants in the entertainment. 

In Cincinnati, in a particularly rough ward, a choral society 
was organized in the school house. Fathers and mothers big 
brothers and sisters, met, and under splendid leadership gave 
expression to their pent up musical enthusiasm. The membership 
grew until it overflowed, orchestras were formed, and even a 
brass band was sifted out of the musical material presenter! 
Within a year, eight saloons which had once flourished in thai 
neighborhood were obliged to shut up shop. Their prosperity 
waned as the interest in the music grew. All nations met under 
that roof, and raised their voices to the tunes of every school of 
music. 

New York and other Eastern cities have their musical settle- 
ments, but out here that phase of settlement work has not yet 



found expression. Around the musical settlement in New York, 
of which Waller Damrosch is the director, there lias grown a 
neighborhood feeling tor the art which finds expression in the 
home life. Why should not San Francisco have as many musical 
settlements as there are school buildings? There the grown-upa 
of the neighborhood may gather in intimate numbers Eor musi 
cal recreation. Out of this close companionship and enthusiasm 
there would grow a spirit that would make for better "team 
work" in the city. If we cannot make so large a venture, let us 
turn at least one or two school houses to this use. Mixed voices 
in choral work have proven the besl foundations on which to 
build. Men and women of each particular district who love to 
sing the good old songs are recruited for charter members, and 
soon the whole neighborhood wants to join the choral. The ex- 
perience of other cities has shown that this personal contact be- 
tween the people of a neighborhood through one of the happiest 
arts of expression makes for better living and cleaner streets, 
it may not always make for musical perfection, but the music is 
a means toward the end — the people are brought together and 
it is not dillieiilt for the right leaders to convert that organized 
strength to the public good. 

The lecture series, now inaugurated, will bring the parents 
together for enjoyment if not participation in the programme. 
It will prove that the school house has legitimate uses outside 
of school hours, and for these reasons it is a reinforced concrete 
step in the right direction. But there is a broad flight of stairs 
yet to build, and we should all be about the business of con- 
structing them. 



A bachelor girl is sometimes an old maid who is ashamed 

to admit it. 



PURITY ESSENTIAL. 
In no other form of food Is Purity so absolutely essential as In milk 
products. Richness is also necessary, as without richness, milk is of 
little value as a food. Purity and richness are the embodiment of Bor- 
den's Eagle Brand Condensed Milk. As a food for Infants or for general 
household purposes It has no equal. 




The 



late 

Piano 



The choice or the Worlds' 
Greatest Prima Donna. 

Madame Marcella Sem- 
brich, both in concert and 
private life. 



The 



lal&uiin 



Piano 



Recipient of the Worlds' Highest Honors at all International 
Expositions. Should be your choice. 



®t|flfal8uiinGl0. 



MANUFACTURERS 
Pacific Coast Headquarters: 310 Sutter St. near Grant Ave.. S. F. 



RABJOHN & MORCOM 

Paintings, Engravings, Picture Framing and Artists' Supplies 
Free Art Gallery 

2-10 POST ST. (near Grant Ave.) 408 FOURTEENTH ST. (near Broadway) 
SAN FRANCISCO OAKLAND 






JaNUAHY ■.'•.', 1910. 



and California Advertiser 







pimswe'sUnd 




By Paul Gerson. 



NetJiersole in "Sapho" at the Van Ness. 

The virtues and faults of Daudet's weepy heroine are once more 
being exhibited to local audiences. Miss Nethersole long ago es- 
tablished her claims to being the most prominent exponent of 
Sapho living. It was in this role that she gained her first Ameri- 
can success and compelled our attention. We have seen others, 
yes, many of them, essay this part, but they all seem to fall short 
somewhere when compared with TSTethersole. It is undeniable 
that she is at her best in this play. She has given the part years 
of study and thought. As in "The Writing on the Wall," we 
see her in the very ripeness of her art, in Sapho we see her in a 
magnificently conceived picture. We do not in all instances ap- 
prove of her characterization, it savors very often of all that is 
common and sensual. It seems, in fact, that she goes entirely too 
far on this tack. In some of us it causes a revulsion of feeling. 
We have always and still do advise judicious mothers to keep 
their young daughters away from such a play. It is a plain state- 
ment, but it is nevertheless a fact, that "Sapho'' would pervert 
the thoughts of the purest. Miss Nethersole could accomplish 
much by suggestion and innuendo. She is entirely too frank and 
brutal in many forms of outward expression which 1ms absolutely 
no place on our modern stage. Degradation need net lie painted 





Marie Cahill in "Tin Boy* and Betty," at ihi 
Theatre. 






Fannie l'-T"'r. who iril! appear in "Fagan's Decision." 
Sun, lay matinee at the Orpheum. 



this 



in livid colors to lie effective. There is go much of fine ait 111 

Mi-s \ • work thai ahe has n 

of this kind. Still, at this time, alter -he has done th 

all these years, we .!o not engage to gel on; i new standard for 
ourselves. The question of broadness and suggestion hat 

ed out before, and Miss Nethersole's methods in this diroe- 
'■n tin' subject of in ii "n. The fad i 

that h.r portrayal - nine wonderful moving ti_ r - 

nre that we have seen before, full of poignant emotioi 
ing In ivoman 

■s a woman, with the same soul, ih -nine heart throbs am 1 
ing-. no matter what her station or place in life. 

We shall not greatly regret in - ng M 
her manuscript of this play to the - S 

she can get plays like "The Writing on the Wall." she should have 
no need to look further. Thai she I of her 

old repertoire this week is indeed a pity, but the call of the publie 
must be heeded, and if th 
■restive, why, that is their lookout Mi— Pfethen 
luring the \< 
Mr-. Tanqueray." That her engagement h 

- is a pity, and the w 
theatrical eireles the pal 
public does not respond mon 
id meritorious 
-tern hook 
us some of the big and leading al 

joying. This is a posi - h threatens 

uslv our theatrical position on the theatrical rr 



10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 22, 1910. 



"Brewster's Millions" at the Savoy. 

Millions are being spent nightly in stage money on the stage 
of the Savoy. This light and airy entertainment seen here before 
is with us again in a new dress, and with a new company. Eoyal 
Tracy, who was out here some years ago with the Frawley and 
Neill companies, is now heading the present organization. While 
it does not contain the names of any particularly well-known ac- 
tors, still the cast is a fairly good one. It is just the sort of a 
play that caters to a typical Savoy audience, and will no doubt be 
a money maker in the popular price houses. Last Sunday evening 
an overflowing house greeted old favorites and new faces, and 
there 'seemed to be general jollification all round. Since the 
closing of the American Theatre, or rather since it has drifted 
into the vaudeville field, the Savoy seems to have filled a long- 
felt want. It jumped into instant popularity, and the attractions 
so far have been uniformly good. We need a house of this class 
here, where the working classes are so well represented, and there 
is no question but that the Savoy will build up a permanent and 
profitable following. 

Tracy is a good light comedian, and gets a good deal of unc- 
tuous humor out of the part. He is bright and snappy, though at 
times somewhat conventional. It is a "fat" part, and one in 
which any light comedian would delight to revel in. It does not 
■ call for any specially effective acting. It is a light, bright and 
breezy entertainment, and will help while away a very pleasant 
evening. None of the members of the company are particularly 
brilliant, but they all seem to work to one common end, and that 
is, to give a good performance. 

The mounting of the play is as satisfactory as one could de- 
sire, the storm scene as usual being effective. The play will, with- 
out doubt, do a big week's business. It is a popular attraction, 
and is clean and wholesome, and is, therefore, recommended to 
young and old alike, who can see it safe in the assurance that 
their ethics will not be violated or sacred dramatic standards 
shattered. 

* * * 

The Orpheum. 

A bill of uniform excellence is again in evidence this week. 
It is opened by Miss Una Clayton and her little company of two. 
Her vehicle is a little hodge podge of nonsense hung together by 
the merest thread, for which she claims authorship. It allows 
Miss Clayton full scope for her peculiar comedy talents. Her 
work is full of life and snap, and she is working hard every min- 
ute of the time. The audience likes the little woman, she is so 
earnest. Francis Morey is a good leading man. and Miss Mona 
Ryan is statuesque and stiff, both in her work and her bearing, 
They are followed by Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Voelker. The lat- 
ter is a violinist of the first class. He certainly can make his in- 
strument sing the songs of the soul with wonderful delica 

touch and feeling. His beautiful playing seems out of place on 
an Orpheum stage, but to the credit of the Orpheum audience 
it may be stated that they seemed to fully appreciate the full ar- 
tistic worth of Mr. Voelker. His wife is'an accomplished accom- 





Max Figrrum, who will appear in "Mary Jane'i 
Savoy next week. 



Pa." at the 



.,?i?'l We A mer - m Alcazar favorite, who re-appears net week in 
All Un Account of Eliza" at the Alcazar Theatre. 



panist, and a worthy assistant for such an artist. Such people 
are a credit to any program. Thej give way to Willy Pantzcr 
and his company. They are a family op unusual acrobats. Ii eil 
work to some of us noi being new. They inject a lot of whole- 
some comedy into their athletic stunts. Their act as a whole is 
most enjoyable, being different in many respects from the ordi- 
nary acrobatic turn, The eight Geisha girls, who are next, are 
a decided novelty. Their act is set in a pretty Oriental scene, 
and they go through pretty antics and evolutions characteristic 
of their country. Thev certainly do know how to manipulate a 
fan in the prettiest way imaginable. They even made an attempt 
to sing, and execute a few steps in their own original way. It 
is a prettily conceived idea, and is vastly entertaining if only 
mildly exciting. 

The famous Italian protean artist, Artnro Bernardi, opens the 
second half of the program, giving a wonderful exhibition of his 
rapid change abilities. We have seen this sort of thing before, 
but not quite as cleverly and cleanly executed as this gentleman. 
His act is highly diverting, and this means that it is splendid 
entertainment. 

The Doherty Sisters are clever dancers, ami one of them is 
quite a fair comedian. They work conscientiously to make their 
act effective, and succeed fairly well. The act of Messrs. Brown, 
Harris and Brown is the only black sheep of the bill, mediocrity 
being stamped all over it. It is assuredly on the wrong circuit. 
However, as stated before, the Orpheum is not infallible. Acts 
of this kirn' will occasionally creep into a bill in spite of all. 
However, we can condone an act of this kind when the balance 
of the program is so good. 

* * * 
The American. 

Idalenc Cotton and Nick Long, in a dramatic sketch called 
"The Banker and the Thief," is the principal feature of the bill 

at the American Theatre this week. Tl tber numbers on the 

bill are very good, and succeed in gaining the applause of packed 
houses. 



January 22. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



11 



Active preparations are being made locally among many of 
our amateur society people in producing a musical extravaganza, 
which will enlist the services of several hundred people. Some 
months ago our society was all agog about the Kirmess proposi- 
tion, which had an immense amount of publicity and which was 
a financial success. Indications point to the present affair as 
being another success. In this, as in the Kirmess, the affair has 
been placed in the hands of outsiders, people who make it a busi- 
ness to go to such cities as will accept them and produce these 
entertainments for n big fat percentage. And it is always done 
under the cloak of charity. The lady who produced the Kirmess 
was paid for her share a sum running well over four figures. The 
acceptance of these people to run our own charitable entertain- 
ments is a sad confession of weakness, or rather it is palpably 
misleading, as we have as clever musicians and dancing teachers 
here, and people with ideas, too, as can be found anywhere in 
this country. Why, then, must we accept these strangers, who 
make charity a business ? It places us also decidedly in the pro- 
vincial class. Isn't it about time we asserted ourselves find show 
these people that we have as much originality of ideas as they 
have, and that we want to keep our money home ? All our local 
charities are most deserving, and we do not have to hire outsiders 
to help us raise money for them. We can take care of ourselves, 
thank you. Let us get out of the provincial class, and be a little 
metropolitan whenever we can. Wake up, somebody. 

* * * 

ADVANCE ANNOUNCEMENTS. 
Marie Cahill and the musical play, "The Boys and Betty," 
comes to the Columbia Theatre for two weeks, commencing Mon- 
day night, January 24th. There will be Saturday matinees only. 
Miss Cahill is surrounded by W. Q. Stewart, Sam P. Hardy, 
Wallace McCutcheon, Jr., James B. Carson, Edward Earle, 
Lucien Kesney, Kenneth Davenport, Anna Mooney, Hattie Fox, 
Mary Mooney and Jane Kutledge. Particular stress is laid upon 

the beauty of the chorus and. the splendid costuming. 

* * * 

Mr. Louis James will appear at the Van Ness Theatre ne\l 
week in "Henry VIII." on Monday, Wednesday, Friday ami 
Sunday nights. The bill for Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 
nights and Tor the Saturday matinee will be "The Merchant "f 
Venice," with Mr. .lames in the great character of the avaricious 
Jew, Shylock, and Aphie James at her best as Portia. 




Max Figman ami "Mary .lane's I'a" will commence an en- 
gagement at the Savoy Theatre, beginning with next Sunday 
matinee. Max Figman will be supported by a strong company, 
including Miss Helen Lackaye and Messrs. Edwin Chapman, 
Franklin Searight, Tony West. Charles Merriwell, Thomas C. 
King, Ernest Warde. David Marlowe, G. H. Stewert, the Misses 
Dorothy Phillips, Nina Ainscoe, .Helen Hartley, and the clever 

child actress, Gretchen Hartman. 

* * * 

Vilmos Weston}', the Hungarian pianist, will appear at the Or- 
pheum next week, for the first time in this city. In appearance 
he suggests Rosenthal, but in his performance he reminds one 
greatly of Paderewski. 

The return of Claude and Fannie Usher in their slang classic, 
"Fagan's Decision," is sure to be enthusiastically welcomed. 

The Four Readings, sensational hand to hand acrobats, whose 
equilibristic feats, somersaults and flying leaps from one to an- 
other are highly sensational, will be a special feature of I lie com- 
ing bill. 

Cook and Stevens, two colored comedians, warranted not to 
wash out, will also appear. 

Next week will be the last of Jean Clermont's "Burleske* 
Circus; Brown, Harris and Brown; the Doherty Sisters, ami of 

that picturesque novelty, "The Eight (leisha Girls." 

* * * 

Leo Ditrichstein's mirth-provoking comedy, "All on Account 
of Eliza," will be the Alcazar's offering throughoul the coming 
week. It was selected as an appropriate medium of reintroduc- 
ing Burt Wesner to the patrons of the Sutter-street playhouse. 
He will' have the role of Franz Hochstuhl, the funny German 
character created by Louis Mann, and it is needless In inform 
the Alcazar "regulars" that a treat is in store I'M- them. 

The comedy will run one week only ami i- to be followed by 
"Alice of Old Vincennes," the pretl of colonial times 

that was ever written. 

\JTJ)tl6lilYl Bet ar s r ?ockto r n"Jii<l Powell. 

Safest and Mo<( Magnificent Theilre in America. 
Week beginning this Sunday afternoon. Matinee every day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE. 
VILMOS WESTONY. the celebrated Hungarian Pianofort. 
nomenon; CLAUDE ana FANNIE USHER hi "Fagan's Decision;" 
KEAl'INGS: COOK and STEVENS; JEAN CLERMONT'S 
;SKE" Cl KOWN. HARRIS 

1" HIEKTY SISTERS: NEW ORPHEUM MOTION PICTURES. 
Last week. Immense hit "THE BIGHT GEISHA GIRLS." 
Evening prices, — 10c., 26c.< 60c 76c Fi<>x seats, $1. Ma 
(except Sundays and Holidays) 50,-. PHONE i 

I. AS ?i. 



New 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner (ieary and Mason Sts. 
Phone Franklin 150. 
Home C 3783. 



■ottlob, Marx & Co.. Managers. 

Two freeka, tKrinnlng Monday. January Nth. Matin. 

only. Daniel V. Arthur pp 

MARIE CAHILL. 

in ,i musical piny of ' 

THE BOYS AND BETTY. 

Book and tyrica bl George v Hob 

Seats. $2. 11.50. $1. SOc, Ke 



Van Ness Theatre 



CORNER VAN NESS A Vs. 
ANT) OROVB STREET 



Gottlob. Marx & Co. Manai: 

Phones: Market 600— Home S 1661 

One week, start.. night. January 24th. 

LOUIS JAMES. 
America's representative plai I by AP HIE JAM] 

Monday, Wednesday. Friday nights. HENRY VIII. 

v. Thursdav nights and Saturday matinee. THE 

MERCHANT OF VENICE 

- now on sale. 60c. to $: 
Next— MRS. LESLIE CARTER. 



Alcazar Theatre 



Sutter and St'-lner Str. 
Phones— West 1 100 H 



Belasco and Mayer. Owners and M 

Monday evening. January Hth. and throughout the we* V 

Ditrichstein's Great Mlrth-Provoker. 

ALL ON ACCOUNT OF ELIZA 
There's a Laugh In Every Line of It. 
Prices — Night. 25c to II: mav 50c 

MATIXEE SATURDAY ANI' 8 I 



Savoy Theatre 



"irk* no 

Hoaae J .«>■ 



Mr. 1 ! appear at the Van Ness ruxi 



McAllister, near Market 

turday afternoon and evening, las: 
MILLIONS. Two weeks. St.. fanuary !*d. 

Other matinees Thursday and '.ssenw 

the eminent eom" 

MAX FIGMAN. 

In his great laughing success MARY JANES PA. 

A modern comedy hy Edith Ellis. - ■»• York City. 

Three months in Chl.-ago. 

Prices — Kc. to $1.50. Popular-priced matinee Thursday. 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 22, 1910. 




Sofl^ 



. fspmu 







A Benedict of Honor has been quoted below par in the matri- 
monial market. Something like a dozen years ago a Matron of 
Honor appeared' on the fashionable horizon of a church wedding. 
Prospective brides all over the world sal up ami took notice, 
Cupid raised a row over the innovation, For In- was wont to mark 
his victims at wedding processions, and a married woman in the 
line of march was equivalenl to a damaged target tor bis arrow. 
But in spile of the protests of Daniel Cupid & < '<<.. the Matron of 
Honor microbe traveled From London to New York, and hit San 
Francisco harder than the hook worm. No fashionable wedding 
was considered the real thing in orange blossoms without a 
Matron of Honor. Besides having the approval of "Lunnon. 
the innovation gave a bride an opportunity to make honest 
selection of her best friend for the position of attendant of 
honor — if her best friend had preceded heT to the altar, she was 
not disfranchised. Mrs. Walter Martin, Mrs. Tins Taylor, Mrs. 
Will Taylor. Mrs. Lawrence Scott, Mrs. Latham McMullin, 
Mrs. Fred McNear and Mrs. Eugene Murphy were a coterie of 
intimate friends who married in rapid succession, and availed 
themselves of the new privileges of a Matron of Honor. 

Mere man. not being able to appreciate all the subtleties and 
hair-line distinctions of such affairs, thought he could choose a 
married friend for best man. The papers have expatiated on the 
predicament of Balston White, who chose Dr. Walter Gi 
to act in that capacity, and therein- put his fiancee, Mies Ruth 
Boericke, to the disagreeable task of asking Dr. Gibbons to re- 
sign in favor of an unmarried friend. Miss Boericke realized 
that a bridesmaid cannot goose-flesh with delight, cannot have 
all the thrill unir? of romance and supers) it ion if she i- supported 
by a married man. And Miss Boericke determined that her 
bridesmaids should have all that was coming to them — that the 
intimate little festivities preceding the ceremony at which the 
bridal party Erolics should not. hamper Cupid by the presence of 
an immune. Vale Dr. Gibbons! "Mea culpa," siv< Ralston 
White. 

Married men have served as ushers at the church, bul 1 do not 
recall a married man supporting the groom a- best man. Walter 
Hobart and Walter Martin have served several limes as ushers, 
but evidently there is no promotion ahead in this line of service 

Precedent has established Matrons of Honor, hut Be licts of 

Honor have hail an adverse decision from the Supreme Court — 
the bride and her maids. 

Society insists that when the final decree of divorce is granted 
Mrs. Entile Bruguiere will become Mrs. Joseph Eastland. At 
present she is ill in a sanilorium, and her rooms are kept abloom 
with the choice floral offerings of her most determined admirer. 
If Mrs. Grundy is sitting on the right guessing stool, Mr. Bru- 
guiere has moved along and Mr. Kastland is only waiting ti 
into his place. When Mr. Eastland was devoted to Pearl Lan- 
ders, now Mrs. Vincent Whitney, they both used to visit at the 
Bruguiere house in Monterey. The' two men. Bruguiere 'id 
Eastland, are said to still entertain only the friendliest feeling 
toward each other. 

Mrs. Frank Powers was one of the guests at the tea which Mrs. 
Ernest Wiltsee recently gave in New York to enable her friends 
to view the portrait of herself and baby by Funk. A Friend thai 

was at the reception writes me that the portrait is not as buc 

ful as the picture which the celebrated artist painted of Mrs. 
Powers when he was out here this summer. The match-makers 
are weaving the material of another romance in this quarter. 

_ The week has been gayer than the calendar has proven for s s 

time. Three balls make a sound like revelry, and if von put your 
ear to the ground you will stil! catch the echo of gayety. ' On 
Tuesday night, Miss Kathleen de Yoimg entertained at the first 
cotillion of the season. The de Youngs are trained in the arl 
of this form of entertaining, never a season passing . c 

hall room does not give an exhibition of this, the prettiest ti er- 
pretation of the dance. The favors, purchased in Paris 
picturesque affairs that made the scene a veritable fairyland and 



PALACE HOTEL 



announces special 

after theatre 

supper service 

and musical program 

in the 

GRILL. 

each evening. 



Hi,... Kathleen, who led the first figure with Edward M. Greenway 
made a charming hostess for the hundred and fifty merry- 
makers who gathered for the cotillion. On Wednesday night the 
officers of the training ship Alert gave a hall, and on Friday 
night the third Assembly ball was danced under the leadership 
of Mr. Greenway. With Lent quietly lurking just around the 
corner, society is making the most of present pleasures, and both 
at the de Young Cotillion and the halls, every one was in high 

spirits. 

.Monday did not attract many people to the golf links, although 
the weather was the sort that beckons to the green lields. But 
society women have apparently lost their enthusiasm over golf, 
and Edith Cliesehi'ough captured the opening honors of the tour- 
nament without any audience to applaud her. It is surprising 
what a good game Mrs. Walter Martin still puts up — she does not 
take golf as seriously as Alice Hager or Edith Cliosebrough. and 

yet she approaches their class. The debutante set celebrated 
Monday at a luncheon at tin- Francesea Club in honor of Miss 
Florence Williams. 

Tuesday had 'wo elaborate afternoon all'airs besides the de 

Young cotillion at night. Miss Gertrude Perry, assisted by Miss 
Ruth Richards, her guest of honor, received Beveral hundred 
friends at an elaborate tea in the gray room of the Fairmont'. 
Many of the same guests also took tea in the Red Room, whor". 
after a spirited bridge party. Mrs. Somers received a number 
of non-bridge enthusiasts at tea. 

Wednesday was distinguished by the naval ball ai the Palace 
ami the dinners preceding ii. Thursday had two bridge parti ■- 
one hostessed by Mrs. Russet] Bogue ami the other by Mr-. 

llahliman Putnam Young. On that - lav. Mrs. Williams 

gave a debutante tea for her daughter, 'diss Lurline Matson. 

(in Friday, Mrs. Russell Bogue again entertained at bridge. 

An unusually large number of smart dinner parties preceded the 
Assembly ball. The Mayo Newhalls, the Andrew Welches ami 
the William Ashes were among those who gave elaborate dinner 

parlies. To-day will be a busy day for every one. In the after- 
noon, practical!) all of society, so large is the Taylor affiliation, 
will attend tire tea which Mr-. Nicholas Kittle is giving to cele- 
brate the silver wedding of Mrs. William Hinckley Taylor. The 
home of Mrs. Frederick Tillmann will likewise he crowded with 

friends, who will have the daughter of the household, Miss \-- 

nes. formally presented. A dinner dance for the younger sel 
will make this one of the most enjoyable presentation parties, of 
the season. 



BLANCO 


9 


s 


O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS 






PHONE FRANKLIN 9 






No visitor should leave the city without seein( 


r the 


finest cafe in America. Cur new annex 


is 


now 


open. 







.1 \\i u;v 22, 1010. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



SoeiM sm& IP©f§@imi1] Atoms 



The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Kingsley, of Provi- 
dence, R. [., were very pleased on Friday lasl to welcome the 
Kingsleys back to Del Monte for the winter. Their trip this 
year is especially interesting in thai it makes their twentieth 
consecutive winter spent at Del Monte. It is. indeed) ver} 
gratifying to the management to sec old patrons returning year 
after year as they do. 

The Transportation Club, which has its quarters in the Palace 
Hotel, gave a pleasant enlertainmenl to its members and their 
friends on Saturday night. This was a Dutch supper and "stein 
Test," which served the donble purpose of providing a unique 
evening for the club members, and also of securing a number of 
handsome steins, which are used for decorative purposes on the 
club walls. 

The hall given by the officers of the U. S. S. Alert in the ball 
room of the Palace on Wednesday, January 19th, was one of the 
most beautiful of the many that have been given there. The uni- 
forms of the officers of the army and navy lent a brilliance to the 
scene which is usually lacking in the civilian halls. The rich 
gold of the ball room forms the finest setting for the costumes 
of both men and women. 

Harry Lauder, the clever Scotch CI Man. who has hern play- 
ing in San Francisco, was the guest of honor at a banquet given 
by the Scotchmen of the city in the hill room of the Palace on 
Saturday night. This was in Hie nature of a farewell, being be- 
fore the last performance. M i was the wine of preference. 

Among those wdio spenl the week-end al the SI. Francis and 
attended the Patronesses' hall were Mr. and Mrs. Roberl I.. Cole- 
man. Mr. and Mis. Alherl Dibble, Mr. and Mrs. II. McDonald 
Spencer. Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Cooper, Mi-. Crockett, Mrs. B. C. 
Schmieden, Mi. and Mrs. W. <;. Hitchcock, Willard Barton, dr., 
and Raymond A.rmsby. 

Miss Brna St. Qoar entertained Monday al tea al the St. 
Francis. The merry parly was chaperoned bj Mrs. Henrj St. 
Qoar, .Mrs. Henry Foster Dutton and Mrs. Charles K. Barley. 
Among the girls who enjoyed the afternoon were Miss [la Sonn- 

tag. Miss Blva He Pue, Miss Anna Olney, Mi-- l> thj ■■ 

Miss Lupeta Borel, Miss Fern la Pratt, Miss Martha Foster, 

Miss .Marie Louise Foster, Miss Mane Bullard, Miss Florence 
Kluff, Miss Laura Baldwin, and Miss Edith Lowe. Thi 
was artistically decorated with holly and red-shaded candi 
and a pleasant hour was spent over the tea-cups. 

Mrs. Charles keonev i- anticipating a vi>it from her daughter, 
Mrs. Theodore Tomlinson (Ethel Keeney) in the spring". Mrs. 

lwnr\ ami her younger daughter, Mi-- Innc Keeni . ire tem- 
porarily established al the si. Francis. The vivacious and charm- 
ing Miss [nnes, who is casl lor the Q n of Witches in "Pro- 
fessor \apni i." ^ doing hm utmost to make i bariry 

affair a success, 

Mrs. F, F, Low and her daughter, Miss Flora Low. were 
hostesses of a luncheon party Thursday at the St. Francis. 
Hobarl also entertained there a group oi congenia ri 
eluding Messrs. Russell Bogue, George P 

and Dr. Mi Liincn 

Mr. and Mr-. Charles Sweeney, Mi-- Sweeney, valel and maids. 
have arrived ffom \>« York, Mr. Swi oe; atified 

unli l.ngc interests in New York, but formerly In 
kaiic where he ua- considered the wealthiest man of t 
tion. They have many friends in San Francis 

Mr-. James II. I'ourie. wife of Captain l'miric. rctuii 
nsporl Sheridan from Honolulu, much to the ■ 
her friends, lew .if whom were aware of her plans. Mr-, j'ourie's 

' rsoualit\ \ in whi. 

chance to lie. and her hospitality during the tint ' 

Mrs. Pourie's residence at the Presidio did . 

make her friends delighted to make the trip (o 

one is rejoicing that she has rel 

turn by the next transport, ren sick : 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough .Streets 

A civn fortAble. high order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN, formerly manager of St. 

Duncan's. 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNION SQUARE 

THE SPIRIT OF GOOD SERVICE AND 
THE FACILITIES THAT PRODUCE IT. 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 



JglL 







HOTELSAVOY 

SEATTLE 

Twelve Stories of 
Solid Comfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping district. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, ft 1.50 op 




UNEXCELLED TRAIN SERVICE 

DAILY TO AND FROM 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE EXPRESS, the through parlor car train, 
leaves San Francisco daily at 2:00 p. m. arriving at 
Del Monte at 5:43 p. m. 

DEL MONTE LOCAL leaves San Francisco at 3:00 p.m. 
daily arriving at Del Monte at 7:21 p. m. in time for 
dinner. 

An Ideal arrangement for week end parties 
H. R. WARNER. Manager Hotel Del Monte. California 



HOTEL VICTORIA 

N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 

A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. Sun in Every Room. 

Elaborate Furnishings. Excellent Cuisine. Lartre Lobby and 

Reception Room. Grill Room. Dining Room 

Mrs. W. F. Morris. Proprietor, formerly of Hotel Cecil 

Bush Street. San Francisco 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Westminster 



Loi Angelet, Cal 

Foonh lod Mm S*. 



American Plan 



REOPENED 



Rates per Day. 12.50 floomi without Bath. 
Rooma with Bath. MOO. 13.50 and MOO. 



European Plan 

$1.00 per day and up 
With bath. 11.10 and up. 



F. O. JOHNSON, Proprietor 



FRITZ MLLLER & SONS 

Proprietors 

Seatiac Capacity. 1800 



Bismarck Cafe 

Leads in catering to San Francisco's epicures and music lovers 
POPULAH PRICES 
Music noon, evenings and after theatre by the famous Herr Ferdi- 
nand Stark's Vienna Orchestra 
PACIFIC BUILDING San Francisco MARKET AND FOURTH 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



JANUARY 22, 1010. 



§SHfo 


Firanadj 


5G® 


T@< 


Ay 


ana<ai 


Ssm 


Fronadie® 


ana 


th® 


IPfflSft- 


=°JKI®o 















By Major Ben C. Tbttmajst. 













It lias been my good fortune to have visited San Francisco four 
times since the great calamity of April, 1006, overtook it, and 
upon each occasion I have been amazed at its wonderful progress 
of reconstruction and rehabilitation. I first saw it after its 
startling overthrow in October of the same year; and 1 was 
shocked and saddened beyond power of description. There 
workmen all around, however, and a few stores on Van Ness 
avenue and half a dozen restaurants on Fillmore and other West- 
ern Addition streets; but all the fine hotels, most of the big news- 
paper buildings, the famous chinking places, the bank and other 
big business blocks, and much else thai I bad known bo well, had 
been either leveled or gutted by the conflagration thai followed 
the temblor; all around was debris; and the thought, came over 
me that it would take at least four or five years to remove the 
ruins and their rubbish, and at least twice that time to rebuild; 
and that possibly what had been considered by all globe-trotters 
as well as by all Eastern visitors and Pacific Coasters as the most 
cosmopolitan, the most fascinating and altogether the most en- 
joyable city on the globe, would never be fully itself again. 

I came one year after, and was amazed at the progress that 
.had been made. The debris had nearly all been removed, and 
much fine building was noticeable at all important points; the 
street railroads were all in perfect running order, and banking 
and other business seemed as if never disturbed; some of the 
former hotels and old-time restaurants were opened at or near 
their former locations, and 1 could see the old spirit of San Fran- 
cisco dominant. 

I came again in October, 1008, two years and a half after the 
most, agreeable and best-liked city on the' face of the earth had 
been laid low — and the transformation, from October, 1907, 
amazed me almost beyond belief. Here was dear old San Fran- 
cisco again — bigger, brighter and better than ever before. There 
were some shreds and patches, to be sure; there were some old 
walls standing and a few old undisturbed holes in (he ground. 
But a tremendous advance had been made along all lines. The 
Fairmont and St. Francis, two of the finest hotels in the world, 
had opened more luxuriously and to bigger custom than ever be- 
fore; two or three of the world-noted French restaurants and a 
number of others, such as Tait's and the Bismarck, were catering 
for tens of thousands of bon vivants daily ; wonderful sky- 
scrapers and other mammoth blocks were ornamenting all the 
leading thoroughfares, and an atmosphere of business content and 
great architectural progress seemed everywhere to prevail. 

Another year has passed, and I am once more in San Francisco 
— October, 1000. And again my amazement knows no bounds, 
for the city is now San Francisco, the superb, and it will 
on growing bigger and finer and more attractive and more ad- 
mired as the years roll by. This very moment it has as perfeot 
hotels and restaurants as may be found anywhere in the United 
States or in Europe; its stores and store windows are not excelli d 
by any in New York or Paris; its marvelous bank-clearings tells 

the story of the city's financial strength by li-un-s thai ',,, 

lie; its street railroad system is well alongside of those in Los 
Angeles and Philadelphia, which are claimed to be the best in 
any land; its press, its clubs, its theatres, its churches, seminaries 
and schools, and many other things that might be enumerated, are 
wholly in advance of the same institutions before the lire. With 
all these achievements, and the carrying out of the many im- 
provements planned, what may not be realized in another two 
years to come? 

There is one thing that may be reckoned on in the rebuilding 
and upbuilding of San Francisco, and that is thai there will at 
ways be more than a modicum of the old California flavor pre- 
served. The spirit of the pioneer of '49 and '50 will never for 
many generations, if ever be wholly effaced. For instance it 
will never be so thoroughly "Eastern," so to speak, as Los An- 
getes. It will always be a cosmopolitan and hospitable city and 
never stingy or Puritanical. Its money is its own, and has al- 
ways been m circulation amongst its own people. Its wealth 
came from its circumjacent mountains, and rivers, its orch rds 
and fields, and not from the East. Many of its thoroughfares 



perpetuate the names of former prominent citizens. 

From its earliest American days, down to well along in the 
seventies, San Francisco was the abiding place of more noticeable 
but generally peaceable freak characters than any city on the 
globe — not in all the cities in the United Stales was there such 
an aggregation of human curiosities outside of museums and in- 
stitutions for the insane. Very early in its history. San Fran- 
cisco was perplexed by a pernicious character known as "llorv 
O'Moore," who was the leader of a gang of toughs and law- 
breakers on Telegraph Hill. He was an Irishman, ami could 
fighl as well as eat, drink whisky all day and all night long, and 
sing songs and make love like a gondolier. He always wore a 
long broadcloth frock coat, with a huge boutonniere of wild- 
llowers. white vest and doeskin breeches, red cravat and silk or 
Panama hat: he was handsome of face and figure, hut as rough 
as a steel trap; he was a stipendary of boss politicians, and the 
slickest ballot-box stull'er the city has ever known. One fine 
morning lie sailed for Sydney, and never returned. 

Another of the earlier curiosities was "Peg Leg Smith," who 
was one of the most peculiar creatures who ever meandered 
Montgomery and Sansome, Washington and Clay, during the 
late fifties. Smith was an Englishman, and came to California 
as a sailor on a British vessel in 1851. His left leg was a wooden 
one. his shoulder and both arms had been broken, and he had a 
voice that would nearly stop a clock; he early became an adept 
at ballot-box stuffing and capping for gambling houses, and was 
cared for by such men as Yankee Sullivan, Ned McGowan, Billy 
Mulligan, Barney Duffy and Jim Hughes, and other sporting 
men of that day ; and when sober he often did some effective 
wire-pulling for David C. Broderick, Milton S. Latham, Win. M. 
Gwin ami other "higher ups." He became renowned as the dis- 
coverer of the famous gold mine, near Grass Valley, which he 
named the "Peg Leg," and for which he was paid $7,000, which 
tidy sum he blew in at faro and roulette in a single night at 
Barney Duffy's. Then he attacked John Barleycorn and was 
knocked out in a single week. 

Another conspicuous freak of the fifties was the "Limekiln 
Man," who was so called because he made his home in the lime- 
kilns at Bincon Point. He was tall and broad and shaggy, and 
his gray hair and gray whiskers were of many years' growth. 
He seldom wore hat or coat, bis apparel generally consisting of 
dark woolen shirt, dark trousers, blue-gray blanket and long 
rubber boots — all these bespattered with lime, lie was always 
sober and otherwise decorous, and residents id' Hineon Hill saw 
to it that he should never be without food or medical assistance 
whenever necessary. Tt was understood by those competent to 
judge that, he had been crossed in love, and that the hats in bis 
attic came after a refusal of a Brooklyn girl iii 1S35. He came 
from New York to San Francisco in 1853, and was returned to 
that city in 1857 by Peter Donahue and others, and was found 
dead in a limekilns near Harlem in 1858. 

An early oddity was "Sixteen-string Jack," a half-brained son 
of the Emerald Isle, who, if he were living to-day, could com- 
mand a hundred dollars a week from the Orphcum management, 
for he could dance and sing and imitate scons of animals and 
birds. Early in his career he wore on his right leg sixteen ribbons 
of almost as many shades or colors ; he wore corduroy knee 
breeches, a jaunty Castilian jacket, and low-cui black shoes: he 
always carried a sbillaleh when made up for a half day on Mont- 
gomery and Washington streets, and sometimes earned as much 
as twenty dollars in an hour or so dancing jigs and warbling dit- 
ties of his own composition. Like many another itinerant, he 
couldn't let "bug juice" alone, and in 1859, after doing a year's 
sweeping out and cuspidor cleaning at the Blue Wing, be drank 
his last dose of whisky and disappeared one night and was never 
seen nor heard of again. Another old freak, such as never will 
be seen again, was "Captain Thayer," the dingy recluse of Hath- 
away's wharf, who had a past that no one knew. 

From tsi;5 to 1875 there flourished a large number of these 
harmless, half-crazed beings, the like of which the new San 
Francisco will never see again. The most noted of all was the 



January 82, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



"Emperor Norton," whose mind became harmlessly unbalanced 
by a business failure in 1858, and who could be seen any fair 
ihtL day for thirty years on Montgomery an.d Washington, San- 
some and California. Clay and Rush. He was a welcome guesl al 
the Occidental and the Lick, Barry & Patten's and Bank Ex- 
change during lunch hours, and was served as well as any one, 
and given a drink free if he wanted it. He was otherwise looked 
after until his death by the men of '49 and '50. He was free at 
all the theatres, and the deacons of the various churches were as 
civil and respectful to him as with their more gilded and aristo- 
cratic worshipers. The "Emperor" first palled himself the "Pro- 
tector of Mexico," and once issued a challenge to Wm. M. Gwin, 
who had been appointed by Maximillian Duke of Sonora, and af- 
terward the "Emperor of the United States." His regulation 
apparel for a quarter of a century was an old uniform of a 
United States army officer, including epaulets, and an army- 
slouch hat decorated with rooster feathers, and sometimes he car- 
ried a sword, and always a cane. 

N"cxt to the "Emperor ISTortou," the best-known freak charac- 
ter in the sixties and seventies was the "Gutter Snipe," a native 
of Prance, whose mind became unbalanced by the failure of 
Adams & Co., in which he lost $7,000, all he had in the world, 
lie was (he very antipodes of the "Emperor" in his freakishness, 
and would neither accept food or coin from any source; and so 
far as was ever known, he never conversed with any one, nor 
smiled nor looked any person in the face. He was unwashed, nu- 
brushed and unshaven, and his habiliments consisted for the most 
part of an old talma ami pantaloon legs of the same material. 
Often from 1861 to 1870 have 1 seen this strange, seedy phantom 
on Montgomery and Washington, Sansome and Bush, always with 
his eyes in the glitter on tin; look-out for something to oat or to 
sell ; and many a rainy day in winter 1 have seen the old. weather 
beaten creature oass the windows of the Occidental Hotel with 
never a turn of the head from the gutter which yielded him his 
daily diet of apple-core or orange peel, banana-end or bil of meal 
or cake that '•Bummer" or "Lazarus" — two well known canines 
of that period — would have refused to have touched. He was ai 
last taken to Si nekton, half-starved to death, and died in 181 I. 

Another strange human of the sixties was "Boberl Mai 
a. lean, lymphatic, sneaky, ragged specimen, who may he fully 
remembered by man] -nil living as wearing a Ion .took 

coat buttoned lightly up to the throat, and for all the WOlld 

ways reminding one of the make-up of a hungry tragedian 

essayed by Brower and Knicrson on the min-i: Hundreds 

of limes have 1 seen Ibis unfortunate being pass I" 1 windows 
of the Occidental Hotel in the late six! i' -. in the same old seedy 
suit: and although he affected eye-glasses be I a ■■■ i, be 

was a lug grease spot from occiput to fee. All that was known 

aliout him was that he had lost $10,000 or theres 

the failure of Adaiu> & Co.. and had become parlialh insane, I 

once had a slmrt conversation with him, in 1868, ami In- informed 

me that he had once taught School in Franklin, N. H., and had 
known Daniel Webster, who owned a small farm at that place. 
Franklin Pierce, John 1'. Hale and George Q, Fogg, who owned 
a free-soil newspaper in in Concord. "Ms 

appeared in 1878. 

Completely different in face and form, dress and appearance 
was the "Great Unknown," who flourished as □ the 

sixties, lie w i- tnon of a mystery than any of the others, and 

seemed to have dropped down upon Montgomet - me morn- 

ing with i made by Tobin, a $10 Fisher hat. 

ami $'.'0 boots made b) Kelly. Whore he obtained his money no 
one knew we only knew thai be dined daily alone al t] P 
Dog, attended Grace Church, and outdressed I 

irge Ensign, Charlie !.. Gaj ami Tom Madden. I 

Belvederes of that day. He disappeared as 
came, taking an immense amount oi brass, if no! 

in. with him. Another pink of perfection, so fai 
went, was "Uncle Freddie Coombee," who for several 
km - and silver-buckle shoes, raffled shirt and t 

ered hat. and believed himself to he "Washing 

ond." II i! New ]•': I 

mannered. But betrayed t ; 

The forthcoming San Francisco wil r any 

like them; and while this elimination n 

its old-time bizarre flavo " by 

the 

Jeemes Pipes of Pi -wile." the - t and sing 

IC Hill, i 



on Montgomery and Washington streets for nearly a quarter ol a 
century; "Colonel Michael Pinkham," "Old Dundreary" and 
"French doc." nor none like them, will ever appear again. 

I have referred incidentally to "Bummer" and "Lazarus" — 
two dogs that were known by more people in San Francisco in the 
sixties than Stanford and Crocker were known by even after they 
had built their palatial residences on Nob Hill. These dogs 
lunched af the Occidental, sometimes, and sometimes at the 
Cosmopolitan ; and they frequently turned up at Barry & Pat- 
ten's, at the "Mint," or at the "Bank Exchange." They often 
accompanied the "Emperor Norton," in his meanderings about 
noontime, and were treated kindly by every one. "Bummer" 
and "Lazarus" had no pedigree, but when they died, they were 
decently interred; their skins were artistically stuffed, and these 
may now be seen in the museum at Golden Gate Park. 



The manner in which trusts are swallowing trusts these 

days is enough to make one wonder if the time is not coming 
when the productive agencies of the country will be under the 
thumb of one' corporation and managed by one general head. In 
fact, is not every move of capital combinations in restraint of 
competition and monopoly ownership and control? 



The Star Hair Remedy, the best tonic; restores color to 

gray hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. All 
druggists. 



$.£ede/wi 

The Quality Hair Store 

1809 FILLMORE, near SUTTER 

Men's Exclusive Department at 2271 California St, near 

Webster. 

A Complete Line of 

Beautiful Wavy Switches, Pompadours 
and Transformations 

and the very latest creations in directoires, chigrnons. Billy 
Burkes and cluster puffs at prices that are reasonable. 
Hair Dressing, 26c and 50c Shampooing 50c 

Manicuring 25c Scalp Treatment 60c 

Onintoniea. a most excellent hair Tonic. 
Artistic. Airy and Ventilated Wisrs my specialty made of purest 
human hair obtainable. Mail orders receive Prompt and Care- 
ful Attention. Established 1866. 



It in with irrrat pleasure thai we announce the opeoinc of oar dawa Iowa MtibtHhateat 
it 418 SLTTF.R STREET between Powell and Stockton, with the newest material* of im- 
ported and domestic pattern* of htfh quality. We hire always succeeded m pteatinc oar 
customer* and ire now better prepared than ever before to rr»e perfect satafactioa We 
have the latest approved stiles from the leading fashioa centers of rhe world, sad oar gar- 
ments are guaranteed to fit perfect!]. 

Fair Prices, Best of Work, Fine Materials. Correct Stile* Perfect Fit. All that's Latest. 
All that's Good. Your trial order is respectfully solicited aod we incite you to call whether 
you are ready to place your order or not Very respectfaHy yoara. 



Oscar Vogel 



HOTEL POTTER 

Where San Francisco Society folk gather. 
MILO M. POTTER. Manager 

Santa Barbara 



16 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 38, 1910. 




A small but vicious-looking war- 
Turkey and cloud is hanging over Greece, or 

Greece at Outs. rather over Crete, and unless the 

Cretans get back into the Turkish 
traces, the Sultan will send the 13,000 soldiers he lias mobilized 
for the campaign to Crete to thrash the disturbers back into line 
under the Bag of the Faithful. Ii seems thai notwithstanding 
Greece promised to quit encouraging the Cretans to snub and 
defy the Turkish Government, tie- Cretan Parliament has agreed 
to substitute the Hellenic code of laws for the Turkish and rec- 
ommend that certain officials take the oath of allegiance to 
King George of Greece. The Sultan has notified the powers 
thai if they cannot keep Greece bound to her treaty with Tur- 
key and recognize in every way that Crete is Turkish territory 
and Cretans subjects of the Sultan, he can and will attend to it 
himself. The conduct of the Cretans is seditious, and according 
to international usages, Turkey would be justified in sending an 
army and putting every one of them to the sword. A parallel 
offence would be a Philippine legislature issuing a decree sub- 
stituting the laws of Japan for those of the United States, and 
recommending all officials to take the oath of allegiance to the 
Mikado, also asking the people to adopt the Japanese language. 
That is exactly the position the subjects of the Sultan in Crete 
have taken. Russia and England have already taken strong 
diplomatic grounds against the conduct of both Greece ami Crete, 
but something more than that will be required to keep Crete and 
Greece in line, and to prevent the Sultan sending an army to 
settle matters. Of course, the powers are apprehensive that 
Turkey may not only move against Crete, hut against Greece also, 
for in that event it would be almost impossible to prevent a 
general war in the Near East. The integrity of Greece is guar- 
anteed by all the powers other than the Germanic and Bal- 
kan States, and Turkey has assured the powers that if she is 
forced to protect Crete against Grecian intrigue and conspira- 
cies she will not call a halt until she has invaded Greece and 
taken a slice or two of her territory. Under no circumstances 
could England see Greece permanently occupied by Turkey. HOT 
could England interfere without crowding Germany and Aus- 
tria, for a war between Greece and Turkey could not help in- 
volving the Balkans, which would give the Austria-Germany 
combine the long-desired excuse lo march down to Salonika. Tin 1 
Cretan matter in itself is a small affair, hut it contains enough 
combustibles to slarl a great conflagration that would be sure 
to sweep all Southern Europe; besides, there seems to lie no 
very great desire for peace, mainly because the armaments arc 
so great that public sentiment is fully tuned up for a struggle, 
especially in Greece, Turkey and the Balkans. Bach of them is 
coveting certain territory, and besides, there is a degree of rest- 
lessness throughout Southern Europe that does not care for 
peace. 



The Knox Plan. 



The Knox peace plan lias reached 
the capitals of the nations, and 
without a single exception it is 
favorably received and pronounced a great scheme for the pro- 
motion of the cause of peace by arbitration, hut right on the 
heels of congratulating Mr. Knox in the most covetous of diplo- 
matic insincerity, every one of them turns In the proper bureau 
and orders a few more Dreadnaughts and a fresh invoice of held 
artillery and small arms. The reason why the Knox recommen- 
dation will be passed by on the other side is because the nations 

are prepared for war. For this preparedness they have I n 

laboring for years and forcing their subjects I" groan under their 
burden of taxes to pay the bills, and in the year 1910, the veal 
Mi-. Knox would have the nations meet in conference to arrange 
to arbitrate any difference that may intrude themselves upon 
current events, preparations arc under way or are under core 
Sideration for the largest expenditures fur war preparedness in 
any one year in the history of the world. Mr. Knox selected the 
wrong time to talk about arbitrating the very things that cannot 
be arbitrated, including hiv own na tion, which is bending its eneil 



gies to make still more complete preparedness to give battle to 
whoever wishes to enter a contest of arms with us. It is not 
now a question of right or wrong. The masses in every country 
are thoroughly imbued with the spirit of the pride of prowess, 
and every nation views its lighting ability with pride, and the 
rulers of all nations see that the masses are behind them, approv- 
ing plans for more warships and greater armies, and the admin- 
istration of the world's greatest republic, where peace and good 
will to men should be the dominant thought, together with the 
people, are imbued with the same warlike spirit that is a-etuating 
Russia, Germany, France and all Asia to hasten preparations 
fur the coming of the fatal day when the roar of artillery and 
the groans of wounded men shall he heard in valley and upon 
mountain top. 

No. Secretary Knox's scnlimentalism finds no market in all 
the world, and it is discredited in his own country. 



The suggestion of our State De- 
As to 'rut; Open DOOR, partment that the Manchurian rail- 
roads be neutralized, finds no favor 
with the nations most in interest. Such an agreement would be 
fatal to the commercial and war plans of Japan, and quite as 
much so to Russia. Japan's future greatness ami national safety 
depends almost entirely on becoming the dominant influence in 
Manchuria, nor does she have to lie told that sooner or later she 
and Russia will have to combat for the mastery. The one quite 
as much as the other is preparing for that day. In time, how- 
ever, China will be able to assert her rights in and title to Man- 
churia, but meanwhile she will, as she is now doing, labor to 
develop her vast material resources and war strength. It would 
be foolish to suppose 4-10,000,000 people are always to stand 
still and take blow after blow without the thought of ever strik- 
ing back. It is enough for the United States to know that our 
famous and toplofty demand for the "open door" policy in Man- 
churia has been denied, and that if Asia has got anything we 
want, we shall have to fight for it, commercially or with guns. 



Zelaya has reasonable prospects of 
Of General Interest. getting back to his own country. The 
revolutionists are gaining ground, 
and they are as likely as not to make terms with him and his 
following on the basis of peace and the uniting of their forces 
with an entirely new set of men to officer the Government. Such 
a move is hinted at as the first step toward forming a union of 
the Central American States, but not a federation, for mutual 
protection rather. 

Canada is entering with a will into her offer to contribute a 
given number of warships to the British navy. 

Spain is in a great commotion because a plot has been dis- 
covered in army circles to overthrow the Government, but the 
nation as a whole is too much wedded to the monarchical theory 
of Government to want a change: besides, the history of Cuba 
and the Latin-American republics is not such as to commend such 
a scheme as a few army officers have concocted to the masses 
of Spain. 

Prance is still troubled with the airship craze, and if money 
and energy will demonstrate that a navy to plow the air carrying 
armaments is better than one plowing the seas, she will know 
all the facts very soon. 

Germany is the quietest of the nations, but warship building 
and army munitions accumulation goes on with unabated 
energy. 



-One way to flatter a woman is to tell her that you can't. 




CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



Incomparably better than any other in its class. 
A Little Lower Priced Than the Others. 

Ben]. Curtaz & Son 

113-117 Kearny Street near Post 



January 22. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



NEPENTHE. 

The fire luis died and the coals are thill ; the sands from (he glass 

have run: 
The sunshine fades in the tear-dimmed dusk; the day of our love 

is done. 
Our hearts still ache in their emptiness and cry for the days now 

fled. 
Our lips still quiver in tenderness for the dreams that are dear 

and dead. 
We had our love in its sweet content, the hours, the days, the 

years ; 
We laughed at life in our joy of it, with laughter akin to tears. 

We knew the clasp of a tender hand, the glance of the eyes that 

told 
The things our lips could not hope to speak — a tale that was new 

yet old. 
We live our life in its fulsomeness, and what should the heart 

forget ? 
We loved and lost, and the fire has died ; but why should the heart 

regret ? 
We dreamed our dreams in a paradise — and what, if the night is 

gray? 
We drank the cup of our perfect joy. Dear heart, we have lived 

our day! 

— Caroline. Reunohls in Smart Set. 



POINTED PARAGRAPHS. 

Do it now, or be done. 

The Thanksgiving turkey is an aeroplane. 

It is human nature to act inhumanly occasionally. 

The real booklover is usually the one who writes it. 

Mixed drinks are responsible for a lot of mixed ideas. 

The very best way to get on in life is to get a move on. 

How many men do you know who do just as they please? 

There are lots of great men — until you get close to them. 

Does any one really understand you ? I ><> you understand 

yourself? 

A talkative man is apt to he as good natured as he is 

foolish. 

When a man buys groceries he likes to begin at the cigar 

ease. 

Give a boaster a chance In make good and watch him fade 

away. 

A man should he proud to earn his own living if he is 

li\ ing light. 

Nobody will ever see your little joke in quite tl" 

way you see it. 

There is many a slip between the I'riiii siand and the 

railroad station. 

If your friends give vmi away, tbev musl regard you as 

being pretty cheap. 

A great talker may not he a tool, Inn peopli K ■ 

all he says are. foolish. 

Patrick Cassidy, the Boston "literary hackman," 

estate of $3063. There are Iota of literary hack-men who can't 
match that. 

He — 1 wouldn't marry a girl who put on false bail! 

She — And 1 wouldn't marry a man who put on a false from ' — 

Exchange, 



whiles' Restaurant, now located at 388 Bush street, has 



secured permanent quarters in the Uonadnock Building. The 

new location is an ideal one. as this cafe is well and popularly 
known bj the patrons of restaurants. I.uneh will he served as 
and dinners in the evening with wine. An orchestra wdl 
entertain the patrons every evening, doles was the tirst 
rant to locate in the burnt distrut after the tire of 1 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco. 920 Merchants' 

Exchange Ruilding, calls the attention of the public to their 
Free Labor Bureaus, located at No. 170 Turk street, San Fran- 



SIIE. 
A sunny sparkle in a pool, 
A mist that's dawn across the stars, 

Her eyes. 
A touch of vapor and of fire, 

A humming bird that sips 
The torrid teardrops from the rose, 

Her lips. 
A garden filled with fadeless flowers, 

Where lilies bloom apart — 
The wonder is that garden's mine — 

Her heart. 

— J. C. Gerndt, m tin 1 Smart Set. 



It is safe to say that Dr. Cook will never again engage in 

the discovering business. 



VICTOR 

Talking Machine 

is the 

Musical Instrument For Everybody 

Victors - $10to$60 Victrolas - $125to$200 

Easy Terms 

Sherman Kay & Go. 

Steinway and Other Pianos. 

Player Pianos of All Grades Victor Talking Machines 

KEARNY AND SUTTER STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO 

FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS. OAKLAND 



In Buying Eggs 

its quality NOT AGE that counts. And likewise in selecting a 
business school. Individual instruction, and special attention 
paid to backward students. 

If you really mean business— join ue. 

Berkeley Business College 

and 



Coaching School 



Center and Shattuck. Berkeley. Cal. 



Z. P. SMITH. Prea. 



A. W. BeSl 



Alice Beat 



Best's Art School 



1626 Buah Street 



Life Cla 

Day and Night 



Illustrating 
Sketching 
Painting 




riMMK DoagUi MB 



R. Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 

SI LICK flta oflSaflrr. t t l»i « « torn ••* Moaifovn 



IT IS IGNORANCE THAT WASTES 
EFFORT." TRAINED SERVANTS USE 

SAPOLIO 

Gouraud's Oriental Beauty Leaves 

A dainty little booklet or exquisitely perfumed powdered leaves to 



„j Ort • t> nil ini ^ i » i # ** u»iniy uiue Dooaiei oi exquisitely penumea powaerea invei 10 

CISCO, and bU4 Hroadwav, Oakland. All Classes Of male help fur- carry In the purae. A handy article for all occaalona to quickly Im- 

nished absolutely free both to employer and employee. HopWnif'tr oSawon.. « n V°T. t C """ ta """"" "' """' T ' 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



.Taxuaey 22, 1910. 




Rehabilitated 

TliUST ('(IMI'AN KS. 



The fact that the Knickerbocker 
Trust Company of New York, which 
failed in what see I 1" be a hope- 
less manner during the panic of 

1907, has sine reorganized and is now in a stronger position 
than it was three years ago, is eloquent evidence of what can 
he done with the California Sale Deposit ami Trusl Company, 
of this city, if the stockholders and depositors of the suspended 
company will heed the advice of Walter J. Bartnett and take 
part in the reorganization scheme proposed by him. 

The $1,000,000 of new cash capital promised by New York 
financiers some months ago is still ready to be devoted lo the 
rehabilitation of the California Safe Deposit and Trust Com- 
pany as soon as California puts up the other $1,000,000 required 
under the terms of the reorganization. Under these terms, the 
reorganized company will have a total capitalization of $."..imhi.- 
ooo' the $3,000,000' of unpaid-up stock being kept in the treas- 
ury, I" be sold and the proceeds applied as needed for the con- 
dud of the future business. 

Mr. Bartnett writes from New York, under recent date, that 
the NVw York capitalists are evincing some impatience at the de- 
lay of the Californians to produce their share of the paid-up 
capital. New York capital does not have to wait long for in- 
vestment, and unless the balance of the paid-up capita] is not 
soon subscribed, it is possible that the New Yorkers will place 
their money elsewhere, despite their confidence in the strength 
of the reorganized company. 

"By your subscription to the stock," says Mr. Bartnett in his 
letter, "you will enable the reorganization to be effected and 
will accomplish the following: 

"1. You will have a security for which you paid $100 per share 
worth in a }'ear $150 per share, and worth in at most three years 
about $200 per share. Besides this, you will receive large divi- 
dends in the course of time. 

"2. Instead of the assets being sold at destructive figures, some 
will be sold at good prices, ami others will he financed in ordei 
to bring them to their highest efficiency. 

"3. There will be no depositors' suits, for these will be settled ; 
hence you will be spared litigation, with its annoyance ami ex- 
pense. 

"4. If you are a depositor you will get 25 per cent cash, 25 
per cent preferred stock in a holding company, and ~>^ per cent 
in certificates of deposit which will he retired at the rate "l 20 
per cent per annum. 

"5. You will witness the receiver and his assistants stepping 
down and out and the bank properties turned over lo a capable 
Board of Directors. The bank and its industrial assets will be 
filled with life, and the returns from these properties will sur- 
prise many. Your share in this will in time more than recoup 
youT losses, if you subscribe liberally to the- new stock. 

"All the stockholders should realize that the business of ihe 
reorganized Trust Company will not be of the prospective sort, 
that the new company will secure new business from the start, and 
that the coming to California of these powerful interests is a 
premeditated action founded upon large plans the soundness of 
which cannot be questioned." 

The showing of the company's res 'ces, which at once ap- 
pealed to the conservative Eastern financiers, is assuredly a 
strong one. 

After the first payment of 25 per cent, is made to depositors, 
and after reserving the bank premises at the corner of ( lalifornid 
and Montgomery streets to meet preferred claims, there will he 
only $4,250,000 of liabilities to depositors. The cash on hand 
will aggregate about $750,000. There will thus be left only 
$3,500,000 of liabilities to depositors, after deducting cash on 
hand, with no payment to be made the depositors for virtually 
two years, for the $750,000 cash on hand will meet, practically, 
the first payment in one year. The 4-1,500 shares of \\ ■ irn 
Pacific stock owned by the hank will «ell within two or three 
years of the date of reopening for $2,500,000. And out of the 
$3,500,000 of loans, there will be collected during three years 



over $2,000,000. Out of Ihe bonds, of the par value of $706,000, 
there will be collected within three years over $500,000. From 
ihe Great Western Power investment, real estate taken for debt, 
and miscellaneous items there will be collected within three years 
$250,000. There will thus he received or collected within three 
years from the assets $5,250,000, whereas the liabilities (o be met 
are only $3,500,000. There will thus be left $1,750,000 for the 
capital stock, and in addition the company will own a large 
amount of uncollected loans and miscellaneous assets not dis- 
posed of and the common stock of the holding company, whose 

lie o should amount to fully $150,000 per year and the stock 

itself he worth $1,500,000. 



Merchant Marine 
League. 



The 'Merchant Marine League re- 
ports growing interest in its aims 
throughout the country. In view 
of the desperate struggles that the 
few remaining American steamship lines have had to make 
against adverse conditions during the past few decades, their 
patriotic persistence has been conceded to be admirable and there 
is a marked disposition to grant them tin- proper compensation 
for carrying the mails and performing other duties of advantage 
lo the whole country. It must lie borne in mind by the friends 
of ,i subsidy, or a subvention, or whatever they choose to call it, 
that it must be made a substantial one, else it will be only partly 
i lie, tive. The cost of running an American ship is greater than 
the cost of running any foreign ship, ami it will remain so, as 
long as the American people require American ships to be offi- 
ecrcil and manned by Americans, or at least liy those demanding 
American standards of wages and rations. The amount saved 
by a British ship with a Lascar or Chinese crew, for example, is 
greater than the amount of the bounty or subsidy. It is against 
this low cost of running that, the American shipowner must 
contend. The coolie labor of Japan, tic- Lascar and Chinese of 
Great Britain, and the low-priced labor of other foreign coun- 
tries, combine to make the lot of the American shipowner a hard 
one. The encouragement given to him by the Government should 
be regulated to meet these conditions. 



E. F. Hutton & Co. 

490 California Street 

Telephone Douglas 2487 

and ST. FRANCIS HOTEL 

Telephone Douglas 3982 

Members New York Stock Exchange. Pioneer House 
Private wire to Chicago and New York. 

R. E. MULCAHY, Manager. 



Private Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

( New York Stock Exchange 
Member \ Chicago Board of Trade 

(. Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 
Mills Bide. 

TaL Kearny 482 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Aneelee 



Branch Office: Palace Hotel 



JANUARY INVESTMENTS 

Before converting your S. P. of ARIZ. 6 per cent 1910 send for 
our list of 



BOND OFFERINGS 



SUTRO & CO. 



412 Montgomery Street 



San Francisco 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address, 812-814 
Claus Spreckels Bide. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyrights, Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS fcXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 



January 99, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



]!> 



The appointment of Mr. W, J. Shot- 
Wi-.u.-lvvHxnn Promotion, well, a director of the Western 

Pacific Railway, and hitherto local 
general agent of the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad, to the 
post of assistant to Vice-President T. M. Schumacher, of the 
Western Pacific, was a deserved promotion for a tried and com- 
petent official. Mr. Shotwell has been a railroad man practically 
all of his life. He was for twenty-two years with the Denver and 
Uio Grande, rising from a minor clerkship, by sheer ability, to 
the post of general agent. He has also seen service with the Wa- 
bash, the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe and the Missouri Pacific 
roads. Owing to his popularity, Mr. Shotwell is receiving con- 
gratulations from all sides, both in and out of railroad circles. 
He has already assumed his new duties. 



State Bank Commissioner Alden Anderson made a most 

important ruling the other clay, and one that will strongly in- 
fluence the California oil market, when he declared that the 
stocks and bonds of the Associated Oil Company, the Standard 
Oil Company of California and the Union Oil Company of Cali- 
fornia are proper collateral upon which State savings banks may 
loan their funds. These securities are now classed as industrial, 
instead of mining stocks. Other oil companies are now bestirring 
themselves with a view of getting similar favorable rating. 



— The increase in the consumption of oil, now that the com- 
plete figures are in, is shown to be in excess of 99,000 barrels. 
This is the highest figure ever reached in California, and the 
September. preceding was the highest to that dale. The increase 
is not because of any great increase of the output in any "lie field, 
but was because of a general increase of demand and consump- 
tion from every source of distribution. 



Despite the result of the water bond election on January 

14th, Spring Valley Water stock did not drop excessively in 
value. The extreme fall was about 10 points, from 5iy 2 to II ' -_.. 
There were several recoveries between the adverse events and 
the last quotations in the stork. There is good reason for the 
strength of these securities, in the face of what most people 
thought would cause a great slump in prices. In the first place, 
it will be probably ten years before the Heteh Hetchy reservoirs 
and conduits are ready for operation ; to install an adequate sys- 
tem of local delivery in the city will probably take as long again, 
giving, say, 15 to 90 years for Spring Valley still to serve the 
people of San Francisco. This, too, is without considering the 
possibility of San Francisco having ultimately to buy the Spring 
Valley plant, notwithstanding their recent refusal to do so. 



There have been persistent rumors of "something doing" 

in Associated Oil, in spite of recent declines in the price of that 
stock. Just what the nature of the predicted happening will be 
is not to be ascertained with any accuracy. At any rate, know- 
ing ones are buying it now at low prices, in confident anticipa- 
tion of an early and decided rise. 



The market for industrials on the local stock and bond 

exchange has been active during the week, with prices, generally 
speaking, firm. Money, however is rather tight just at present. 
Bank clearings show large increases over the clearings for this 
time last year. 



Taft's enemies are trying to make the country believe that 

he would not accept another term in the White House if it were 
tendered to him by the unanimous vote of the nation's popula- 
tion. Such talk is idiotic. 



January 




Japan Number ■- - - Profusely Illustrated 

NOTE THE CONTENTS: 

FRONTISPIECE ■THE PAGODA AT HORYPJI" 1 

FRONTISPIECE "PRESIDENT 'I A I 2 

FRONTISPIECE "EMPEROR OF JAPAN" 3 

FRONTISPIECE "PRINCE I 4 

THE KID'S CHRISTMAS. Story CLARA MARTIN PARTRIDGE 6 

ONO-NO-KOMACHI. THE JAPANESE POETESS. MA1-A.ME fUKIO tiSAKI I 

Illustrated will (lis. 
PRINCE HIROBUNI ITO BY AN AI'MIRER 21 

Illustrated with PhotOgl 
TOKYO - C. E. FERGUSON 27 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
THE POLITICAL RELATIONS OF JAPAN AND 

AMERICA COITNT F. HAYASHI 41 

Illustrated with Photograph. 
HOW TO SEE JAPAN DR. J. INGRAM BRYAN 45 

Illustrated with PI 
MODERN EDUCATION IN JAPAN .... COUNT SHIGENOBU OKCMA S3 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
MEN WHO ARE MAKING JAPAN C. E. FERGUSON. K 

Finance. Financiers and Banks. 

Illustrated wit phs. 

THE SPREAD OF BUSINESS IN JAPAN AND 

AMERICAS SHARE OF IT E. Q. BABBITT 71 

Illustrated with V 
PEARLS OF GREAT PRICE K. MIKIMOTO S3 

illustrated with Photographs. 
YOKOHAMA. THE GREAT PORT OF JAPAN C. E. FKRGI 84 

Illustrated with Photographs* 
THE HOUSE OF MITSUI PIERRE N. BERINGER *•» 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
THE RAILROADS OF JAPAN BARON GOTO K 

Illustrated with Photographs. 
FROM WEST TO EAST CLARENCE E FERG1 - 99 

niustrated with 1 
THE HOTELS OF JAPAN 1 " 

Illustrated with F 
THE PAST AND THE PRESENT OF JAPAN'S 

EMIGRATION POLICY HENRY SATOH 108 

KOBE 110 

Illustrated with T 
AMBASSADOR O'BRIEN PIERRE N. BERINGER 115 

Illustrated with 1 
PROMINENT PERSONALITIES 121 

Illustrated with Fhotoeraphs 
THE DIVINE PROGRAM. C. T. RUSSELI. li« 

XII. The Great Day of His Wrath. 



15 Cents Per Copy 



$1.50 per year 



■20 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januaky 22, 1010. 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California, 



Cash Capital, MOO, 000. Cash Assets, $900,000 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability. General Liability. Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels. Automobiles. Burglary, Plate Glass. Personal Acci- 
dents Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man. F. P. Deering. E. F. Green. James K. Moffltt. J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld. Adolph A. Son. William S. Tevis. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for , California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Tire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. 

Cash Capital 51,000,000 

Cash Assets 6,956,216 

Surplus to Policyholders 2,790,360 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 

OF LIVERPOOL. 

Capital J6.700.000 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
360 California Street San Francisco. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid Insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of policy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K. Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 




Sign of the 
Pacific Mutual of California 



"Men of California" keep the 
premiums paid for your Acci- 
dent Insurance "in Cali- 
fornia" where the investment 
will add to your prosperity. 

The best Accident and Dis- 
ability Contracts ever issued 
in the world are being writ- 
ten by the 

Pacific Mutual of California 

Agency of F. A. STEARNS 

Manager Accident Department, 

501-502 Shreve Building 

Phone Douglas 240 San Francisco 




INSVMCB 




The Car] A. EOenry Company genera] agency lias appointed 
.Tames II. Kcnna a special agent 1" look after the interests of the 
Sun Insurance office, Michigan Fire and Marine, and the Sun 
Insurance Company of New Orleans in the baj counties. Mr. 
Kenna has been in the San Francisco Department of the Pacific 

Department, and has been with the firm for manv years. 

* * + 

Manager fames Wyper lias appointed Volney Seebeck to suc- 
ceed o. i;. Imlahl as special agenl for the London and Lancashire, 
and Orient, in Eastern Oregon. Idaho and Montana. Mr. See- 
beck has been in the employ of the Underwriters' Equitable Bat- 
ing Bureau of Oregon since the organization of thai body, and 
was formerly with the Board of Fire Underwriters as an in- 
spector, lie is well known in the Northwest field. The appoint- 
ment took effect on the 15th instant. 

* * * 

The lirst annual meeting of the Field Club, composed of the 
field men of Northern California, was held on January 1". 1910. 
F. P. Wilson, vice-president, presided, and forty-eight members 
were in attendance. In Mr. Wilson's address, reference was 

made to the deaths during the year of Director C. O. Scull and 
President Amos F. Sewell. The secretary reported a member- 
ship of 63, and (i additional members were elected at this meet- 
ing. F. P. Wilson. Guy Francis. W. O. Morgan. C. W. Dearborn, 
A, ('. Thornton. H. H. Boundtree and George C. Codding were 
elected director to serve during the ensuing year, and they after- 
ward met and elected the following officers: President, F. P. 
Wilson; vice-president. Guy Francis; secretary ami treasurer, 

George C. Codding. 

* * * 

The International Casualty Company of Spokane, which was 
incorporated under the laws of the State of Washington, with a 
capital stuck of $300,000 a few weeks ago, will increase it- capital 
to $1,000,000 at a meeting of the temporary officers on Man!) 
10th. The company will do a general casualty insurance busiue--. 
specializing in automobile insurance. Fire and life risks will nut 

he written. 

The officers are: President. Charles P. Ritter; firs! rice-presi- 
dent, F. E. Goodall; second vice-president, R. D. Miller; third 
vice-president, John W. Graham; secretary, C. I'. Lindsley; au- 
ditor, II. A. Flood; treasurer, E. F. Waggoner; general counsel, 
F. W. Dewart; medical director, Dr. G. K. McDowell. 

The directors expect to interest sullf a an capita] in Spokane 
to insure local domination. Already a large number of Spokane 
capitalists have subscribed, rad il is announce, I thai prominent 
local and Northwestern business and professional men will become 
stockholders in the near future. In addition to the Northwestern 
capitalists, insurance men from all parts of the United Slates 
are being interested in the concern. Several New York and 

Illinois insurance capitalists have subscribed for -lock. 

* * * 

l.o. Anucle- capitalists are determined to organize a local lire 

insurance company, and among those uueresicd are A. A. Allen. 
Presideni of the local hoard; W. A. Bonynge, presideni of the 

C lercial National Bank: Mr. II. Faust, an insurance man. 

and Robert Marsh, a real estate agent. I; has been decided to 
raise half a million by subscription before fixing the amount of 
capital stock and -in-plus. This proposition has no connection 
with the many similar attempts made during the past year to 
organize a Los Angeles lire insurance company. 

* * * 

Seely & Co. have removed from Tacoma to Seattle, and have 
secured the general agency tor Washington for the Western and 
Atlantic id' Nashville, having become purchasers of a block of 
capital stock. Manager J. F. Cobb, of San Francisco, who has 
the Dixie Fire Insurance C pany. will have the agency of the 

Western and Atlantic for ( lalifornia. 

* * * 

The Calumet Fire Insurance Company of Chicago, which re- 
cently entered (he Slates of Utah and Idaho, through tic Salt 

Lake general agency, of Heber .1. Grant & Co., has been admitted 



Jantjaei 



1910. 



and California Advertiser 



81 



to full membership in the Board of Fire Underwriters of the 
Pacific, which has jurisdiction over the above Slates, as well as 
those included in all other territory west of the Rocky Mountains. 

* * * 

W. W. Hutchinson, who has for the past two years been an in- 
dependent adjuster at Fresno, Cal., died suddenly last week from 
apoplexy. Mr. Hutchinson was formerly Pacific Coast manager 
for the Northwestern National, of Milwaukee, with headquarters 
in San Francisco. Prior to that time he had been special agent 
for the company, covering Oregon and Washington. 

,M. A. Newell, one of the best-known underwriters, both lire 
and marine, of San Franeiseo. has loeated in Portland, Oregon, 
and is acting as financial agent of several large California cor- 
porations. Mr. Newell was for years president of the California 
Insurance Company. o 

* * * 

The past year was a profitable one for the fire insurance com- 
panies doing business in Oregon. Reference to Oregon largely 
means Portland, for the bulk of the premiums collected in the 
State came from that city. There have been no conflagrations 
and only one large fire of importance, and that the burning of 
the Portland Flouring Mill. The low loss ratio upon a reduced 

income is especially gratifying. 

* * * 

J. E. Yontz, promoter of the Rankers' Fire Insurance Com- 
pany, of Los Angeles, which is chartered under the laws of Ari- 
zona, advises us I ha I the company is now writing insurance, al- 
though no informal ion is given of the financial status of its 
affairs. The company has made no efi'ori to secure a California 
license, which leads to a suspicion that ils finances are 111 >i on 
a high level. 

* * * 

Robert Dickson, the indomitable San Franciscan, former presi- 
dent of the Southern of New Orleans ami the Guardian id' Pitts- 
burg, now in fhe hands of receivers, and lately connected with (he 
German Union of Baltimore, now in process of liquidation, lias 
purchased the charter of the Isthmus Lloyds of New York, from 
Cortland I'. Hull, Jr. The price is ma given, inn i! i- stated to 

lie somewhere between $10,000 and $-.'n. iiimi. 

* * * 

The announcement thai a cement manufacturer of Kansas 

City has taken $1,500,000 naiu-e in addition to the 

$1,000,000 which he alread] bad, Buggests thai there is a limit 
in the amoiini of insurance which a man should be allowed to 
fake, and thai possibbi -nine of the companies are not careful 

enough in this particular. If is doubtful whether there is an 

insurance interest in any man's life to the extent of two and a 
half millions of dollars, ami ii is i" be seriously questioned 
whether the experience of the companies in lives insured for 
large amounts is a favorable one. The mere fact, publicly 

known, thai a man is insured f"r two and a half millions, would 
constitute an additional hazard to thai man's life. 

* • • 

Edward Brofl n & ^ons. of San Frani i-. ". have bei n appointed 

general agents lor the Pacific ' ie Hamilton Fire In- 

surance Company, which was recently re-entered in the field by 
R. C. Jameson, of Jameson iS Frelinghuysen. I _ lefirm 

five responsible compai 

* • • 

Unusual preparations are being made for the forth-coming 
meeting oi S Underwriters isso 

which takes place at the Si. Francis Ho el on the last Saturday 
in January. The president of the National Associal on 
present, and business ,,f unusual interest will ho transai ted, in- 
cluding the fixing of the officers for the ensuing 
ciation is in a highly prosperous condition. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently loeated at Post and Powell 

streets: also at Fairmont Hotel. 



The Home insurance Company, New York 






Cash Capital. J3.O00.0O0 



Insurance on personal effects of tourists and temporary sojourners 
anywhere in United States. Canada and Mexico. Insurance against lose 
by Are. Automobile Insurance. Indemnity tor loss of rental income by 
Are. 
H I ROFF. General Agent J. J. SHKAHAN. Asa't General Agent 

324 Sansome Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Mardi Gras 
Excursion 



Personally conducted to the great festival city, New 
Orleans, leaves San Francisco 



January 29th, 1910 



ROUND 
TRIP 



$67.50 



Tickets good for thirty days' trip, via the famous 
ocean to gulf line. 



Sunset Route 



One hundred mile ride along the ocean shores of the 
Pacific. Through Southern California orange groves, 
the rice, cotton and sugar fields of Texas and Louisi- 
ana. Picturesque bayous, the Teche, Land of Evan- 
geline. 



Oil burning locomotives. 
No soot - No cinders. 



Through drawing-room sleepers, berths, sections, 
drawing-rooms, dining, parlor and observation car 
service. Steam heated and electric lighted through- 
out. 

Ten days' stopover at New Orleans on all first-class 
tickets reading to points East. 

Through tourist car service to New Orleans, Wash- 
ington, Cincinnati, St. Louis and Chicago. 

■Write for our beautifully illustrated booklet, "'Win- 
ter in New Orleans." Tells in detail of the attractions 
of the Crescent City and the wonders of the Mardi 
Gras. 



Southern Pacific 



Ticket Offices: 
FLOOD BUILDING MARKET ST. FERRY DEPOT 

THIRD AND TOWNSEND STS. DEPOT 
BROADWAY AND THIRTEENTH ST., OAKLAND 



23 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januarv 32, 1910. 




MOWMl 



s^-^^a»Ki- 



3 



Oakland, Automobile Show. 

Oakland has again made a hit among the automobile enthu- 
siasts by giving them one of the best automobile Bhows that this 
section of the country has seen for quite a while. Hundreds of 
enthusiasts from all the bay cities attended the opening on 
Monday, January 17th. The big time commenced with ;m auto- 
mobile parade, which started through Oakland's principal streets 
at 7:30, finishing at the entrance to the Piedmonl Pavilion, 
where the dffors were swung open to admit the hundreds of 
boosters who were there to assist in making the First Annual 
Automobile Show of Oakland a success. Many of l lie San Fran- 
cisco firms who are not represented on (he other side of the bay 
had secured space and aided the Oakland dealers greatly in their 
exhibit. All the latest models of 1910 motor ears are to be seen 
at this exhibition, and many improvements of kith construction 
and design of the various makes are prominent. Over two hun- 
dred automobiles were exhibited on the floor. Mayor .Frank Mott 
of Oakland, President. Clay of the Chamber of Commerce, and 
many other prominent business men of Oakland, were among the 
speakers on the opening night. The program for the week was 
as follows: 

Monday, January 17th, Chamber of Commerce Night. 

Tuesday, January 18th, Ladies' Night. 

Wednesday, January 19th, Automobile Trade. Night. 

Thursday, January 20th, Society Night. 

Friday, January 21st, Country Club Night. 

Saturday, January 22d, San Francisco Night. 

Sunday, January 23d, Closing Night. 

The great success of the Oakland show is in part due to the 
"pull together" spirit of the Oakland merchants, and the great 
interest taken in Oakland by the general public in all affairs per- 
taining to the automobile. This has been proven several times 
across the bay, especially during the Emeryville and Portola 
nice meets. On these occasions, the automobile brought the city 
of Oakland prominently before hundreds of thousands of people 
throughout the country. Following is a list of exhibitor- ; 

W. L. Loos & Co., represent in"; Marion. Stoddard-Dayton, 
Reo; Pullman Automobile Co., Pullman; Hugo Muller Auto 
Co., Moliiio. Premier; Auburn Auto Agency, Auburn; Maxwell 
Auto Agency, Maxwell ; Reliance Auto Co., Knox ; Palmer-Singer 
Auto Co., Palmer-Singer, Santos Dumont and Clement Aero- 
plane; Locomobile Auto Agency, Locomobile; Jones Automobile 
Co., Regal; Studebaker Bros. Co., Studebaker-Garford, Stude- 
baker E. M. F., Studebaker Flanders, Studebaker Electric; El- 
more Auto Agency, Elmore; Western Electric Vehicle Co., Kis- 
sel Kar, Detroit Electric, Waverley Electric; MeDougal Mfg. 
Co., E. and L. Electric: Bay Cities Electric Co., Columbus Elec- 
tric; Haynes Auto Sales Co., Haynes; Tallman & Slephenson, 
Overland, Sunset; IT. 0. Harrison Co.. Peerless, Kverill. Seidell ; 
RambleT Auto Agency, Rambler; Oldsmobile Agency, Dldsmo- 
bile; Buick Agency, Buick ; Pacific Motor Car Co., Stevens Dur- 
yea, Wood's Electric: S. G. Chapman, Oakland. Hupmobili ' 
solidated Motor Car Co., Pope-Hartford; Pioneer Automobile 
Co., Thomas Flyer, Chalmers-Detroit, Hudson Twenty, Randolph 
Truck, Babcock Electric; Cartercar Agency, Cartercar; The 
White Company, White Steam Car. White Gasoline Car; John 
A. Bunting, Jr., Franklin: Corbin Auto Agen I lorbin. 

* * * 
The Aviation Meet at Los Angeles. 

The meet of aviators and dirigible balloonatics at Los Angeles 

has been a great success. Understand, this [uesl of the hot 

air that vibrates over the capital of tl range growers' couninj 

was arranged primarily as an advertisement for (be City of 
Angels. It is one big success; in point of attendance and in 
point of record smashing. We may, as a result, see the whole 
of Van Xess Avenue taken up with the new industry. You will 
find aviarys everywhere, and soon the citizen who lives across ilie 
bay or down the peninsula will enter his car, on Market street, 
from the top story of one of our big office buildings, and alight 



within the half hour at Burlingame or Piedmont in time for 
dinner. 

It is not claimed, as yet, that the heavier-than-air machines 
are ever destined to carry ponderous packages or weights, so the 
chauffeur will bring up the rear, with the bundles and impedi- 
menta, thai seems part and parcel of the daily routine of life of 
the suburbanite, in a dirigible. 

It is said that the aviation meet course at Los Angeles has at- 
tracted a vast number of people all week, and that more than 
two thousand automobiles, ranging from an antiquated one- 
I linger to the eight-cylinder of the most modern construction, 
were in the concourse. From twelve to fifteen thousand people 
passed through the gates daily. 

One of the Wright Brothers is quoted as saying that such ex- 
hibitions were useless, and that it was only the quiet worker who 
ever accomplished«anything, and. while it may be conceded that 
Mr. Wright is right, it must also lie- admitted that such an exhibi- 
tion as that made at Los Angeles certainly serves as a spur to the 
inventive. A number of heavier-than-air machines came out of 
hilling places, and hundreds of embryo Darius Greens found to 
their dismay that while their beautiful bird-like air conquerors 
would work well, in the shop and in a disconnected Slate, when 
brought out into the open they only served to make a great whirr 
and noise, and would not fly al all. The perfect heavier-than-air 

machine has as yet no! been designed, and (here are many de- 
fects to.be overcome still offending in the so-called successful 
machines. The aviation meel gives all a chance to compare 
frames, motors, planes and general construction, and one may 
easily prophecy that the impetus thus given will blossom out in 
California in the production of the only perfect machine yet de- 
vised. Envy, jealousy, rivalry, emulation, whatever you may 
ohoose to call it, is what has made the successful men and women 
of the world. The desire to overcome the genius of another, when 
matched with yours, is what has made the inventions of men 
practical and of every-day use. 

* * * 

Louis Paulhan Coming to San Francisco. 

Arrangements have been made for three days' exhibition at 
Tanforan Race Track, on Sunday, Monday and Tuesday at 2 
p. m., January 23d, 24th and 25th, 

* * • 

We shall look forward to the coming to San Francisco of the 
aviationisls and the aeronauts, and it may be safely said that 
we will have a still larger crowd in attendance here than al Los 
Angeles, bn1 to Los Angeles belongs all the glory of having, 
through unexampled enterprise and against all kind- of opposi- 
tion, pulled off the first Western aviation meet, successfully. 

* * * 

The wonderful performances by Ihe aviators at Los Angeles 
mil only demonstrated more strongly than ever the fact that 
aerial navigation is an accomplished fact, Iml they brought (his 
practical demonstration right to our own doors. After genera- 
tions of effort, with balloons and other lighter-than-air airships, 
man has proven his ability to fly in a manner not greatly unlike 
that of a bird. 

I'a u I h.in's achievement in rising to a height of 5,000 feet, or 
nearly a mile, in his Farman hi-plane, gives him Ihe honor of 
reaching the highest altitude yet recorded for a heavier-than-air 
living machine. The best previous records for this class of air- 
ship were those of Huberi Latham, at .Mourmelon, France. Janu- 
ary i. 1910, 3300 feet; Orville Wright, at Potsdam, Germany, 
Oct. ■.'. 1909, 1,600 feet, and of Paulhan himself, near Paris, 
France, in November L909, about 2,000 feet. 

Glenn It. Curtiss won the honors as the swiftest aerial naviga- 
tor, exceeding *0 miles an hour for a short distance. The 
career of his machine during its express train flight was as thrill- 
ing as the soaring of Paulhan a mile high in the sky. 

The Los Angeles aerial meet was brilliantly successful as an 
exhibition of modern aeronautics. All of the competitors did 
well, and the fact that two records were broken shows thai the 
Californian tournament was an epoch-marker. 

It is established beyond all doubt that perfectly controllable 
living machines not only can he made, but actually are made, to- 
day. It is the dawning of the age. of general aerial navigation. 

* * * 

Several of the big Eastern universities are said to he organ- 
izing aero clubs, with a view of adding aeronautics to the cur- 
riculum of college sports. 

"It is safer than football," observes Carl H. Carson, president 



Januahy 22, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



of the newly-organized aeronautic ehib of the University of Penn- 
sylvania. 

1 1 ia do( unlikely that aviation co'ntesta will be frequenl amoag 
college men in the near future. 

An interesting feature of the Los Angeles aeronautical meet 
was the flying of the Bleriot monoplane, the first of this type of 
aeroplane in this country, in which Paulhan unsuccessfully com- 
peted with Curtis for (he speed record. The Bleriot is a small 
machine, and as it carried its daring operator around the field, 
close to the ground, it gave many dramatic exhibitions, in the 
gus+s of wind that often made it turn and toss in a manner that 
elicited not a few screams from the more timid of the fair ones 
viewing the contests. 

* * * 

Schedule a Hill-Climb. 

A hill-climb is scheduled for Sunday, March 20, 1910. The 
date was fixed by the directors of the San Francisco Motor Club, 
at their last meeting, last week. The climb will take place on 
the Nineteenth Avenue Course, and it was selected because it is a 
most difficult hill to negotiate, and also because it is a course 
that may be viewed from many points of vantage. The directors 
have been in touch with the ground hog, the witch hazel wand 
man, the seers and seeresses of Market street, and the IT. S. 
Weather Bureau sharp, and they officially announce clear 
weather and sunshine for the day of the hill climb. 

The directors present at the meeting were II. M. Owens, II. L. 
Owesney, C. S. Richardson, S. G. Chapman, U. E. Starratt, B. 
.1. Marx and W. I!. Johnston. 

The arranging of the course was placed in the hands of a com- 
mittee, willi Tony Nichols as chairman. 

There is a decided advantage in the course in that it may be 

viewed from the stai't to the finish, and that all along tic 1 road 
id' hillocks of sand against which one may repose in entire com- 
fort. 

The Flag to Flag automobile contest, an international event 
for motor ears and motorcycles between Mexico ami the United 
States has taken on new ignificance. Instead id' being confined 
to one competition in an endurance contesl from Denver to tee 
City of Mexico there will he several varied events and the trophj 
list will be augmented. The Wahlgreen trophj will lie offered 
for the original contesl from Denver to the City of Mexico, which 
run will he modeled along the lines of the Glidden lour. There 
will be a Mexico-San Antonio race, shod endurance eo 
from Texas cities to San Lntonio, and probably a racing track 

program at San Antonio. 

* • • 

Among Hie iveenl sales reported by the Standard Motor Car 
Company arc: Arthur Sharman, of Sultana, Cal.; Smith & 

of Modesto. Cal. : Law reni e Water-, of Si. I [i |i D I, < 'al. : Ben L 

Brundage, of Bakersfield, < al. Also recenl pui 

cars aie: P, \ i allaghan, of WTateonviUe, Cal.; C. LI owe, ol 

Mountain View, Cal. 

* * • 

sting a 8 park i 
The tremblei on i • i ■ ■ coil may be adjusted by tirst remov- 
ing the spark plug, and, if the points are about 1-32 in. apart. 




C: now screw in the contact screw A until it just touches the 
platinum contact B on the vibrator spring. Star! tip the engine, 
and if it misses fire at all tighten up or screw in the contact 
screw a trifle at a time until the engine runs without missing 
explosions. If the carbureter is properly adjusted and the coil 
and wiring in good condition, it should now give a quick action 
and ample spark with the smallest possible consumption of battery 
energy. 

* * * 

Ttow in I 'lean Spark Plugs. 

The accompanying sketches show a very simple yet efficient 
method of cleaning spark plugs, and will be found very useful 
around an automobile garage. 




Take an ordinary porcelain wash-basin and cut a thin hoard to 

il a- shewn in the i : : loles in the 

to suit the size of the spark plugs to be 'leaned. Place 

the board in the pan. thru put the (dugs in the boles, sparking 




removing the vibrator 

: iron on the end of the 
about oue-sLxteenth of an inch from the core of th- 



ud down. Xow pour corn cut rated ammonia into the pan until 
il almost touches the board. Let it stand from 1"> mini 
one hour, then brush 'tf tooth-brush dipped 

uto the ammonia, and ft ! from 

them. If the plugs are rinsed in hoi aning they 

» ill dry much quicker. 

« * * 

Gifts On! 

Following the practice started go of dividing 

arnings among the emplo 
Company distributed last week the sum oi ! 

•ion for faithful se r all of this 

is distributed in Detroit. T 
• ited the starting of branch in 

' initoba, and in 
included in this pr :ne. 

The money is divided according fa A one 

year n r>er cent of his year's earnings, a two year man 

. ' ■_. per cent and a three year man 10 per cent. The total sum 

vided is about double the amount required a vear If 

• • « 

Bnre rait: of an 

e from t: 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 23, 10] 0. 



Features of the Portable Garage. 

Accompanying this article will be found several views of one of 
the portable garages now on the market. The plan shows that it 
is about 13 feet wide by 19 feet long inside. Of this, however, 
not all is available, some room being taken up by a large work- 
bench, a cupboard and other conveniences. These cut the avail- 
able floor space to about 12 feet by 16 feet, whirl) is very close 



I -**»' : 



[- 



•- •-■? -■■•""■ ■ • , 



I I 

Ji'f jfj 

B i 



■ ■■■ ' - ■■; ." . .■ . - 



• • P«L. 4 • 

FOUNDATION PLAN 




FLOOR PLAN OF GARAGE 



to the size arrived at in the. previous consideration of the least 
size that would accommodate a single car with any kind of 
comfort. 

There is a double door at the front, measuring 8 feet in width 
by 8 feet 6 inches in height. The latter is made large to allow of 
the ear entered with the top up, as it is a very disagreeable fea- 
ture to have to get out in the rain to fold the top back in order 
to be able to drive the car in. In addition, there is a small 
narrow side door for the owner's personal use. 

Two windows on each side, with two smaller ones at the back, 
furnish plenty of light, the back windows being grouped over 
the work bench. The foundation is more in the nature of a 
suggestion than a necessity. This is not furnished by the makers 
of the garage, the plan being given to enable the prospective 
buyer to provide a concrete or stone foundation. 




^& 




FFKJNT ELEVATION 



BIGHT SIDE ELEVATION, 




FH1 



B^ 



J u 




LEFT SIDE ELEVATION 



1EAR ELEVATION 



Another illustration shows a frame garage in process of con- 
struction. This, as may readily be seen, is just large enough 
for one car, has a single door at the front, this being of the 
double-hinged type. Then there are two windows on each side 
and one at the rear end. The door size is 8 feef wide by 8 feet 
6 inches high. The actual inside space in the clear is 12 feet by 
17 feet 6 inches. — Motor Age. 

Hold Mirror* for Auto Headlights. 

Tests which should be of great interest to every one owning or 
contemplating the purchase of automobiles have been made by the 
Royal Automobile Club of England, to find a substitute for the 



silver mirrors of headlights. 

The most important objection to the silvered mirror is the fact 
that in powerful headlights it makes a white, blinding glare that 
dazzles the drivers of approaching vehicles, often causing serious 
accident. 

On the other hand, mirrors coated with gold, instead of silver, 
throw a beam of light practically devoid of the blue and violet 
rays of the spectrum, being composed of red, yellow and green 
rays only. At the same time the range or penetrative power is 
claimed not to be reduced, and, by the elimination of the violet 
rays, the dazzling effect is reduced. 

It has always been taken for granted, according to an English 
magazine interested in the subject, that the whiter and more 
powerful the light, the more perfect the illumination, but this is 
by no means the case. The red and yellow rays are far less ab- 
sorbed by the atmosphere than the violet rays, which is well 
borne out by the penetrative power of gas and the electric arc in 
a fog, the latter being visible a shorter distance than the former. 

* * * 

H. 0. Harrison, agent for Peerless and Everitt cars in Cali- 
fornia, went to San Diego the early part of last week, to look over 
the situation in the automobile industry there. He found condi- 
tions flourishing, and decided to establish an agency for the 
Everitt line, the new low-priced ear which he has recently taken. 
Harrison was absent from San Francisco for a week, part of the 
time being spent in Los Angeles. 

The popular automobile dealer was the principal speaker at the 
meeting of the Licensed Automobile Dealers' Association. After 
Harrison's direct talk, the dealers decided to hold a show in the 
Hamburger building, and Harrison took 2,000 feet of floor 
space. The Peerless man must hurry East in order to get cars to 
Los Angeles in time for the show there. He will ship a carload 
of Everitt and Peerless cars by express at a cost of almost $3,000. 

The exhibit which Harrison expects to make will be one of the 
handsomest in the show. The late model Peerless cars exhibited 
at the Madison Square Garden show are to be sent to Chicago for 
the show there, and are then to be shipped by Harrison to Los 
Angeles for exhibition purposes. 

* * * 

The Los Angeles Licensed Dealers' Association has decided to 
hold the Pasadena-Altadena Hill Climb this year on Febnjary 
22d. In talking about this hill climb, Charles Howard, the 
head of the Howard Automobile Company, says that the Buiek 
line will be represented in every class. The little White Streak 
will be sent in on the small car class. The new Buiek "30" will 
be in the Intermediate class, and H owar 'l himself will go down 
to drive one of the "40" roadsters, a duplicate of the ear driven 
by Chevrolet in the East, and which has won during, this season, 
in open competition, 204 firsts, 64 seconds, and 33 thirds, one 
of the must remarkable records in the history of the automobile. 
Mr. Howard is confident that the Buicks will, as usual, give a 
guild account of themselves in the three different classes in which 

they will be entered. 

* * * 

In a sect inn of the country that is removed from rush anil tur- 
moil, and where intrinsic value received quick recognition, the 
Hydraulic and Spring-action Wind Shield were singled out. from 
among all others for exhibition purposes. Of the II cars ex- 
hibited at the Columbus, Ohio, Show, December ~">th to 31st, 
ten of them wen- equipped with these shields. Among the promi- 
nenl cars so titled were the Stearns, Mitchell, Ohio, Regal, 
Chalmers-Detroit and Cole. The remaining seven cars were 
equipped with shields of four different makes. 

The mechanical perfection and pleasing design of the Hydrau- 
lic and Spring-action Shields has won for them places on many 
high-class show cars. 

* * * 

A full set of "Nobby Treads" are on one of the Pope-Hart- 

I'urds in the automobile show. While Weinstock, Nichols & Co. 
have no space in the show, this exhibit of their "Nobby Treads" 
is attracting a great deal of attention. Nobby Treads give any 

car a classv appearance. 

* * * 

Eugene Bemb, of the Chalmers-] tetroit factory, who won a 
perfect score and the Detroit trophy in the Glidden tour, will 

be in Sacramento on the 31st. 

* * • 

The Havnes Auto Sales Company made two retail sales and 
one agency deal as a result of the first day's business at the show. 



January 82, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



Z5 



You Are Sure 



of the best of treatment, 

best of goods and most 

reasonable prices at 



Chanslor & Lyon Motor 
Supply Co., Inc. 

San Francisco — Seattle— Los Angeles 

Follow The Crowd 



Sometime, somewhere, someone MAY 
make an automobile the equal of the 

Buick 



But never will any-one, any-where, any- 
time produce a better one. 

The BUICK holds more worlds records than 

any other car on earth, regardless of price. 

Consider BUICK Quality, then look at BUICK 

price. 



Buick "White Streak" - $1150 

Buick-30 .... 1550 

Bulck-40 .... 1900 

Buick-50 7 passenger - . 2900 
All F. O. B. S. F. 

Get immediate deliveries now while you can. 



Howard Automobile Co. 



Pacific Coast Distributors 



523-533 Golden Gate Ave. 



Phones: Market 1536 
Home J 2313 




READR1TE Meters show the exatft 
condition of your batteries. 

We supply each instrument with a 
written GUARANTEE for ONE YEAR 
against inaccuracy, imperfect workman- 
ship or inferior material. 

PRICE LIST 



«- .1. 8 or 12 Volts 
0-30 Amps 



Voltmeters 

Ammeters 

Volt-Ammeters 



0-3 Volts 

0-8 Volts <Sttn. Range) 
0-10 Volts 



J 0-30 Amps. 



j 0-30 Amps. 



$3.00 
$2.50 

$3.50 
$4.00 




Cataract 

Auto-Vehicle 

Washer 

Will wash vehicles be- 
ween spokes, uoder 
fenders and all over. 



NO OTHER WASHER WILL DO IT. 



PRICE SI JO 



FOR WASHING— Automobiles. Carriages. Hacks. Delivery Wagons— In - fad. all 
vehicles that mu*l be kept clean. 



Little Wonder Vulcanizer 

The Little Wonder Vulcanizer made in all sizes to fit all makes of 
tires is the only small vulcanizer having detachable moulds which fit the 
tire from rim to rim perfectly. This feature prevails in large vulcanizers. 




This Vulcanitcr *ill repair Small Cuts. \nl 
outside casing, before (he cut has been in the tire. 




The Barco 

Chime Horn 



Price Complete 

With No. 5 or 6 valve $ 9.00 

• "8 rilre 9.50 

• " 10 vstre 12.50 



PACIFIC SALES CORPORATION 



EXCLUSIVE COAST DISTRIBUTORS 



SO Van Ness Ave., San Francisco 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 22, 1910. 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros., 246 W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dam» 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F. Road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE. Market and St. James 
streets. 20.000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE — San Jose Garage. 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgrs. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Buick and O'ds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE — Stop at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE — Lamolle Grill. 36-38 North First street. The best French 
dinner in California. 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROY, CAL. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVPLLE. — J. H. Covell Garage. " Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

PTEALDSBURG— HOTEL SOTOYOME. J. McDonough, Prop. Only first 
class hotel in the city. Electricity throughout. Free sample rooms. Hot 
and cold water in every room. Baths with suites. Special attention to 
auto parties. Phone Main 50. 



. I Xrn- Bumper. 

"Swivelaction" proves i" be the name of ;i cleverly constructed 

automobile I per manufactured by the Emit Grossman Com- 
pany, New York, which thej have just placed on the market. A 
model of 'this bumper was exhibited at the Atlanta Show. The 
trade was so deeply impressed with the "Swivelaction" that a 
number of ^(Mid-sized advance orders were booked. 

It is a departure from the conventional bar mounted on stiff 
springs, which, -up to the present, has been the general type of 
bumper. 

The bar is connected by two swivel joints to pivoted levers 
working in slotted sleeves against flexible spiral springs, giving 
soft and easy cushion. A blow on the full face of the bar is ab- 
sorbed in the springs, a glancing side blow (as delivered when 
turning a corner or in striking an obstruction with one end of 
the bar) is taken care of by the swivel joints, which oscillate 
through the force of the contact and carry the jar to the springs. 
Xo other bumper is so constructed or embodies these advantages. 

The manufacturers have decided on popular list prices so that 
owners need not consider the question of cost, and therefore they 
will be $12.50 for the black. $15 fur the brass, and $16 for the 
nickel finish. Liberal trade discounts arc also allowed. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
279 Valencia Street, 8a n Francisco. Telephone Market 1988 



THORPE'S 

ILLUSTRATED 

ROAD MAP ST0UR BOOK 

The only Map which shows actual 
PHOTOS of Forks.TurnssCross Roads 

ra nv THORPE ENGRAVING CO LA 



PACIFIC 

MOTOR SUPPLY 

COMPAN.Y 

Oakland, Calif. 
Northern Distributors 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
545 Van Ness Ave. Phone Market 5678. 



Vulcanizing 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6J70. 



42 V«n Nes» Avenue. 



8an Francisco, Cal. 



Phone Park 6544 



L. J. Carl, Manager 



Auto Top Manufacturing Co. 

Automobile and Carriage Trimmings 



San Francisco, Cal. 



491 Golden Gate Avenue 



Near Polk 



Ramblers in (he Coimtry. 

Figures just compiled for the State of Minnesota show that 
there are in use in that State six thousand two hundred and 
eighty-two automobiles. It is interesting to note that a rery 
large number of these curs have been purchased by residents of 
small towns. The compilation shows thai in towns of under one 
thousand population there are in use eleven hundred and sixty- 
nine automobiles, while in towns between ten and twenty-one 
thousand population there arc only two hundred and fifty-two 
automobiles. Among the best-known cars, the New Rambler 

leads all these within ! thousand dollars of its price in towns 

uniler one thousand population, as well as in towns under three 
thousand and live thousand population. 

In explanation of this superiority in numbers, Thomas B. 
Jeffery & Company have announced thai an agricultural imple- 
ment house in Minneapolis Bold in two months prior to Septem- 
ber 1, L909, two hundred Ramblers in that territory. 

* * * 

I ill,, I,, I Mr, 'I Hi, II, in, HI, I. 

In marked contrast i methods of several recently organ- 
ized automobile companies is the action of the Mitchell Motor 
Car Company of Racine, Wis., in declining to accept deposits for 
future deliveries from its agent -. 

_ James \Y. Gilson, Bales manager of that company, calls atfc a- 
tion to this fact, and the practice of the makers in accepting de- 
posits for cars that have no! I n built except on paper. 

"If the Mitchell Company were to accept these deposits with 
its output of something more than 6,000 cars." said Mr. Gilson, 

"ii might have the use of re than $300, on the basis of 

$50 a ear, for the greater pari of the year. The Mitchell Com- 
pany does ic! wish the deposits which generally are taken bj 
motor car manufacturers at the time the orders are given. It 
wants the agents to take the cars, and only as many as thej can 
absorb. The Mitchell Company finds it difficult to make the 
supply meet the demand." 




$850 



Full of Snap, Fire, 
Vim and Style 



JusT; a relative difference between the larger cars and the Hupmobile; that is, the difference in size 
quality. 

BEAR IN MIND THE PRICE-THEN STUDY THESE SPECIFICATIONS:- 
„,„„,,. SPECIFICATIONS: 

ENGINE-4eyl..20H.P..3 1-4 in. bore, 3 3-8 in. Stroke: L-head 

type; water cooled: offset crank-shaft. 
TRANSMISSION-Seledtive sliding Bears 
CLUTCH— Multiple disc type; self-ac'just.insr. 
REAR AXLE— Shaft drive; Hyatt roller and New Departure 

bearings. 
BRAKES— Two foot and two emergency (internal expanding on 



-not in 



IGNITION— Bosch high tension magneto. 

TIRES-30x3 inches. 

WHEEL BASE-86 inches. 

TREAD-56 inches. 

SPRINGS-Semi-elliptical front. 

EQUIPMENT— Two side and tail oil lamps, dragon horn, tools. 

repair kit. pump. 

WE1GHT-UOO pounds, regular equipment. 



Telephone Park 6475 



S. G. CHAPMAN 



324 Van Ness Ave. 



January 22, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



.1 New Tin' Gauge. 

One of the simplest, yet most useful, accessories exhibited a1 
the Automobile Show is the Ajax Air Gauge, a new device for 
testing the pressure of ail in tires. This little vest-pocket-size 
invention, which is hut four inches long and weights only a few 
ounces, is manufactured exclusively for the Ajax-Grieb Rubber 
Company by A. Schrader Sons. Inc., makers of the famous 
Schrader valve, which is used by every tire manufacturer of any 
size. It is a fact that about 90 per cent of all tire trouble is 
caused by tires being improperly inflated; motorists frequently 
being unable to tell when their tires are at the right pressure 
poise. With the Ajax Gauge, however, the pressure may be 
tested instantly by merely placing the instrument on the valve. 
An escaping through the valve into the gauge causes a graduated 
plunger to extend at the opposite end of the gauge, so that a 
reading of the number of pounds pressure is obtainable at once. 
Engraved on the gauge is a scale showing the correct degree of 
inflation for tires of all sizes. 

A good talking point on the Hudson car is the fact that the 
crank is removable, and this fact has been the means of several 
sales being made. In one instance, Mr. Dawson, manager of the 
Pioneer Automobile Company, in Oakland, was endeavoring to 
sell a Hudson car to a physician whose car, of another make, had 
recently been stolen and not returned for several days. Upon 
being convinced of the fact that the crank could he removed 
by the driver, and taken with him wherever he went, the doctor 
placed his order. The point might be raised that there was dan- 
ger of losing the crank, but this is practically impossible, as 
the same is held by a ball thruSt and spring that holds the car 
absolutely in position. 

* * * 

A New General Manager. 

Following the retirement of J. C. Matlack from the Michelin 
Tire Company, as announced some weeks ago, J. Hauvelle- 
Michelin has been elected Vice-President and General Manager, 
with headquarters at the general offices and factory, Milltown, 
New Jersey. 

Mr. J. Hauvette-Michelin is a nephew of Edouard Michelin, 
President of the four great Michelin factories which are located 
in America, France, England and Italy. 

* * * 

"I. a Tom-nine" carried as part of her cargo when she sailed 
from \v» York recently the express consignment oi the Mit- 
chell Motor Car Company of Racine, Wis., Eoi the ante 

show at Brussels. The Wisconsin Company will exhilm 

one polished chassis, a live passenger . ml One 

seven-passenger machine and a roadster. 




Fourteen out of fifteen automobiles in the Portola roa 

''loiwgram oils. Does this mean anything to pou ' Moore 
Motor Suyi'ly Co.. Los Angeles. Son FrimcUCQ end Oakland. 



herma 



The Pisk Rubber Company, of Chickopee Falls, Mass., have 
purchased five Chalmers-Del roit "30" runabouts for their sales- 
men in different parts of the country. The selection was made 
al'ler a careful try-out of all the automobiles offered for that 

purpose. 

» * * 

Mr. Fred Swanton. of Santa Cruz, made a most remarkable 
trip to-day with his top 60 horse-power Thomas Flyer, going from 
Santa Cruz to San Francisco in record time. Road conditions 
are good on the entire trip, with the exception of San Mateo. 



Ivan L de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



Golden Gate Ave. and Van Ness, San Francisco 




Expert Work on Auto 
Tires and Tubes. 

Compressed Air on 
Tap at the Curbing 



PHONE 

FRANKLIN 3727 



616-618 
VAN NESS AVENUE 



All your car needs is a 

SPLITDORF MAGNETO 

to have the Be£t Ignition in the world. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch. 520 Van Ness Ave.. San Franclaco, CaL 



F^HH 5000 

I Guaranteed for S.OOO miles or 20O da> s* service. 'Write for a I 
copy of our Guarantee. 
AJAX-GRIEB RUBBER CO. 
544 Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco. Cal 
Factories: Trenton. N. J. Branches in 15 Cities | 

r> -^mu B. Jeflery 4t Company. 117-128 Valencia St.. San Francisco 



For Those Seeking 

QUALITY 

NOT PRICE 

HIGHSON a MM" 

FaVCtwy RctsfCMsMNrTCi 

I 544 Via Neu Ave. Urn Fi 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 22, 1910. 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 878 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storaee Renting 



Supplies Machinist 



MOTOR CAR SERVICE CO. 

J. W. PEARSON, General Manager 

Market and Van Ness 



'The fines! Motor Car 
Station in the World." 



Phone Market 1708 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Rosenfeld, Mgr. 



Van Nest and Golden Gate. 



Phone Franklin 1535 



Golden Gate School of 
Automobile Engineering 



419-425 Larkin Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 



A. GILCREST 



Automobile 
Clearing House 



Sao Francisco. Cal 




1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 

S. G. RAYL 

Northern California Representative 

583-591 Golden Gate Ave. 
San .Francisco. 



'Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar 

Durocar Automobile Company 



of San Francisco 



88 Van Ness Avenue 



$25 to $50 

(According to Model) 

BUYS A REBUILT( L N ,^ R N L E Y W TYPEWRITER 

Your Choice 

Remington, Smith Premier, Oliver.Underwood 
All other makes ofTypewriters atspecial prices 

A New Machine Guarantee 

goes with every sale. 

■Write for descriptive leaflet. 

Rebuilt Department 
L. & M. ALEXANDER & CO. 

512 Market Street San Francisco, Calif. 

Branches — Los Angeles, Portland, Seattle, Spokane. 




Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR, NOSE" AND THROAT 

Office Hours: 1 to 4 P. M. Galen Bldg., 391 Sutter Street 

and by appointment San Francisco 

Phone Douglas 4138 

Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Succeeding A. Zellerbach & Sons 
Zellerbach Building, S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streets 



President, Stokes of the Thermoid Rubber Company Entertains 
the Lozier- Motor Company. 

At the great 24-hour race at Brighton Beach. October 15th 

and lGth, two 50 h. p. six-cylinder Lozier cars broke the world's 
record for 24 hours. Car No. 3. finishing first, established a new 
world's record of 1196 miles. Oar No. -I finished second place, 
with 11(39 miles to its credit, both cars exceeding the former 24- 
hour continuous record of 1050 miles. 

The Lozier Company, after the race, made public their ac- 
knowledgment of the efficiency of Thcrmoiil Brake Lining, and 
also of the eery conspicuous part it played in the important vic- 
tory. Aside from the Lozier Company winning a special prize 
for the greatest, mileage made in the last hour, and also winning 
the Sewald & Alden trophy offered to the car making the greatest 
mileage during any race in f909, they were further regarded 
by a. most beautiful gift at the hands of the Thermoid Rubber 
Company. At the dinner above referred to. given in the magni- 
ficent apartments of Mr. Stokes at the Hotel Royalton on De- 
cember 30th, the Lozier Company were presented with a beautiful 
and most remarkable tablet, the same having been executed by 
.Mr. Peter Korzilius, a sculptor and modeler of some note. The 
tablet above referred to measures three feet in height by five 
feet in length, and shows the two Lozier cars in action winning 
the race referred to. In order that the tablet might be exact and 
true to life, a photograph of (lie finish was taken, and the tablet 
was nude from the photograph taken. The same is so perfect in 
detail that one would recognize the drivers. 

While the dinner was not a large one, it is said to have been 
one of the finest given in New York in some time. The presen- 
tation speech was made by Mr. Henry ( '. Pearson, editor of the 
India Rubber World of New York, on behalf of the Thermoid 
Rubber Company, and accepted by Mr. F. C, Chandler, vice- 
president of the Lozier Motor Company. Those present were the 
following: Lozier Motor Company — F. C. Chandler. Vice-Presi- 
dent; Mr. Arthur F. Way, Manager Equipment Department; Mr. 
A. J. Diefenderfer, New York sales manager; Mr. C. A. Emise, 
Publicity Manager; Mr. Henry C. Pearson, editor India Rubber 
World. Thermoid Rubber Company — Mr. Joseph 0. Stokes. 
President; Mr. W. J. B. Stokes, Treasurer; Mr. Robert J. 
Stokes, Superintendent ; Mr. Fred S. Wilson, Manager Auto 
Goods department; Mr. Albert Numbers, Office Manager; Mr. 
John X. Kirk, Jr., Manager New York office. 

* * * 

In a cover of gray so embossed as to give it a suggestion of 
Turkish tapestry, is issued an "automobile catalogue dc luxe,'' as 
the II. II. Franklin Manufacturing Company of Syracuse desig- 
nates the formal ami elaborate announcement of its motor cars 
for 1910. This catalogue is pronounced by some who have al- 
ready seen it as one of the handsomest ever put out by automobile 
makers. It is printed throughout in colors. Five artistic full- 
page color drawings represent the Franklin automobile in various 
kinds of service. The pages have decorative borders of differenl 
design, and crayon sketches form a background for the views of 
the Franklin car models. 

Pictures showing the air-cooling system of the engine, the 
laminated wood chassis frame, parts of the engine, full-elliptic 
springs, fly-wheel and disc clutch, auxiliary exhaust and trans- 
mission are included, nil these being features of the Franklin 



The Howard Automobile Company received two shipments of 
1910 Oldsmobiles yesterday. Included in this shipment are two 
of the new close-coupled l-cylinder cars. This is one of the 
most beautifully finished cars shown on Automobile Row, and 
is especially adapted for touring purposes. There is a space 
under both front and rear scats for a suit case, the gas tank 
being back of the tonneau. This gas tank has a capacity of 30 
gallons. The car is particularly easy riding, being equipped 
with 36 iuelf wheels, and having shock absorbers all around. 

The demand for the close-coupled car is so great this year that 
the "bis factory announce that at least fifty per cent of their out- 
put will be made this year with this type of body. 

* * * 

The first Hudson car to be delivered in Sacramento went to 
Sieve Neale, and it has covered 6,000 miles sine Augusl 28th, 
when it reached here. So far the original set of tires have shown 
no signs of wear. During a recent trip to Folsom, Neale aver- 
aged twenty-four miles to a gallon of gasoline. 



January 82. 1910. 




and California Advertiser 



89 



Low Comedian — Yes, 
( 'hi, ago Daily News. 



Why, my 
-That's wlini evi 
announced.- ' 



Maek — I consider it decidedly out of place. Wylid — 

What? Mack — A now joke in a comic paper. — Judge. 

"So Wilkins ileserted Miss Barkis at the altar. Did his 

courage leave him?"' "Leave him! No, it returned." — Boston 
Transcript. 

TTpgardson — It goes without saying Atom — Then 

suppose we let it go that way. Lovely afternoon, isn't il ?" — 
Chicago Tribune. . 

"Miss Chatter is a sort of talking. machine, isn't she?" 

"No, not a perfect machine; she lacks the 'exhaust.'" — Balti- 
more American. 

Blobbs — I don't like one-man power in politics. Slobbs 

— Oh, what's the difference? If it isn't one man. it's another. — 
Ph iladelpJ) in Record. 

"A clear conscience is a fine thing in public life." "Yes," 

answered Senator Sorghum, "and next to that is a talenl Eor 
explaining." — Washington Star. 

"What do you do," asks a correspondent, "when yon can't 

think of any new jokes and all your ideas are gone?" "Haven't 
you noticed? We write poems." — Cleveland Leader. 

The Soubretti — Did you ever hear the new bariton sing 

"Eocked in the Cradle of the Deep?" 
twice — and it made me seasick both times 

Little drops of scandal, 

Little grains of nil. 
Make a famous novel 

Out nl' what is mil. — Tin/.-. 

Belle — How silly men acl when they propose? 

husband acted like a perfect fool. Nellie 
body though! when your engagement was 
land Leader. 

Visitor — Great Scott. What 'Id they ever give thai girl 

a part in (bis entertainment for. Sh ■ can't a, i ai all. Native- 
No, but she's gut more relative-- (ban any other three girls in the 
county |ni I together. 

"Please, teacher!" "Well, Gwendoline?" "1 told my ma 

I was in nouns ami she says 1 mm learn the proper nouns, but 

she don't want me I" have anything in il" with i 1 tnmon 

ones." — Baltimore A merican. 

Uncle Hiram Was the price of the eggs down at the city 

much different from ours? Uncle Si Wal. they were 
cents cheaper a dozen, but there wans't any more in a dozen 
than H hat h e " 

Mother maj I go out in fly ? 

oh. yes, hut. ire. 

Bang your -hoes on the flying machine. 

lint don't go in the air. — /. 

"Tell me." be pleaded, "what I can do to win your love? 

There is no danger that is to,, -rem. no task that I will not un- 
make you mine." "Gel me the tail of Halley's comet 
to put on my lin." Chi rd-TTerald. 
"Well," said Mr. Cumrox, "yonr party 

ceSS." "How can you tell?" asked his wife. "Winn 

along that makes me feel like i stranger in my own house 
1 know it's a brilliant occasion."— IFoaMnyt ■■ x '<' r . 

First Tramp — Oat woman in de red nous is 

a husband. Second Tramp — How do youse know? l 

she tolled me -ho wu7. looking for a man 

around de house, always be perlite, willin' ter work hard an' 
jive her no 

be long-distance call for you. v 

Manic- The fin r to tire mc. I 

Say, thai'- ' l. I don't know. Witli the l^ss 

in Europe and the other parts - - fighting o\er fa - 

in the courts, and the head of this department on an n 

in and thi 
it'll 1 - 



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HARTSHORN 
SHADE ROLLERS 



Bear the script name of 

Stewart Hartshorn on label. 



Get "Improved," 

Wood Rollers 



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no tacks required 

Tin Rollers 



Addressing Machine 

FOR SALE CHEAP 

One power drive Bellknap Addressing Machine 
complete with typewriter to stencil names. Will 
address and cut 6000 wrappers per hour. 

Commercial Supply Co., 75 Fourth Street 



. Santa Fe 



12 hours 
quicker 



To 



Kansas City— Chicago 



and 
Denver 



TOURIST EXPRESS 



Leave 

San Francisco 



8:00 p. m. 



every 
day 



Arrive Denver 2:30 p. m. Third day 

Arrive Kansas City 9.05 p.m. Third day 
Arrive Chicago 10:30 a. m. Fourth day 

Other transcontinental trains leave San Francisco 
7:15 a. m. and 10:00 p. m. 

For detail Information phone or call at Santa Fe offices: 
673 Market St.. San Francisco— 1112 Broadway. Oakland 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



1400 to 1450 Fourth St.. San Francisco. Telephone Market 30 14 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 




PEPSIN 

GUM 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 23, 1910. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 



Phone Kearny 3872 



134-136-138 Front St., San Francieco 



Aim Exp®irnim®initt 



Yosemite Valley 



OPEN ALL WINTER 

A panorama of ethereal winter beauty, 
beyond description. 

WINTER SPORTS-SLEIGHING— SKAT- 
ING-TOBOGGANING, 



Join one of the Winter Excursion Parties. 

Daily train service, and the fine tourist hotel 
at the Park Line and in Yosemite, make it a 
quick, comfortable trip at any time. 

See GEO. F. MILLER, Genl. Afit, 884 and 673 Market St, S. F. 




MAYERLES GERMAN EYEWATER IS 

■ simple and perfectly harmless Eye Remedy, (or children and 
adults. 

OFFICE CHIEF OF POLICE. San FraDclsco— It gives me great pleai- 
ore to recommend to the public Mr. George Mayerle of 060 Market St., 
San Francisco I have boon uaing glaesea for the paat tweWe yeara 
and during that time have consulted aaroral opticians, but not until 1 
had consulted Mr. Qeorge Hayerle aud had him fit glasses to my eyes 
did I get entire laliifaclioo . Most reipactfally, 

J. H. AHDERSON. Sergeant of Folks. 

IT IS MARVELOUS. The effect of Hayerle'* Eye Water has been 

marvelous and I shall recommend it aa the peer of all eye remedies. 

Yours truly, P. KELLY. Alameda County Hospital. San Leandro. Cal. 

Cr*?OT*l3£ MflV*?I*lt? Graduate German Expert Optician, charter member American 

** " Association of Opticians. 960 Market Street, opposite Hale's. 




> Franklin 3270. San Fra 



MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYE WATER, By Mail. 16c. 



ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS 

Goodyear Rubber Co. 

R. H. PEASE, President 

S87-589-591 Market Street, at Second 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets. San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



"Wanted — By wealthy couple, a girl between fifteen and 

twenty years of age, to be adopted. Education, refinement, g I 

lineage and presentable appearance required. Apply at 609 
Fifth avenue. — What a queer advertisement ! Do you think I'd 
fill the requirements of the desired daughter, Lil?" 

Helen Haskell lay down the paper from which she had been 
anxiously scanning the want advertisements, and regarded her 
room-mate half-laughingly, half-seriously. 

Lillian Kcnvon smiled. "No doubt but that you'd suit as a 
daughter, but I he question is — how would the parents suit you?" 

Helen frowned. "Beggars cannot afford to be especially dis- 
criminating in selecting adopted parents. Possibly twenty years 
from now my pictures and sketches may win recognition — mean- 
time I can't starve." She re-read the advertisement thought- 
fully. 

"I am going to apply this very afternoon, Lil." she cried with 
a swiftness of decision that dismayed her cooler and more cau- 
tious Northern friend. 

"But, Helen •" 

"Don't try to dissuade me, Lil, dean I must do it — I'm des- 
perate." 

"But you should make inquiries." 

"I'll take a look at my prospective parents first. If they adopt 
me I'll insist on having you for a sister." 

She pinned on her hat and caught up her gloves and cloak, 
fearing that her courage would wane if she delayed. 

"Wish me good luck! Au revoir!" and she flashed out of the 
room. 

As she mounted the steps of 609 Fifth avenue. Helen tell her 
spirits rise — the handsome but unpretentious brownstone man- 
sion, situated in an excellent residential sei lion, presented an 
air of such solid respectability. The appearance of the man ser- 
vant who answered her ring was also eminently reliable. 

She felt like a book agent as she blushingly asked for "the 
lady of the house." 

"She's not at home, madam." 

"I should like to see some member of the family.'" 

"Mr. Peniston is here." 

Helen gave a sigh of relief. She preferred dealing with men 
in business matters; she always found them less difficult than 
women, not aware that this was because her prettiness and per- 
sonal charm were potent passports lor favor with the sterner sex. 

She gazed about the luxurious ilrawine room with eager eves, 
but there was little time foi her to speculate as to whether she 
would ever be at home here — a daughter of the house. Mr. 
Peniston entered almost immediately. She was disconcerted 
that he was not elderly — somehow she had expected to (inil him 

a white-haired old gentleman, but he did not appear more than 
forty, his fare u:i- even younger than that, but his dark hair was 
sprinkled with gray; for the rest he was a large, good-looking 
man, with a genial smile and keen, humorous eyes. 

He held her card in his hand. 

"Don't take that chair, Miss Haskell; its slippery and uu- 
eomfortable." He pushed another forward. 

Helen liked and trusted him at once. 

"I came in answer to your advertisement, saying that you 
wished to adopt a daughter. Mr. Peniston." 

"Ah, I am very glad to see you, Miss Haskell. So you wish to 
be adopted?" His smile was cordial. 

"The very instant 1 saw the advertisement 1 was consumed by 
a desire to be adopted." 

"May I ask why?" 

"Certainly. I fancy we'll have to ask a good many questions. 
Poor and ambitious, I came to New York hoping to win fame 
and fortune, but like scores of Southern girls I have failed — 
this is why 1 wish to be adopted. I can prove to you and Mrs. 
Peniston that I am a lady by birth and breeding." 

"That is unnecessary," hastily. ' 

"Well," she said, with a faint flush of embarrassment, '"do 
you think you'd like to have me here?" 

"Like it!" And then restraining his enthusiasm he continued 

gravely: "Miss Haskell, to be frank, I shall be chari I. Of 

course, you'll expect us to establish proofs of our reliability, 
which can be easily done." 

"But your wifi will have to see me before anything definite 
can be decided " 



January 82, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



"Ah— yes, but it'll be all right." 

"Would von like me to take your name?" 

"Indeed ! would," eagerly. "Whal is your first name ?" 

"Helen." 

•' 'Helen, thy beauty is to mi ' " he broke the quotation off 

abruptly, alarmed by the somewhat startled expression in the 
girl's face. 

In the moment's strained silence a latch key was heard turning 
in the front door. 

"Perhaps that is your wife," Helen remarked in a relieved 
lone. 

The folding doors which gave upon the hall were half open, 
giving Helen a partial view of the lady who entered. 

Mr. Peniston strode to the door. "Come in here a minute, 
please," he said to the newcomer. 

"Have you company, Pen ?" she asked. 

Helen regarded her curiously. Surely this elderly woman 
could not be the wife of Mr. Peniston — why. her hair was snow 
white ! 

"This young lady is to be your daughter." explained Mr. Penis- 
ton. 

"My daughter! What does this mean, Peniston? Are you 
engaged to this girl ?" 

Helen crimsoned and then paled with indignation. 

"Mr. Peniston, explain this deception," she demanded, haugh- 
tily. 

The man laughed. "One minute — mother, this is Miss Eas- 
kell, Mrs. Peniston Murphy, Miss Haskell. Miss Haskell an- 
swered the advertisement that Curtis Graham inserted in the 
Times. Mr. Graham rents the upper floor of our house," hi- said. 
turning to Helen. "The advertisement was the outcome of an 
argument on sociology and was inserted tnerel] as an experimi mi. 
I advised strongly against it. 1 owe you an apology for mis- 
leading you, Miss Haskell." 

"You made her think thai the advertisement was genuine? 
That was very wrong. Will you forgive him. Miss Haskell." 

The gentle", sweet-faced mother \\;i- irresistible, and Helen 
promptly capitulated. 

In a few minutes she found herself seated on a aofa between 
Mrs. Murphy and her 3od, chatting as it they were old friends. 

That was the beginning the end was wedding bells and Helen 
domiciled at 609 Fifth avenue, a genuine d mghtei of the house. 

—Annir- lirt'sc l.<nl,-c in llostotl Post. 



\ 



While we have every confidence in the industry of the 

Panama-Pacific Exposition executive committee, 

when the gentlemen who have taken OVCT the notable work will 

stop their little pasl inn' of Forming 1 1 

work. There have been committees of Rve and « ommittees of two 

hundred and committees of thirty and committees of three and 

committees of seventeen and committees of three-fourths and 

nine-eighths, and whatever number you wish b 

the arithmetic or algebra. There is '•• be a fair in San l-V 

in 1915. Thai i iod. Nothing can take that hop 

ns. Hut if the i ' gentlemen of the many committees 

would devote pari of the energy used in the profitable 

organizing ami reo res to a more explicit and 

durable job. there would b neraJ interest in the expo- 

sition. It is rather trying on the memory of the public to 
to recollect whether our happiness in the year 1915 i- en 
at this particular moment to 199 or to 5 gentlemi n. We are will- 
ing to trust the success of the show to whatever number is de- 
cided upon, hut we are getting d'/.v from too much addii 
faction and long divis 






Be Clean— Use 

DUNTLEY 

PNEITHATIC 

CLEANERS 

"Not a Toy" 

Electric and hand power. See oar six sites for kosje 
use from tvS ro $140. with hill set o( cleaning loots. 

S. F. Compressed Air Cleaning Co. 

Suiter and Stockton Sts... S. F. 




/ 



CURES 



♦HEADACHES 

v 104,254,504, & $iqp Bottles* 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 

Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately, 
107 Montgomery street, near Sutter. San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601. 

Mark Lane, Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 245 Bush St. 
Phone Kearny 2629. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged: manufacturers of Barnes tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a m. to 1 p. m. ; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone West 1039. , 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Markel. 

ATTORNEYS- AT -LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law, Chronicle Building. San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS. 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole: painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
•', Westbank Building. 830 Market stro-t. San Francisco. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 
People's Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United 
States at the hotels and residences In Oakland. Alameda and Berkeley. 
Special attention to trans-bay baggage. Phones Oakland 4447: Alameda 
456; Berkeley 14: San Francisco. Kearny 679. 

Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street between 

Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

With full line of Brushes. Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 

to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders. Buckets. Chamois. 

Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware, Wood and Willow Ware*. 

Call, write or telephone Kearny 6787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 



Brushes 



White Diamond Water Co. 



lacorporateo' 



Pore Witer lor Oikliad 
Abasess 
BerteJer 



An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chsmlea.Hr 
treated, but bacterlologlcally purified by electrical process 6 gallons 
DELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. II 60 per month. Single 6 gallon 
bottle. 60 cents. 



480 45-11 Street 



Phones: Piedmont 1720 and Home A 4112. 



Osslasa. Gal. 



Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties, Telegraph Poles. Shingles. Split Shakes. Etc. 
Main Office— Crocker Bldg.. San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Francisco 



ALFRED BANNISTER 



EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 

1434 Post Street San Francisco 

Phone Kearny 28 71 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januaky S3, ]!H0. 



BANKING 



Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $10.94S,970.51 

Cash and Sight Exchange 12.852,206.86 

deposits 25,485,903.03 

Isaias W. Hellman, President I. W. Hellman, Jr., VTce-President 

F. L. Lipman, Vice-President Frank B. King-, - - - Cashier 

George Grant, Assist. Cashier W. McGavin, - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs, Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Isaias W. Hellman Wm. F. Herrin Leon SIoss F. W. Van Sicklen C. De Guigne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan Hartland Law Dudley Evaro J. Henrj Meyer 

I. W. Hellman, Jr. Chas. J. Deering Wm. Hass John C. Kirkpatrick F. L. Lipman 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New accounts 

are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000. 



Reserve, $6,000,000 



DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES . 

Arrangements have recently been completed under which the branches 
of this Bank are able to Issue Drafts on the principal points 
in the following countries: 
Austria-Hungary Finland Ireland 



Russia 

Servia 

Siam 

South Africa 

Straits Settlements 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 



Belgium Formosa Italy 

Brazil France Japan 

Bulgaria Fr'ch Cochln-ChlnaJava 

Ceylon Germany Manchuria 

China Great Britain Mexico 

Crete Greece Norway 

Denmark Holland Persia 

Egypt Iceland Philippine Islands West Indies 

Faroe Islands India Roumanla and elsewhere. 

NO DELAY IN ISSUING. FULL PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION. 

San Francisco Office — Bruce Heathcote, Manager, California and San- 
some streets. 

The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cat. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1,000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1.529,978.60 

Deposits, December 31, 1909 38,610,731,93 

Total Assets 41,261,682.21 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office, or Wells Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m.. except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. * 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President. Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt: Assistant 
Cashier, Wm. Herrman; Secretary. George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, 
A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells. General Attornevs. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt, Daniel Meyer, Emil Rohte. Ign. 
Stelnhardt. I. N. Walter, J. W. "Van Bergen, F. Trllman, Jr., E. T. Kruse 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH, 2572 Mission street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits onlv. C. W. Hever, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement street, between 5th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 
Manager. 

Central Tru^t Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness AvenLr 
Accounts of Individuals, firms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world 
Capital paid In, $1,600,000. Surplus, $100,000. 
| B. G. TOGN AZZI, Manager. 

French American Bank of Savings 



Savings 



108 SUTTER ST. 



Interest paid on^ savings deposits. Loans made on real estate and 
approved securities. 

OFFICERS — Charles Carpy, President: Arthur L,<^allet, Vice-President; 
Leon Bocqueraz, Vice-President; A. Bousquet, Secretary; John Ginty 
Cashier; M. Girard, Assistant Cashier; P. Bellemans, Assistant Cashier; 
P. A. Bergerot, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS— J. E. Artigues. N. C. Babin. O. Bozio, J, M Dupaa J A 
Bergerot, J. S. Godeau, Geo. Beleney, H. De St. Seine. Felix Sa n tallier 

Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent. 



Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. B. CORNER SANSOME AND PINE STREETS 
Capital, $4,000,000 Surnrnp *, ,„„ ™,„ 

SIG. GREENEBAUM, President; H. PLEISHHACKER Vlce'-Pre»id?nt 
and Manager; J. PRIEDLANDER, Vice-President; C F HIINT S' 
P r « ld $!it: R- ALTSCHUL Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN, ' Assistant Cashier; 
P. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. ' 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts makes 
telegraphic transfers, and issues letters of credit, available throughout 
the world, bends bills for collection, loans money, buvs and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 



Italian -American Bank 



S. E. Comer Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

surplus 210.000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers In foreign exchange 
Officers— A. Sbarboro. President; A. E. Sbarboro, Cashier; H. 




WHENCE COMES Oil: BREAD. 

I stood by the fanner's wheat bin, 

And toyed with the amber grain; 
And the handful of kernels lifted. 

Through my fingers fell like rain. 
And it seemed that a fairy whisper 

Was borne to my listening ear. 
And this is the beautiful story, 

I lowered my head to hear: 

"Behold, 'tis the life of the people. 

The food, the strength and power, 
That falls through your listlesB lingers. 

While spending an idle hour. 
And little heed yon. nor any. 

Of how you are strong and warm 
That your blood is red and thrifty 

With life from an humble farm. 

"All day, through the sultry August, 

The toiler guides his plow r ; 
Each furrow is blessed and watered 

By the sweat from his reeking brow. 
And thus is the wheat ground mellowed 

And thus prepared for the seeds. 
Willi plow, and harrow, and roller, 

While the sweat falls down in beads. 

"And when, with sowing eomplcted, 

He watches the seasons go, 
Till spring, with its rain and sunshine. 

Has softened the covering snow, 
WaiN, waits till the glowing summer 

Develops a field of wheat, 
And crystallizes the sweat drops 

For you and all to eat. 

"Then with reaping and threshing. 

All through the summer's heat, 
The water that blessed the furrow 

Must flow till the work's complete. 
Remember the drops which the toiler 

Jla-s brushed from his wearied brow. 
Are here, in the teeming wheat bin, 

To nourish a nation now." 



— Irene Bailey. 



GOSSAMER. 



Look how beneath the flickering autumn light 
Thai thread of gossamer a moment shows — 

A darted javelin in glancing flight . . . 

And now, 'tis lost to view, yet onward goes. 

Set loose on the soft, yearning autumn air, 

It wanders — lit or unlit of the sun. 
Life is that gossamer — here, and otherwhere. 

Lit or unlit it wanders, subtly spun. 

— Edith M. Thomas in The Century Magazine. 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 



Crocker, Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro, Assistant Cashier. 



J. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




Established July 20. IS36 



$G0 Fl^MO 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, January 29, 1910 



Ni. 5 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER Is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor, Fred- 
erick Marriott, 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco, Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, O. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C. England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current, number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA" ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 



Is Roosevelt to be this nation's "man on horseback?" 

A lot of hot-air seems to be necessary in promoting an 

airship show. 

Shoes and leather prices are Irving very hard to keep 

pace with meat. 

Can any one tell why it is easier to get on than off a 

crowded street ear? 

A little less conservation of favoritism in the Government 

land office is needed. 

Some evil genius is putting it into Bryan's head to try 

again for the White House. 

Democrats ;ill over the country arc holding "harmony" 

meetings. Wonder what for. 

A loud and long howl is going up Erorrj the rural districts 

ni' America for the parcels' post. 

If child life is a national asset, il might he well if the 

nation would take belter rare of il. 

Texas is having a wivk of prayer. Prom ail I lilts, they 

li.nl better keep on their lanes ;i whole month. 

Tuft does nol think his job has grown to dimension 

will require the help of the African Lion hunter. 

There is enough railway "regulation" legislation on tap in 

Washington to bankrupt ever] road in the country. 

The people of Belgium call their new King "Albert, the 

(hind." To distinguish him From I be Bad? 

Let the citizen never forget that a municipal franchise and 

concessions arc worth ,i lot of cash, payable in advance. 

It is when the insurgent asks a re-election by hit 

stituents that unexpected questions are burled at him. 

Abstaining from eating meal will surely lower prices, hul 

why not include all other "boomed" tabl mmodities? 

So far as anybody knows. San Franc:-, o lias taken on no 

fresh Parisian airs or customs Bince the tirst of the . 

Mr. Cunningham, Mr. Rallinger's friend, talks 

with his mouth to do the Secretary's reputation any t 

Since the Congressional insurgents have been obli 

flock by then no fun or profit in b 

nan. 

Nicaragua's paper money has reached the depth of 90 

per cent discount, gold measure. Zelaya took his share in the 
yellow metal. 

The agricultural products " ■ for L909 « 

look like a baby beside our I 
000. 

The II. . h-lletcbv region possesses era 

lage for the construction of dams, but what 
out something to dam? 
— — The Baroness Dchida, wife of th. p 
dor. speaks four languages, is h 

lueated in Am. I 



A Boston poet sings: "New England is different from 

heaven," and in climate quite unlike the other place, we should 

say. 

Pinehot knows a whole lot about the woods of America. 

hut that is no good reason why he should take to them because of 
Ballinger. 

Whatever others may do, do our American trust companies 

put trust in their own stock. The way they are'merging suggests 
as much. 

Our school-children are to have their teeth officially ex- 
amined by a committee of dentists. Wonder what for and also 
what next? 

When Eepublicans quarrel among themselves, Democrats 

begin to have hope, and they have reason to expect things will 
come their way. 

The British budget includes an item of $15,000,000 as in- 
surance for those out of work. For a monarchy, England likes 
the common people. 

— ! — It is not wholly the business of an insurgent to injure the 
part} thai elected him. nor to make war upon his party's national 
or State administration. 

Cotton is dropping SO fast in price thai then- is reason 

to hope thai it may be cheap enough for people to re 
id! once popular go 

Now comes a Harvard professor of political economy, pre- 
dicting a far-reaching war between capital and labor in 1910. 
It is the regular annual prophe, 

Texas and Florida have been a little chilly lately, just like 

California, but the usual crop of early vegetables and berries 
will be on hand at the usual time. 

Without Lake Kleanor or the Tuolumne, the Hetch- 

Hetchy would be of no more value to San Fran i would 

the desert regions of Nevada or Arizona. 

It is a little early for ambitions Mayors to make surveys 

to the Governorship. However, it often is better to start for 
the epaulets in time lest the rush be great. 

The report is, that Roosevelt will stand for < 

order to become Speaker of the House, which means that the 
former President proposes to hunt for trouble. 

They still in Vienna, and because he never 

■he newspapers, he is in total ignorance of tl 
h anywhere near the North P 

Our trade with Germany is worth aboi 

mot afford to have a fund war with - 
ier. But the game of politics must be played at any cost. 

1 Vanderbilt quite a million dollars to 

"chum" with the poverty-stricken no nrope. They are 

e;ood borrowers, and are always looking for rich chumps to work. 

Canada's navy scheme includes warships to look 

England's interests on the great lakes, all of which implies that 
•intrv will sleep while they are buildine. What 

The sugar frauds disclos 

I lot of rich and aristocr.i 
Uncle Sam knows himself, he will land a few 
r entiary. 

A French aviator has demonstrate- 1 

tion that b< r over any or army at a d 

of one mile and send shower a1 

earth below without danger to his airship. 



E ID) D T © 1 D A L 



۩ 



EIMT 



Abolishing City 
Rehorm Movements. 



The Blue Laws of our recent Super- 
visors are now being adulterated with 
the reel tour of the new majority, 
and an imperial purple of good 
sportsmanship is to envelop the city in a joyous aura. 

The first step was taken on last Monday, when Supervisor 
Oscar Hooks, albeit a relique of the old board, introduced an 
ordinance to revoke an existing law so that men — and ladies, too, 
if they are of the mind — may smoke in street ears. The ordi- 
nance will be passed by the good fellows of the present board, and 
soon again we may delight ourselves with the essence of good and 
bad tobacco, wafted from our own and other mouths, as we jour- 
ney to and from work. 

Where then' is to be so much smoke there surely will be some 
fire, but just the extent of the conflagration is yet to be deter- 
mined. The new board is expected to re-establish the nickel in 
the slot machine for the benefit of business. II is difficult to un- 
derstand why the tobacco interests in this city did not have the 
last Board of Supervisors abolished as a conspiracy in restraint of 
trade. For the board surely played hob with the nicotine indus- 
try in this city. 

But now that business may be restored to its former supreme 
position.on our streets, and the merry click of the nickel falling 
downward, and' the alluring whirr of the five wheels as the poker 
hands miscalculate and fail to form may soon again be heard. 

The question arises : What is to he the next reform ? 

The recent Board of Supervisors established a board of cen- 
sorship over the nickelodeon. Will that board be legislated out 
of the way, and the motion picture shows given warrant to oper- 
ate such films as "A Rose of the Tenderloin?" 

Not to change the subject — the old board established a dead 
line which was not to be crossed by certain persons. That law 
was rather anomalous, as other persons, engaged as flagrantly in 
the same traffic, were permitted to live outside the dead line. 
Still, the law is in many respects a good one. for it gives the 
police the opportunity of disciplining the undesirable. 

But it will be logical now to abolish the deadline as the ordi- 
nance prohibiting smoking in street cars is to be rescinded. For 
it would be class legislation to open the street ears to smoking 
men and to segregate from the street ears the women of the 
class most addicted to the use of tobacco. 



Water for Greater 
San Francisco. 



Something more than a supply of 
water to parallel the mains and lat- 
eral conduits of the present distrib- 
uting system should be considered. 
The San Francisco of to-day has a territorial limit, made so by 
legal boundary lines which are distinctly defined by official sur- 
veys, which also mark territorial ownership and county jurisdic- 
tion, together with individual property rights. If the present 
boundary lines of (he city and county of San Francisco an im- 
movable, then a limited supply of water would need be pro- 
vided for, winch quantity would not be very difficult to deter- 
mine, for the time would come when the limit of population 
to be supplied would be reached. But such is not really the cas . 
When considering a water supply for San Francisco, V,.. should 
take into account the possible, if not the probable, future of San 
Francisco as to population and business expansion. Sooner or 
later, very likely in the near future, the Southern boundary of 
the official city will have to be moved many miles southward, Eor 
there is no other direction in which the city can grow in either 
population or territory. Hence, as the city grows, it will be 
obliged to expand down the peninsula because of geographical 
reasons, and because there is no land to the east or west or north 
of the present site. 

Say, for instance, that San Francisco is destined in the not 
very distant future to have a population of 1,000,000. Ai leas! 
one-half of the increase would be obliged by reason of immovable 
obstructions to seek homes to the southward on the peninsula, 
but they would not be residents or citizens of San Francisco. 
unless the southern boundary line of the city were extended 
southward far enough to include them in the city's lawful popu- 
lation, and to do that, all public and quasi-public utilities would 
have to be extended tinder the same supervision, else the addi- 
tional population and the territory occupied by it would not be 

in or a part of San Francisco; hence the wisdo I' taking into 

account the needs of this new population and extended municipal 



limits in plans for enlarged public utilities is apparent. If 
the growth of the city is not amply provided for along the penin- 
sula to the southward, the overflow of population would be forced 
across the bay, where it would be as foreign to San Francisco, 
so far as direct identification with the city is concerned, as if 
ii had no existence at all. 

It may he conceded without argument that if San Francisco 
is to grow in population, the city will have to expand its incor- 
porated territory: the successful accomplishment of the latter 
would be contingent upon the installation of a water plant in 
advance of home building, or at least for its extension as rapidly 
as demanded. But even if the plans of the present administra- 
tion do not provide or contemplate a water system for the terri- 
tory beyond the city limits in anticipation of the city's growth, 
the fact that the peninsula is bound to become thickly populated 
is so apparent that, so it is said, the Spring Valley Company is 
planning to extend its accessorial plant so as to cover the territory 
that, by the nature of things, must eventually become a part 
of official San Franeiseo. But that would give part of San 
Francisco an independent water system and another part a muni- 
cipal system. That conflicts would follow, there is no reason to 
doubt, especially so because the. city could not come in competi- 
tion with an already established public utility without violating 
the sacred right of private and quasi-public enterprises. The 
conclusion is, therefore, that if San Francisco does not provide in 
its present scheme for a municipal water plant for a water supply 
for the peninsula, the time will come when the plani occupying 
the field when the city is ready to act, will have to be purchased 
at about, its own price. , 



Mure substantia] evidence was pro- 

V.immiing Gallagher, dnced before Judge Lawkrr (his week 
that James Gallagher left the juris- 
diction of the State with the full knowledge and connivance of 
tlie Spreckels prosecution, which at the time of his disappearance 
was still in control of the District Attorney's office and had 
assigned two special officers to watch his movements. At the 
outset, the fact that the two Burns spies did not make any pub- 
lic report of his departure until he had been given three days' 
start, was sufficiently suspicious. The testimony given by his 
brothers last Monday demonstrates conclusively that his disap- 
pearance was a "put-up job." Doubtless, Gallagher was weary 
enough of his three years' moral servitude, and as his masters 
were about to go out of business, and could no longer use their 
most serviceable of tools, they were willing to let him levant. 
Two years ago, it will be recalled, Gallagher had been permitted 
to disappear. Patrick Calhoun had been promised a trial. Bui 
the Sprcckels Prosecution was anxious to avoid fulfillment of that 
promise. Accordingly. Gallagher was given a leave of absence, 
providing a fairly plausible excuse for yet another postponement 
of the Calhoun trial. At the beck and call of Spreckels, Heney 
and Burns, Gallagher in presence or absence was equally service- 
able. 



The reasons that the Sprcckels 

Covering their Tracks. Prosecution made no objections to 

Gallagher's recent ''get-away" are 
not far to seek. Like the late Chief of Police Biggy, Gallagher 
knew too much. The best trained of "good dogs" might forget 
his training when the lash of his master's whip was no longer at 
hand. His performance was finished, ami his contract with 
Rudolph Sprcckels, undertaken in those secret assignations in the 
Presidio nearly three years ago, had been fulfilled. Without 
Burns at his heels, Heney at his elbow, and Rudolph Sprcckels 
holdirfg reward or punishment over his bead. Gallagher might 
forget the most important of his lessons, though conned so often. 
Gallagher's departure, doubtless, was sanctioned for the same 
reason that impelled the Spreckels Prosecution to make a clean 
sweep of the records of the Burns spies from the District Attor- 
ney's office. On the eve of their being ousted from a public 
office which for three years had been abandoned to private con- 
spiracy, the leaders of the Spreckels Prosecution took every 
pains to cover their tracks, to leave no aid for their successors in 
office in either the continuation of the graft cases or in tic in- 
vestigation of themselves. James Gallagher afforded one of the 
most important of those tracks. 



January 29, idid. 



and California Advertiser 



Perhaps President Taft is doing 
Tut ami Ballinger. nothing more than his duty in stand- 
ing by Ballinger, and il may I"' that 
his Secretary of the interior is a much-maligned man, bul the 
Presideni should know by this time thai there is some truth in 
the old adage that where there is so much smoke there must be 
lire. At all events, he should know that public sentiment is not 
upholding him in his efforts to prove Ballinger to be a marvel- 
ously proper man. Mr. Ballinger should be too far above sus- 
picion to need any defense for past conduct or present plans for 
the conservation of the nation's natural resources, and if he is 
not, he has himself to blame, and should hesitate to ward off just 
criticism by crawling under the President's official cloak. 

Both the President and his secretary seem to think that the 
revelations of Pinchot and Glavis and the Congressional inves- 
tigation of the coal and timber lands scandal are merely so many 
wicked conspiracies to involve the administration in wrong con- 
duct, but they arc greatly mistaken. No one has to be told that 
there are rings upon rings composed of men in high political 
and social places whose chief business is to steal the nation's pub- 
lic domain. The woods of Alaska. Oregon and the Slate of 
Washington are full of them. Unfortunately, Mr. Ballinger is 
personally acquainted with many of these ringsters, and counts 
more or less of them his personal friends of long social and busi- 
ness intimacy, and for some of their claims to Government lands 
lie has in the past given his personal influence, time and legal 
advice. But he could have done all that and still remain un- 
spotted, and it is nothing more than just to him to say that be 
did. On the other hand, the fact is against him that he did 
use his official authority to rid his department of the very offi- 
cials who were in a position to tell the truth about the land rings, 
and insisted that it was their official duty to tell all they knew. 

Now it is not the "insurgents" that are demanding that tie' de- 
posed land officials. Pinchot and Glavis, he put upon tin' Con- 
gressional witness stand, where they may have opportunity to tell 

all they know about II onspiracies to plunder public lands in 

the Northwest. It is not to compromise President Taffs admin- 
istration that the public wants, hut that the facts shall no longer 
he concealed, nor an' the so-called "insurgent" members of Con- 
gress actuated by personal spite. They want to know why. and 
for what. Secretary Ballinger is so shielded by tin- admit 

lion, and why the Secretary is so enraged at Pinchot ami Glavis. 



The Insurgents. 

What Can ThkyMioan. 



Guarding the 
Pacific Coast. 



Uler the Pacific Coast has clamored 

for years for a battleship flee! I' 1 
guard our ports and our commi 

such as if is- il is surprising (hat the 
announcement that a Bquadron was to ho assigned to the Pacific 

should arouse so little newspaper and public interest. 

II was inevitable thai a Heel would ho assigned to the Pacific 
Ocean. It is necessary as a war expedient thai naval officers be- 
come accustomed to tic waters of the Pacific and to the a 

phv of the continents that touch on this greal Sea. 

Then, it is polite for the country to keep a fleet of good dimen- 
sions in the Pacific Ocean so thai when there is to he a Fourth of 

.liil\ celebration at Portland, or a world's fair at Tia Juana or a 

Panama Pacific exposition at Sun Francisco then would he 
plenty of ships to (rive nautical eclat to the event 

That, of course, is a matter of by-play, which the naval depart- 
ment considered merely as a politician's, not a political, argu- 
ment. 

The o squadron of battleships to the Pacific 

fleet is simply a phase of \\ ut ion. Ii was not done be- 

cause chambers of commerce and boards of trade and di 
men! committees urged ii. so much as il was done bees 
West is growing in national importance, and ran rlooked 

as an integral pari of the nation. The Easl has had it- - 
ing period, what we of the West, in real estate lingo, 

" Ii has h tied, staid, permanent in it= situation. 

Hut the Wesl v continually -'owing and daily is assuming new 

tance. Ii is no! the petitions of the commercial bodi 
drew the battleship here S o mie h as il was ihe irresistible magnet 
of the Pacific Coasfs growing g 

Hut at that, the commercial bo mportunate 

should have had the e resolutions commendit 

lit of the nali" 'intent in providing the fl 

gnard this seaboard. The organisations undoubtedly would 
have done so if their literary bureaus wen 
ing memorii • og that ti 



The Republican parly is ill power at 

Washington. The Republican p 
is pledged to accomplish things that 
it should accomplish in the interests 
of the people. With the plans outlined by President, Taft, in- 
deed, this present Congress has a chance to do more toward set- 
ting matters right in this United States — particularly adjusting 
the differences of monopoly and labor and getting a leash on 
both — than any other Congress in the history of our Government. 
But what is the situation as we find it — what is the present 
Congress likely to accomplish if it follows its present trend? 
President Taft, the man at the helm, stands ready, it is true, to 
carry out his pledges, but of what avail is the man at the helm 
if his steering gear or engines have gone wrong? The ship whose 
engines try to make headway and back water at the same time, 
though she may represent infinite travail, can never represent 
any progress. This is just exactly what the "insurgent'' faction 
means to Congress. It's special devil is .Toe Cannon, and in or- 
der to wreak its vengeance, it forgets legislation and delays the 
good of the country as a whole. So long as it stands thus divided 
Ihe Republican party can hope to perform only a small part of 
what has been promised. In a word, the one golden opportunity 
of a nation will have been wasted because a few men have taken 
it into their heads to dislike the Speaker of the House. In the 
matter of proper legislation the psychological moment is upon 
us — when legislation would count most. Other conditions or 
public moods may arise, and such a favorable time may not come 
again for years. What, then, are the insurgents going to tell Ihe 
people they represent when they go back to them, and it is all 
over? Will they say. "There are no results as we have promised 
you, but we have blasted Cannon some, and by so doing we have 
made our political impress upon the country; our notorietj is 
permanent." If the insurgents arc really so much in earnest con- 
cerning the country's progress, as they, pretend to he. the proper 
way to show it would he to fall in line with ihe "regulars," and 
help the President accomplish something in the way of legisla- 
tion that would reach and hit higher than Cannon. Tn that man- 
ner, if their revenge is just, they would succeed in il. too. It's 
clipping the roots of an evil that counts. What does the servant 
mailer when above him is the master. The master can always 

get another servant, bul 'he servant cannot always gel another 

master. 



I'm i ! \li 8T \"i 
I lOM E B UK. 



A movement is on foot among the 
cigar men to get permission 
order from our new city administra- 
tion to re-establish the slot machines. 
It is to ■' thai tbi- privilege will not he granted them. 

The slot machine represents 'he easiest and worst form of gam- 
bling, and 'he city ifl well rid of such a devil's device. In com- 
parison with this evil, even the race-track i- only a minor affair. 
The slot machine placed at every corner, and between e.irners, i- 
a constant temptation that no man. once he has dabbled with it. 
can resist. Moreover, in ninety-nine i ;' every hundred, 

the playing of it becomes a mania with him. The w 
a inaeii he poor victim's tier ling for just one 

push of the button, and having once started, he fo ■ . thing 

and plavs fur hours at a time, lured on by occasional small wins. 

the advantage of the eigannan. of course, to fix his 
machine so that these wins will occur. Bnl 
that the machine turns out nothing large. If any machine should 
happen to do so at any time, it is almost immediately put out of 
business till it has been mechanically overhaul' 
and "fixed." The slot machine evil is 

poor man and his family that suffer most from it — the poor man 
on his way home with his wi 

•ng himself tn play only 'wo or four bits, hut h 
through, he has wast hole week's earninss. And a 

shadow-eyed, hard-working woman and hungry, meagre-clad lit- 
tle ones suffer the cons f his mania and folfj 
slot machine has crone the way it deserved. 1 tin in 
oblivion. 



J. Pierpont Morgan most 

• finance. The recent m< 
:' as the controlling infl'.i 
interests of which he is at the head, makes him the 
factor in corpora- total capitalization reaches the enor- 

mia of ten billion dollars. 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 



With a clear conscience, San Fran- 
The Anti-Pood Boycott, cisco could join in the anti-food 
boycott — but it is improbable that 
we shall on any large scale. 

In more than thirteen States there are well-organized move- 
ments of practical protest against the high prices on food stuffs, 
.which is the spirit of the movement which culminated in the 
Boston Tea Party. 

Taxation without representation caused the first uprising of 
the Americans against the hands that supplied — for ample con- 
sideration — their food. Taxation with misrepresentation is re- 
sponsible for the modern protest. 

The new movement is a direct outgrowth of the anti-trust 
league, but it might as well be called the development of an anti- 
protective tariff league. 

For these 134 years. Americans have enjoyed freedom and have 
had their representatives make its taxes. The representatives 
were supposed to be what their name implies, but in recent year- 
there has been a growing mistrust of the gentlemen sent to 
Washington to eorae under the plausible domination of Aldrich 
and Cannon and the other able and ardenl advocates of com- 
mercial expedien 

Then, in 1908, a Congress and a President were elected on the 
platform of a revision of the tariff that would make the cost of 
living less. Soon the people found that their condition was but 
slightly altered from that of their ancestors, who cried ably. 
"Taxation without representation is tyranny." 

The people found that they were misrepresented. They found 
that the boasted decrease in the cost of living, which Presidenl 
Taft had fondly promised, was no more real than the old British 
•tamp acts were just. 

Now the people have hit upon a method o£ coercing the trust- 
to reduce prices down to a common, sensible level. In thirteen 
States of the United States, people are arbitrarily changing theii 
lie! as a martyr's protesl against the exorbitant cost of living 
axacted by the trusts. 

No one will suffer by adopting a vegetarian diet. Many of 
them, probably, will improve their health by this voluntary 
mortification of the flesh, as the churchmen call it. 

But that is not the point in measuring their patriotism. No 
one suffered in Boston by depriving themselves of tea. 

The people are simply adopting the protestant patriotism of a 
martyrdom of inconvenience. 

By their ardent and picturesque object lesson to the balance 
of the people in the United States — which the light-hearted, good- 
living San Franciscans may not imitate, no matter what prices 
the fish trust and the fruit trust and the egg trust set — the boy- 
cotters are. by their valiant lesson in self-restraint, calling to the 
mind of the people that while taxation .without representation is 
tyranny, taxation with misrepresentation is criminality. 

The result of the general election in 
The English Masses. England for a new Parliament last 
Saturday came as a great surprise 
to Anglo-Saxons generally. The Lords were defeated, and the 
Commons fully sustained on the main issue, which was the bud- 
get, lnii the majorities for the Government were surprisingly 
small, the Liberals losing ground almost everywhere. The great- 
esi surprise is, that the Lords proved bi the resull how very close 
the nobility stand in the confidence and affections of (he masses. 
Evidently the common people of England arc wedded to the 
aristocracy. Even royalty had to step aside to make way Eor the 
procession of titled land-owners. Undoubtedly the people of 
all classes are bound to the existing system of law-making, and 
pin their faith to the wisdom of the Upper House to 
partures of the Lower House from the beaten paths. It had 
been 300 years since the House of Lord = ass irted their right, a 
doubtful right, at best, to defy and antagonize the Com 
and although the people did not fully sustain them in their re- 
bellion, they did make it very plain to the King ami to hi- sub- 
jects that the Lords are a political and social power in England 
to which the masses are strongly attached. 

The budget, the issue over which the war of ballots raged, was 
conspicuously in the interest of the common people, lor its 
main feature was a plan to oblige the nobility to pa 
proportion of the public revenue, thus relieving the general pub- 
lic of a goodly share of the_ existing tax burden. It was not de- 
nied that the heavy expenditures of the I 
preparations required additional revenues, but it seems the 



masses would rather hear the burdens of taxation now upon their 

shoulders, than saddle i i e of them upon the nobility, which 

mean- that human nature i- as queer and perverse in England 
as in some other countries. To he sure, the Commons won out, 
and the Lords lost, but the majority against the Upper House 
was materially reduced, and thus the Lords really won a great 
moral victory, a! least to the extent of a warning from the peo- 
ple that further war upon the peers to reduce their power in 
legislative matters by either king or politician, would he re- 
buked by the masses. The heart of the average Englishman is 
set on maintaining the • icrednese of Hie nation's traditions, and 
of sustaining thi nobility when it comes to stripping them of a 
political and law-making power which, by the way. they have 
neve] seriously abused. After all, the masses of England are 
ae ii ition'e Gibraltar, and not often do they worship at the altar 
of strange I rods. 



Congress, which has always taken it- 
■ i, i-Bl -lie Si \tes. self with the greatest .seriousness, is 

at present in a terrible muddle. In 

spite of election pr tses, it does not know whether it should 

admit New Mexico and Arizona as States or not. Now that 

things have quieted down, the two loot: like bucking bronchos 
to it. Compared with some of the Eastern States, indeed — States 
thai have Ions forgotten how to play poker and drink whisky — 
the two territories seem worse than wild horses or rattlers coiled 
on the trail. Untamed and original things, they think, too. in 
a differenl way, and Congress has a proper fear for that kind of 
originality, particularly as expressed in what it terms "freak 

constitutions." Wit] raged feelings it points to Oklahoma — 

its lasi experience — and shudders. But meanwhile New Mexico 
aed Arizona are clamoring for admittance. What's more, they'll 
L'ct it if they line in drug a tenderfoot Congress at the end of 
a rop, And nei i etc of the proposed veto if they prove 
igh-kickmg — arc i!n\ [ikely to give over any of their ideas as 
to laws or governing principles. -Tn a word, they will come 
forth witi ion suited to their own style and tempera- 
ment; a tempert nt whose favorite axiom is, "Live every day 

so (hat yon can look everj damn man in the eye and tell him to 
go to hell." Congress to flic contrary, this is nevertheless quite 
as il should be. There i- inure truth under an open sky than 
r roofed in a temple, and Arizona and. New Mexico have 
mostly lived and slept so. Whichever way they vote — and Con- 
greSS o:n: resi assured they'll vote as they please — it is a 
ten to one bet that both have it in them to teach the country some- 
thins. As for the drab shoddv weave of present conventional 
politics, what could he hotter than to introduce into it a little 
of the whole wool of ripping Western originality. 



Wedding Prrsenis. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 



g 




* 



CHAS. 

EXCISUSIVE 

HIGH GRADE CLOTHIERS 

No Branch Stores. No Agents. 

AS USUAL WE ARE THE FIRST TO SHOW ADVANCE SPRING 
STYLES. FASHIONS DECREE HAS MARKED OUR MODELS, FAB- 
RICS AND PATTERNS AS "OFFICIALLY" CORRECT AND WE ARE 
PROUD TO PLACE BEFORE OUR KNOWING CLIENTELE SUCH A 
COLLECTION OF "BLUE - R I BBON ERS." WE INVITE THE INSPEC- 
TION OF ALL GOOD CLOTHES ADMIRERS. 



THIS LABEL, 

MARKS! THE 



dlheuyub smartest 
©rjaa^Fteilus & (JdaiN L KxisTENCE. 
J§> an JrranctscD, 



v :an readllj perceive the advantage of buying from a 

strictly exclusl clothier. We don't have to worry 

about the small articles, which demand fully as much time 
and attention as the principal one. By devoting all <>ur time 
and attention tn men's clothes only, don't you think we are 
better -able to tell you what Is right and wrong in the mattei 
Of Clothes? "TOO many irons in the fire" is a positive fact. 
We think and have nothing but men's clothes. 



Jewelers Building, Posl Street, near Kearny, San Francisco 



January 29, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




"^ 



0WNCRIEFL 



:." ': 7/btrJh && Me tie Sri/ ai 3m/ C—*^*^ .. 

datfjif wjotjouf' 



The lady-like young gentleman, whose chief mission in 

life is to write sweetly sweet interviews, veal and imaginary, with 
actresses for the amusement of the Chronicle's readers, has been 
permitted to witness Olga Nethersole in action. With the play 
itself he appears to have been as profoundly impressed as upon 
that other occasion when tears marred his view of an Alcazar 
performance. To quote: "In the balcony scene the hint of the 
approaching tragedy is so vague as scarcely to disturb the sur- 
face of verse into which the new moon of love reflects an opulent 
splendor of meaning. All is of an unmarrcd yet vivid and 
quivering beauty." Admissions such as that lift the human soul 
to such an altitude of refining delight that it is difficult to detach 
it from the infinite. Of Olga he says: "The effective business 
of flinging the end of her scarf to her lover, was graceful, but I 
believe it has been done before. [Yes, dear, it 1ms.] The whis- 
pering accentuated the mystery of the moonlight hush but 
seemed to belong to the text. The only lack I could sense was 
that inward flutter which must have agitated Juliet." Miss 
Nethersole is to be congratulated that the young man made no 
attempt, to run his arm down her throat and feel for it. 

Mr. McCarthy, the Mayor, and those other gentlemen 

occupying, by the grace of God and the favor of Mr. Taylor, 
memberships in municipal boards, who at present have an ani- 
mated difference of opinion regarding their individual and politi- 
cal indispensablencss, are rapidly approaching a crisis. That the 
latter and, numerically, larger contingent, might spare them- 
selves the exertion and Eorego Ihe gratification of affirming one 
another's excellence and peculiar fitness tor municipal favor is 
also apparent. The Mayor openly boasts ef a choice, though 
limited, variety of trophies already decorating his belt, and 
proffers to the remaining commissioners the option id' being pub- 
licly scalped or having the operation performed decent!} tni 
quietly, on scientific principles, behind closed dooTS In his own 
inelegant but decisive diction: "If those commissioners don"t 
choose to step down easily, they'll step down bard." 

In this connection, il is slated that .1. .1. McTiernan, 

a teacher of plain and ornamental blacksmithing, in the Poly- 
technic High School, is Blated for a place on the Bo 
cation. With the purpose to earnestly pre 
fiee of bad Government I have a] 

and for this and other reasons I shall not nto an unin- 

tentional and premature im renturing I 

the horny-handed sons of toil who h 

performance of I dch I. as a men ton-pro- 

dorer. can be expei ted to "<->* little. Pasl i ■ 

that, their ways are the - man's 

and 1 am satisfied that in efforts at comprehension, tic 

merely human understanding nnusl continu to grasp bill empty 

air — at least until they have bad t u n with 
the Grand duty. 

There being no la« ittempted elopement, two 

Indians of the Yuma Reservation, who broke 
girls' ionnitor to steal 11 beans away for m 

5, were jailed for attempted burglary. T 
a point, beyond which 
sault. ceases to be dignified, even in an Indian, and i 

-t an inclination to 
zation. they should be permitted 
future expects 

Albert Kamp, 

slick used by the I 
same as that employed '■* 
delta in the time 

vrang Tril* <>i Indians mm 
scended from til 

I. auJ wi 
matters 
disturb Mr. K > 



It would require an imagination of singular fecundity 

lo conceive a more adequate expression of good will toward any- 
thing merely human, than is voiced by the spontaneous outflow 
of long pent up emotion on Ihe part of Ihe Woman's Auxiliary. 
in unanimously inviting the male element of organized society to 
their evening meetings. It has been made known that part of 
the organization's work, for which the a*l of the men is desired, 
will be to furnish the means to guide public opinion to an un- 
derstanding of the prevention of child delinquency, and thereby 
determine the conduct of society by "purifying the stream at its 
source." Any self-respecting man should be glad to lend his 
ea rnest co-operation. 

Professor John J. Montgomery, of Santa. Clara, Califor- 
nia, after having maintained the secret, locked within bis inner- 
most consciousness, for years, has at last frankly confessed that 
he is the inventor of all the devices that made the flying machine 
of the Wright brothers so pronounced a success. These devices 
were developed by him twenty-five years ago and pres ailed to the 
public as a gift. Among them was the idea for laternal bal- 
ancing used in the Curtis machine. As early as 1894, Professor 
Montgomery constructed a flier encompassing all the essential 
features of the Wright machine, which was a perfect success in 
every way except in the one particular that it would not fly. 

Poet George Sterling, the intrepid youth who sought, and 

rather successfully, to improve upon the lines descriptive of Ed- 
mond Dantes' return to the deserted home of his father, has been 
robbed — not of his reputation, his popularity nor his good looks, 
but of much silverware and fine linen. The circumstance h wor- 
thy of mention only as supplying evidence in refutation of the 
commonly accepted belief that all poets are hungry and lean as 
regards both body and pocket-book. This is a day, praise Her!, 
when any man may write poetry and al the -one time accumulate 
a competency by industriously applying himself to some remuner- 
ai tve occupation. 

We are informed that if Rostand's "Chanticleer." the 

characters of which are birds, clothed in realistic manner, is a 
success in Paris, it will he brought to America. Lucien Quitry 
is the hem. ,i rooster, and Madame Simone, a ben pheasant the 
heroine. 'Ihe Ian to be delighted with her part. Her 

miIi obi© < "ii wat to 'rein., to lai an egg on the stage, i 

■.I .i ib ! granting ■■ i p o lay it in the wings. 

'I "i thi I Lifornia Club have resolved thai the 

"third degr » " shall go. 1 of Police informs the 

that thi in San Francisco, Imt 

that makes no d Better 

.. than that the infamy of our fair city be retarded 
by the inquisitional horrors of this n 

The 8 i -" many 

■thieves whi 

tv of beef cattle in this country. Imt he 
ly the department's official counl shows nol only an ample 
supply, but an unusually large surplus. The 9 

ami too considerate of the feelings of the packer-. Be 
id call them liars, thieves and human wol 



RHINE & MOSELLE 
WINES 

FROM 

ED. SAARBACH & CO. 

MAYENCE. GERM A 

Used in all the Bes~l Hotels. Cafes. Etc. 

Charles Meineeke & Co. 



Agents Pacific Coast 



San Francisco 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 




When it comes to marriage, there is something radically 
wrong with the artistic temperament. It begins to look, indeed, 
that for the benefit of the fair sex, not always fair, if should be 
labeled "Poison." Here we have Chandler Christy, the artist, 
and Richard Harding Davis, the author, discarding their wives 
within a day or two of each other. Of course, women possess 
the artistic temperament, too — for instance, Mrs. Christy who, 
according to the evidence adduced, was found drunk cm several 
occasions, in different fence corners with her chauffeur. Or is 
it possible she found the chauffeur a greater artist than Christy? 
Let Omar, who knew everything pertaining to the grape, answer. 
But even the case of the Christys furnishes no excuse that Rich- 
ard Harding Davis, writer of romances, caterer of lushy love 
drops, should disillusion us. too. Always had we pictured him 
on a "Heaven-kissing hill." and now he comes rudely down to 
earth, and tells us that he does not love his wife. And we had 
hoped and believed that he was not like other men. Isn't it a 
croo-el croo-el world, am! how many other divorces will this 

cause. 

* * * 

It is not generally known, in spite of the fact that he is an 
Irishman, that Mayor McCarthy possesses in no small degree 
the gift of repartee. Once, not long before he became Mayor, he 
had occasion to roast, laughingly, and in a rather public way, one 
John W. Sweeney. Irishman, too. Mi-. Sweeney, as it happened, 
met McCarthy on the street the next day. 

"Well," he ejaculated irately, "I see you've been getting oil 
a lot of cheap wit at my expense." 

And McCarthy retorted: "It must have been cheap. John, to 

have been at your expense." 

* * * 

W. R. Hearst, condescending to write for the Examiner under 
his own signature, told recently of his sensations in a flight with 
Paulhan, the aviator, at Los Angeles. But there was one thing 
that Mr. Hearst forgo) to tell. When he took his seal behind 
Paulhan in the frail craft, he became suddenly very doubtful as 
to whether the machine could lift, without spilling, his two hun- 
dred pounds, and he expressed this doubt to Paulhan, Informing 
him of his weight. But the aviator was quick to reassure him, 
and with these words: 

"I have often carried that much dead weigh! before," he said. 



tor. couldn't have Sown when he didn't know how — the first day 
of the aviation meet. Since Georgie is supposed to he somewhat 
of a high-flier himself, it is apparently up to us to take his word 
for it — though it is up to hilt) also, if he would not stand a 
poseur, to prove to us conclusively the power and altitude of his 
own wings. At the same time, we think thai Ins commercial in- 
stinct for advertising will carry him far. We are not sure but 
he would have made a howling success writing advertising verses. 
As for the atheism or materialism of Jack London, we trust that 
like most of London's other material it is not plagiarism. 

» » * 

This little story comes by a confidential channel from Judge 
Mogan's court in connection with the peace negotiations between 
Lloyd Osborne, stepson of the late Robert Louis Stevenson, and 
his wife. Mrs. Katherme Osborne. The two. with the aid of 
their attorneys, were trying to settle marital differences ami re- 
turn to mutual happiness again. 

.Mrs. Osborne, it seems, is not only a woman of great pride, 
lull nf deep feeling, and at one stage of the proceedings, sin' was 
very much overwrought. What troubled the lady most was thai 
her husband should have turned out somewhat different from 
what she had expected. "Why." she hurst out, "I fancied him BO 
good that when I heard him swear first I thought it was the par- 
rot i Nat had taught him." 

* * * 

In Judge Sewcll's court the other day. James A. was granted 
a divorce from Eloise Brown. In regard in his right of getting 

it. there can he no doubt, considering the follow Jul: : 

"Ami there are other ways." .-aid .lanes A., after idling of her 

infidelity, "in which she did not use me well. For one thing. 
-he was -o afraid of burglars that every time she heard a noise 
at night she would rout me out and chase lownstairs to in- 
vest igate." 

"Why didn't you explain to her." suggested Judge Sewell, 
"thai a clever burglar would make no noise?" 

"I did." returned James A., "hut it only made it worse. After 
that she would rout me out every lime -he didn't hear a noise." 

* * * 

Tin' success of the navigation school, which is a part of the 

San Francisco public school system, has been del istrated by 

the demand for it. a demand which has just been satisfied by its 
enlargement and added facilities. When this navigation school 
was first established, the News Letter strongly commended it, 
as well as its aide head, Mr. J. T. McMillan, Nautical Experl of 
the C S. Hydrograohie Office, and a former officer of the na\y. 
than whom there is no better navigator, both theoretical and prac- 
tical, in this city. Under Mr. McMillan's able manage nt. the 

school has produced some able navigators lor our merchant 

marine, much more competent men than most, of those "gradu- 
ated" by the rule-of-thumb so-called navigation schools which arc 
loo ii ii men uis in all of our seaport cities. The undoubted growth 

• if the American merchant marine, particularly in the Pacific 

Ocean, makes a wide demand for just such good navigators as 

tin- local public navigation school turns out. 



There is a very tiny girl at the Palace 
Hotel with her parents, who is very popu- 
lar among the guests. One of her many 
gentlemen admirers took her in to the ball 
given by the Naval Militia of California 
at the hostelry last Wednesday night, and 
enjoyed a two-step with her. When it was 
over, the child, who is very young, was in- 
troduced to Mrs. Thomas A. Berry, wife 
of the General, and the lady inquired of 
the little blue-eyed miss how she liked it — 
meaning the spectacle. 

The child stared for a long moment, and 
then pointed out a lieutenant in uniform. 

"I would like it better," she said, "if 
they would keep out the bell-boys." 

George Sterling, the poet, is getting 
himself into print quite regularly these 
days. He was heard taking the part of 
Jack London recently in a controversy 
with a certain divine as to whether or not 
Jack London had a right to be an atheist. 
and just a day or two ago he came forth 
again, assuring us that Paulhan, the avia- 



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.1 \M \l:v 29. 191.0. 



and California Advertiser 



It, is natural that a new Mayor, representing policies quite op- 
posed to those of his predecessor should desire at least the lead- 
Log men of liis administration to be in complete harmony with 
him. Willi men on the various municipal commissions committed 
to policies not in perfecl agreemenl with his own. he would doubt- 
less find himself considerably hampered. Obviously, he would 
want his lieutenants to be men in thorough accord with him. 
Finding, upon entry into office, that certain commissioners, ap- 
pointed by the predecessor who was opposed to him in practically 
everything, were not prepared to act in concert with him or to 
i-iiii out his ideas, it was to be expected that the new Mayor 
would seek to replace them with men of his own choosing. 

Reasonable as such changes may be, it is nevertheless open to 
question whether they should lie made wholesale ami suddenly. 
Many of the commissioners whose resignations have been asked 
by Mayor McCarthy are unusually capable men; certainly they 
are honest in their convictions and faithful in the performance of 
their duties as they perceive them. Why should they all be let 
out en masse? Radical changes of this character are not calcu- 
lated to maintain the smooth running of the municipal machine 
or to impress the public with the Mayor's self-control. There is 
in them a suggestion of impetuosity hardly in keeping with 
Mayoral dignity. It might be better to make the removals gradu- 
ually and without theatrical sensation. 

The future will show the degree of wisdom exhibited by the 
Mayor in his choice of commissioners. His good taste in the 
manner of making the revolution is open to question. 

A sign of the times is the growth in popularity in this city of 
the cafe chant cmt. A low order of this has long been the vogue 
in the red-light district, on the Barbary Coast, lint with the New 
Year, the belter class of such places of combined refreshment and 
amusement has come into being, in good sections of the city. As 
has recently been truly said, people will soon be observing that 
"Paris is (lie San Francisco of Europe." We San Franciscans 
take our pleasures gladly, not sadly, and can amuse ourselves as 
well as recover quickly from the greatest disaster in history. 

* * * 

Richard Le Gallienne, the noted poet, was entertaining a group 

id' magazine editors to lunchenn in New York. To a compliment 

upon'liis tame, Mr. Le Gallienne said lightlj : 

"Bui what, is poetical fame in Ibis age of prose? Onlj yes- 
terday a schoolboy came and asked for nn autograph. I 

assented willingly. And to-day ai breakfast time the boj 
presented himself. 

"'Will you give me your autograph, sir?' he said. 

" 'But,' saul 1. 'I gave you m\ n pesterda} .' 

" ' I swopped that and a dollar,' be inswered, 'for the nito 

of .lames Jeffries.' " 

* * « 

Jim Jeffries was talking !<■ a reporter about the pu 
$101,000 that goes to the « inner of the Jeffries-Johnson battle. 

"Oh, no," said the herculean young man. "it isn't an I normous 

one for Ajnerica. We look at money in such a large u,n here. 

"Coming over on the boat, I heard two Chicago men talking in 
the bar. 

'"Which would you rather l» ■':' Baid one of them, 'very rich or 
very poor?' 

"'Neither.' said, thi other, in native way. 'Give me 

my choice and I'd ha\ - 5,000, I.' " 



"Stick to the farm." gays the president to thi «rii 

fanner hoy. then he hi. ~ him back to his white house 
its ail of rustic joy. "Smk to the farm," says the ra Iroad king 
lad who looks afar, then hikes him back on thi double- 
quick to his rustic private ear. "Si 

youth on the worm Fence perch. ; 
ear to the ground, to hgar a call hurch. "S 

farm." says the doctor, w - who would DP 

then hies him where the appen in bountiful ■ 

cut 



ska: "What i< becoming of the family?' 



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San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 



th® N®w jfcfc Clwb 



By Haeetett Watson Capwell. 



The riotous warblings of the San Francisco Music Club 
found echo in print several weeks ago. We. ourselves, stoodrbolt 
upright for seve-al columns before the prodigy of religious inn! 
erance in an organization dedicated to music. Instead of ;i 
faded episode laid away in lavender, (lie affair lias caused a 
schism and a new musical organization lias been effected. The 
rent in the old club could npt be mended — it was a ripped seam 
in an overwrought faction of the club, and the entire fabric ol 
the organization has been weakened in consequence. 

It will be. recalled that the trouble started with two notes 
sent by the secretary of the board of directors to Jewish candi- 
dates for membership. It was distinctly slated that the list of 
associate members was closed to Jewish candidates although they 
.would be received as active members. Which mean! that Jewish 
musical talent would be tolerated, but Jewish people could not 
further augment the audience which applauds the talent. I hi e 
are some three hundred members in the organization, and of that 
number only forty answer to the Jewish roll call, and thirty-five 
out of the forty are active members — women of musical ability, 
(live a broad-minded accountant these figures to work with, and 
lie will convince you that they do not add up right. The per- 
centage of Jewish members is so small that only a directorate 
with swaddled religious principles could make such a ruling. 

When the affair was first given publicity, it was discussed in 
these columns, hut since 'hen there have been new developments 
warmly splashed with humor which relieve the opaquely black 
gulfs beyond. The secretary of the board of directors was Miss 
Helen Heath, and in that capacity she wrote the notes that proved 
a juggernaut riding down the hearts and hopes of the most tal- 
ented members of the club. But Miss Heath had other vents 
for her musical ability besides serving as a secretary, and chief 
among these vents was a place in the choir of a Jewish syna- 
gogue. The rabbi of the synagogue tactfully gave Miss Heath 
an opportunity to deny that she concurred with the ruling of the 
board whose wish she penned — and Miss Heath promptly re- 
signed from the musical organization, thereby retaining her 
place in the choir of the synagogue. 

Meanwhile, Mrs. Camilla Frank Stich called a meeting of the 
Jewish members at her house, and they decided to resign in a 
hody. Mrs. Stich is the soprano in the First Congregational 
Church, and had been one of the most, active and talented of the 
Jewish members in the musical organization. She and her fol- 
lowing argued that, all things considered, the board had gone out 
of its way to put a slight upon them, and there was no further 
excuse for them to vivify the musical existence of the club. 

The other week an open meeting of the club was called, and 
some 2-10 members responded. The action that the board of 
directors had taken in ruling out associate Jewish members was 
kneaded and worked, and swung hick and forth like mo 
taffy at a country candy pull. Finally the sticky question was 
put: "How many members uphold the ruling of the board?" 
Just seven women out of the two hundred and forty present 
stood — the others (irmly kept their seats and overwhelmingly 
voiced the negative. Do not imagine that the directors tried to 
swing the vote the other way. If you are looking for easy ex- 
ploration, go pin your bonnet to the South Pole or find the egg 
of the great auk to chop with shallots for the salad, or 
pterodactyls for the market; no one of these tasks is so difficult 
as to fasten the action of that board on individual members. Mrs. 
Oscar dishing, the president, indignantly denies that shi 
in any way responsible for the action taken by the hoard, and 
the other members either accommodate their expressions to the 
circumference of the horizon when the subject is mentioned, or 
deny that they were in sympathy with the action. It would ap- 
pear that they are playing "button, button, who has the button" 
with responsibility, so that it is impossible to tag any one with it. 

Right here is where a flash of humor illuminates the proceed- 
ings. The meeting of the club over, the Jewish membi rs were 
advised that only seven out of 210 present upheld the ruling 
of the board, and they were urgently begged to reconsider then- 
resignations. This request was further propped up by an infor- 



mal admission that the notes were an error ui_ judgment, the 
action of the hoard having been planned as a secret standard by 
which ni'\v candidates should be measured. Could anything he 
funnier than this admission offered as a salve? All Jewish ap- 
plicants for associate membership were to be refused admittance, 
but they were not to know the true reason for the refusal ! The 
notes which Miss Heath penned were altogether too frank and 
straightforward. Is it any wonder that the Jewish members re- 
fused to reconsider their resignations, and that a number of Gen- 
tile members have likewise signified* their intention of withdraw- 
ing from the club and joining the new organization? 

Oscar Wiel. the director of the San Francisco Music Club, 
has also joined the defection. "Why should you resign — you are 
not a member — you are a paid musical director?" asked an offi- 
cer. "That's just (lie reason." gravely responded Mr. Wiel. 
The new club, which is iii process of organization, will be non- 
sectarian, and hopes to he a power in the musical uplift of the 
city. 

This affair has been watched with abounding interest by all 
the clubs in the city. Ruthlessly it rubs in the responsibility of 
a board of directors. Only seven out of two hundred and forty 
members upheld the action which has caused internal strife and 
defection. This sluh has now passed a rule that in the future 
the board shall not lake any action without first obtaining the 
concurrence of the club body. That is one effective way of safe- 
guarding the opinion o|' an entire club, but another and even 
more admirable way is to choose a governing body which is cap- 
able of realizing that it must consider the opinion and pleasure 
of the club in every action which it takes. A sale and sane board 
of directors iaf.es the pulse of the club before writing a prescrip- 
tion. Each member of the club realizes that she is merely a dele- 
gate to the committee to express the views of her constituents, 
The board of directors of the San Francisco Music Club evidently 
did not take the trouble or were not capable of taking the pulse 
of the club. They framed up a law and when circumstances forced 
it upon the attention of the entire club, only about three per 
cent of the membership stood for the ruling. There is doubtless 
room in this city for more than one musical organization of this 
sort, and it would be a pity to sec the San Francisco Music Club 
split upon the rocks toward which it navigated with all sails full 
set. I do not believe that it will sink. Under proper guidance 

il will find a safe and tranquil harbor. The new club may pioie 
a -iiinulus to the old organization, and in time the rift in 
Orpheus's lute may be mended. 



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January 29, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 




PLEAME'SliND 




e TU> etyjv a*>i) {aF&OBiei— £./%**) 



By Paul Gerson. 

Marie < 'ahill ai the Columbia. 

Blithe and buxom Marie Cahill is-' with us again. Her new 
offering is charmingly musical and scenically effective. It gives 
the star much the same opportunities she had in "Marrying 
Mary," which she gave us some two years ago. Her work and 
her methods remind lis of Marie Dressier in her palmiest days. 
There is the same energy and quick, snappy retorts, and play of 
features. She simply grows on yon. Her personality seems to 
radiate joviality and brightness, to disseminate conviviality of 
spirits and happiness. She has the knack of making yon forget 
your cares and to enter with her into the land of fun. Her touch 
is so natural that it. does not seem like acting al all. There is no 
apparent and evident effort to get her effects. Cleorge Hohart. 
who is responsible for the hook and lyrics, has evidently not spent 
many sleepless nights in developing a plot of any consequence, 
though the lines he has allotted to Miss Cahill are unusually 
bright and witty. Owing to the slightness of the aforesaid plot, 
the libretto is liberally padded to fill out the three aids, and much 
irrelevant dialogue is introduced. The author, however, has 
madc a determined and partially successful effort to get away 




ill, in -The Boys and Betty." at the Columbia. 




Mis. /.rslir Carter OS Vasta llrilir nl I li r Ymi NeSS I'll': 

from in any of the ordinary conventionalities of the standard 

musical comedies. The play i- crowded with pretty bits of busi- 

cd a few really meritorious situations. Mr. Silvio Eein, 
who is responsible for the music has done some praiseworthy 
work. It is of the tinkly-jingly kind, reminiscent in the highest 

. Many of the numbers have real melodic value, and one 
in particular, the "Arab Love Song," has rybthm and lilt of a 
most engaging quality. This latter was encored time and again, 
and proved beyond doubt the popular Dumber of the evening. 
Betty is an American ftirl married to B Parisian composer who is 
selfish and egotistical to a degree, she is beloved of On 
dents, and is a general favorite with pi her hus- 

band, who. Parisian-like, has his other love affairs to look after. 
which interest him more than his American wife. Dl 

■I), she opens a shop in Paris, and leaves her husbai 
site hopi id. Aided by a wealthy American and his daugh- 

ter, who have interested themselves in her 
beyond her expectation*. When all is going line, the h 
materializes and claims his share of her prosperity, which, ac- 
cording to the French law. - him. The wife, 
in the meantime, learns of his infatuation with I 
dancer, and refuses to aid him. Through the m 

je luck ami a irreat deal o anient 

is all straightened out. the American girl re-marries, and this 
time to the man of her choice. The Parisian at- 
maintained, the three acts taking place in I Mi-- 

Cahil] has a manner of rapid delivery which ■- 
tire, some of her best dialogue being .n this 

account, especially thos rear of the ho 

unusually keen and a!. itch it ill. 3 

maker, though, and can make vou 1 we wink of 

lash or a funnv gesture. 
She has thee 
and pretty, and who work I easore that 

nmenselv to make the w ! 

in tlie main. Mr. 
Itudolph ( i ruber. 

inely funnv. H f the few 

cast of this play. His boon companions who constitute "'The 







10 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 



Boys." are "capably done by Lucien Kesney, Kenneth Davenport 
and Edward Earle. Sam Hardy does the disagreeable husband 
very effectively. Wallace McOutcheon, Jr., is a manly young 
lover. W. G. Stewart uses his big basso to good advantage in 
several good musical interpolations. He incidentally manages the 
stage in a most satisfactory manner. Hattie Fox is charming as 
Major Gordon's daughter. A lady with tin' doubtful euphonious 
name of Miss Ann Mooney. does some very effective dancing, and 
later plays a character bit very well. The costuming is pretty 
throughout, and as has already been stated, a positive effort has 
been made in all departments to get away from the old traditions 
of the usual musical comedy. Much praise should be accorded 
the scenic embellishment, the opening set in particular being 
fraught with atmosphere, and the se.cond set is charming ; n its 
brishtness and color, the whole providing a background for spir- 
ited action altogether pleasing to the eye. We cordially invite al 
Invers of pure, legitimate fun to see Miss Cahill. It is a merry 
evening of good, wholesome entertainment. She should do rwd 
weeks of splendid business, as in her previous visit sin- made her- 
self a pronounced favorite, and her present vehicle is. if anything. 
a big improvement when compared 1" "Marrying Mary." Mr. 
Ilein, the composer, conducted an enlarged orchestra. 
* * * 

Louis J.a/mes at the Van Ness. 

Shakespeare's "Henry the Eighth" is not exactly crammed full 
of dramatic possibilities. There are dreary wastes of dialogue, 
and the usual theatre-goers, unless they are Shakespearean stu- 
dents, will find the play dull indeed, fn the present production 
Mr. - T ames, of course, enacts the role of Cardinal Wolsey. James 
is wi hout doubt one of our very best interpreters of Shakespeare, 
lint lie should keep strictly away from parts for which lie is en- 
tirely unsuited, which is the ease in the present instance. He 
brings all his long experience in the legitimate to bear, but there 
is no gainsaying the fact that, as the Cardinal, lie is heavy and 
cumbersome to a degree. He does not seem to hold one even for a 
moment, and lie dees not seem to know how to use his big line 
voice to the best advantage. Even in his splendid speech o'n am- 
bition, he was a distinct disappointment. We have not seen him 
as Shylock, but we venture the assertion that he would till the 
role with much greater success than he does the wily Cardinal. 
To the writer. James seems an unfortunate theatrical proposi- 
tion. It is some years since he has been in a successful environ- 
ment as regards bis choice of plays, and this is too bid. as there 
is no question but that he is an actor of great capability, though 

lacking noticeably in magnetism; Tlis company, with o i 

two exceptions, is well-nigh hopeless. He should assemble them 
some bright mornins and read them Hamlet's advice to the plac- 
ers, and then tell them to go and ponder thereon long and ear- 
nestly. It is a known fact that von. cannot make a Shakespeare: 
actor. They must be horn. Sonic time ago a prominent Eastern 
critic took occasion to give a rather harsh review of Mr. RobSrt 
Mantell's supporting company in bis Shakespearean plays, and 
Mr. Mantell answered by slating ibat if the aforesaid critic would 
find him any better Shakespearean actors, he would be willing to 
pay them any salary that they asked, lie will not go so far and 
say that this is also true of Mr. James: that is. ibat he procured 
the best actors he could secure. Some are hopelessly bad, others 
are mediocre, and one or two are quite decent. Miss A|iliie 

1:1 s r, ' arls her lines intelligently, though at times she becomes 

positively declamatory and artificial. Her side is followed I.-. 
the majority of the companv, giving the whole an atmosphere of 

"" ''">'■ and the stilted methods become jarrii i 'a 

sensibilities m time. If Mr. James expects to make an emphatic 
bid lor popular approval and patronage, be inii-i work along dif- 
ferent lmes. He must consider his public as well a- himself 
"Henry the Eighth" is an unfortunate choice, as ii is dull to the 
point of desperation, and altogether devoid of action. Ii allows 

tew any opportunity for real work, and those chances to, I 

work which are offered are invariably spoiled by utterly bad' elo- 
cution. Mr. James will yet come into his own. He is to,, good 
an actor to go groping in the dark in this way. He has his place 
in the dramatic world, and be should fill a very large place In 
these days our legitimate and Shakespearean actors are few and 
tar between, and Mr. James is one of the yerv best we have left 
May he yet find his medium which will bring him desei 
success. 

Paul Gekson. 



"Mary Jane's Pa" at the Savoy. 

Max Figman is drawing packed houses at the Savoy. Nothing 
in an amusement way has quite caught the public fancy as this 
delightful artist in his odd and attractive play. It is one of the 
pleasant surprises of the dramatic season, and the immense audi- 
ences demonstrated that San Francisco still knows how to ap- 
preciate the finest in art when it is presented. Mr. Figman him- 
self has been as much a surprise as his play. He has demon- 
strated that he is a consummate master of his art, and has the 
quality and facility of drawing the tears as well as provoking the 
smiles. His performance of the ne'er-do-well, who is transformed 
by bis love of wife and children into a nobler member of society. 
is a gem of histrionic achievement. And all the credit is not 
due to the "star," for the company is evenly balanced. It is al- 
most unfair to mention a single name in preference to another. 
However, perhaps those who reached the heart most are Helen 
Laekaye as "Portia Perkins ;" Gretehen Hartman as little "Mary 
Jane;" Dorothy Phillips as "Lucille," and Edwin Chapman as 
"Link Watkins," who drives the 'bus and acts as reporter for the 
"'( iarion" at the same time. The scenes are all laid in Indiana, 
and so faithfully are the characters drawn and so complete the 
atmosphere of the play, it would seem as though some little vil- 
lage had been transplanted from the Hoosier State and removed 
bodily to the stage of the Savoy Theatre. As a panacea for all 
trouble and an evening of unalloyed enjoyment, nothing will 
fill the bill better than a visit to the Savoy Theatre to see Max 
Figman and his company in "Mary Jane's Pa." 

* * * 

"All on Account of Eliza" at the Alcazar. 

A. Burt Wesnef made his re-appearance at the Alcazar Thea- 
tre this week in "All on Account of Eliza." He played the part 
of Franz Hochstuhl, the old German. Both the play and Wesner 
were received with enthusiasm. At the end of the second act 
he was compelled to make a little speech, in which he declared 
that he had learned a lesson. Last September he thought he 
wanted to travel in a road show, but now he knew that if they 
would let him, he was going to stay at the Alcazar until he died. 




Julius Steger, who' will appear in the new musical dramatic 
playlet. "The Way to the Heart," this Sunday matinee al the 
Orpheum. 



January 29, 1910. 



'and California Advertiser 



11 



He was at his best with his broken English and clever charac- 
terization of the German mannerisms, and il is difficult to imag- 
ine a better presentation of the part. 

Evelyn Vaughan was well cast as the school teacher. How she 
won over the chairman of the school board, despite the anvil 
chorus, led by Bessie Barriscale, who enacted the part of Miss 
Sallie Haskins. spinster and proud possessor of a hair-lip, is a 
part el' the comedy. She sang some soothing "coon" lullabies 
which wen such approbation that she was compelled to do it 
all over again, although she protested in the informal manner 
familiar to Alcazar patrons. 

John B. Ince played the part of the lover. As the son of 
the school board's chairman he made things extremely interest- 
ing for all concerned in the plot to prevent bis marrying the 
teacher. 

Bessie Barriscale gave one of the best character disguises ever 

seen on the Alcazar stage, for it was with difficulty that she was 

recognized. Will Walling, Adele Belgarde, B. L. Bennison and 

Howard Hickman also played well, and helped to make the play 

success I'ul. 

* * * 

The Or/ilir.iun. 

This week's programme at (he Orpheum has been fully up to 
the usual high standard of that playhouse, being characterized, 
indeed, by more than the ordinary amount of variety. A novel 
feature was the appearance of Vilmos Westony, who may be 
dubbed a musical comedian. He possesses Hie decidedly rare 
combination of high musical ability with a genuine sense of 
humor. He is at once a pianist of high degree and a, laughable 
entertainer. Often these musical kings are bores lo the average 
seeker after light entertainment, but Westony is brimful of gay- 
ety as well as of music of both high and low degree. 

The Pour "Readings constitute one of the best acrobatic teams 
seen in this city fo'- a long time. Their act was clean cut and 
swift throughout. 

The Ushers, who are old friends, combined comedy and seri- 
ousness in their little act, which appealed strongly to the audi- 
ences. They are a good team, especially Fannie. 

Cook and Stevens did the black-face comedy in approved and 
original manner, and their act. while of an old general type, 
was original in the details of its presentation. 

'I'bi' eight Geishas, hold-overs from Ihe week- before, earned 
the same appreciation from the audience as given ibem upon 
their first appearance. 

Blanche Lillian Kaplan's piano recital a! ile Van Ness Thea- 
tre Sunday afternoon was a great success, artistically and other- 
wise. In the boxes and auditorium, which were well Idled. 

lo be seen many of 8an Francisco's elite. The little girl cer- 
tainly merited the enthusiastic applause accorded her. The pro- 
gramme, which included several of the mosl brilliant selections 

known to music, gave her an oppor! unit \ lo display to the fn 

possible advantage her wonderful teohniq ] true was 

this of Chopin's brilliant Fantasia Impromptu, which she in- 
vested with almost heroic pn S. G. Fleishman, her 
teacher, is certainly entitled to great credit for the painstaking 
thoroughness which this little artiste exhibits. A great future 

Should be in store for her. The many flowers and other S 

which the lit lie girl received Sunday afternoon show thai 
has many admiring friends in this city. 



she became famous. The only matinee at the Van Ness during 
the Carter week will be given on Saturday. 

Julius Sieger will re-appear at the Orpheum next week, and 
present a new musical dramatic playlet entitled "The Way to the 
Heart." It is from a German source, and has been adapted by 
Ruth Comfort Mitchell. 

Gua Bdwards' "Kentucky Kids" will appear in a rural musical 
comedy in one act, called "Miss TJose's Birthday." 

August Prato's Simian Cirque will also he included in the com- 
ing attractions. It consists of four monkeys, who act as jockeys, 
do high school riding and sommersaults mounted on four im- 
mense dogs who are disguised as ponies. 

Arthur Whitelaw, known in theatrical circles as "The Irish 
American," will indulge in a monologue. 

Next week will be the last of Claude and Fannie Usher in their 
successful slang classic, "Pagan's Decision," and also of the Four 
Headings, Cook and Stevens, and trie. Hungarian Pianoforte Phe- 
nomenon, Vilmos Westony. 

* * * 

Max Figman will continue for one week more at the Savoy, 
commencing Sunday afternoon, in his delightful comedy, "Mary 
Jane's Pa." The following attraction at the Savoy will be Miss 
Pose Melville in her quaint character, "Sis Hopkins." 

* * * 

Marie Cahill in "The Boys and Betty," will occupy the boards 
at the Columbia Theatre for one more week, with one matinee 
on Saturday. Commencing February 7th, Robert Mantoll will 
appear in an extensive repertoire. 



Owing to the great rush of applicants for appointment, 

and the detail work growing so rapidly, John J. I 'cane. Super- 
visor of Census for the Fourth District of California, has bees 
compelled to get larger quarters. 1 1 is new address is 507, 
Chronicle Building. 



Columbia Theatre 



Corner Geary and Mason Sts. 
Phone Franklin 160. 
Home C 5783. 



Gottlob. Marx & Co., Managers. 

Nightly, including Sunday. Matinee Saturday. Second and a I 
week begins Monday, Januan 81st Daniel V. fcrthur presents 

MARIK CAIIILL, in her musical »oiiud\ SUCCeSS, 

THE BOYS AND BETTY. 
I Tires— $2, $1.50, $1. 50c. 
February 7th— ROBERT MANTELL in repertoire of fourteen plays. 



Van Ness Theatre co A T oho" 



ESS AVh. 



Gottlob, Marx & Co., Managers. 

Phones: Market 600 — Home S 1B61 

One week, beginning Monday night. January :i*i. Only n 

s ,i 1 1 r. i. i \ | U] ,-. ! [on ol Mi> i In--. 

MRS. LESLIE CARTER 

has the honor of presenting "VAS'i'A MKRN'K." her new i 

morals and emotions. 

Next— Blanche Walsh In "The Test." 



Alcazar Theatre 



Sutter and Steiner Streets. 
Phones— West 1100. Home S. 4242. 

Belasco and Mayer. Owners and Managers. 

Monday evening. January -1st. and throughout the week, Edward 

s dramatization of Maurice Thompson's widely-read 
Colonial tin 

ALICE OF OLD VlNCENNES. 
Prices— Night. 36c. to $1 Mai 
Matinee Satui 



Savoy Theatre 



Phones Market i$o 
Home J »8aa 



ADV INGE ANTIOUNCBMB* i 

Edward B. Rose's dramatization of Maurice Thompson's fam- 
ous tale of revolutionary times. '•Alice of Old Vincennes," "ill 
be the Alcazar's hill during the coming week, commencing M 
day evening. The play was last presented in thi 
half a dozen years age, when it ran three consecutr 

Elaborate staging is premised. The rirsl 
side the Rousillon House, the second is inside that hostelry, ^rj 

third Show. Colonel Hamilton's headquarters at F - l\eW Urp/l 

and the final seeiies are laid in Alice's home. 

••The M.m of the Hour" is announced as the play to 
* » • 

\ roost interee announcement is that Mrs 

Carter is to appear at the Van \>s- Theatre on Mori 
remain there for one week onlv, presenting a new play by Ed- 

: lVple. a problem drama of modern life and en 
" The ptav affords Mrs, I 
tunity of her career for the display of that histTionism for which 



McAllister, near Market. 

Second fluid lasl freak, starting 

Other matin- anil Saturday. Mr. John Cort pi 

the eminent comedian. 

MAX FIGMAN. 

in his latest and - 

•MARY JAN! lith Kills. 1 

of the season. The talk of the town. 

Night. $i.5> .pular matinees Thursday. 75c. 50c. 

Next Week— Bone M the delightful pastoral plav 

in IPKDJS." 



eUVYL "Terrell Street, 

Wfftv b,.^ Stockton end Powell. 

Safest and Most MaruifieeiM Theatre in Aaaerics 

ginning THIS BUND A 1 -y day. 

ARTISTIC VAUDEVILLE 
Jl'I.irs STEGER and H 
nramatlc Pl:i 

. RY KII'S. 
THI'R W'HITKI.AV. igani 



* scats. * 
• Sundays and holidays) 10c.. 36c. 50c Phone Pous;- 



12 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 191U. 



®P5?%T 





0CffiTY 



The society woman if very frequently almost convinced thai 
she lias projected her astral body in places which her materia! 
self wots not of. For instance, she picks up the morning paper 
the while hex maid brushes her detached tresses, and aftci lan- 
guidly deciding that she will wear her new $50 braid, she turn 
her attention to the society column. There she reads thai sin 
has hostessed an elaborate luncheon, and all the pretty hand-made 
adjectives in the reporter's* vocabulary are used to conjure up 
the fascinating scene. Madame wonders .whether her memory 

has packed up its duds and moved out, for sin- does i - 

nize herself in the capacity of a hostess al a flower perfumed 
table. She has about decided to ring up the doctor and lake the 
sanitorium rest cure which he has prescribed, when her thinker 
under the turban and braid begins to work. "Why, yes, f did 
have luncheon yesterday al the St. Francis," she reminds her- 
self. "I wanted the girls to come to the Palace with me, but 
Jennie Crocker said 'Come on in here.' and Virginia Jolliffe and 
Helen Eastland backed her up, so we went in. Afterwards we 
squabbled about who should treat for the luncheon, and Jennie 
won out by signing the check before we could prevent her. Yes, 
and there were two roses on the table that did their best in a 

ise thai worked hard to look like crystal." 

A well known woman actually repeated the foregoing soliloquy 
to me. The daily papers have regular "beats" for their society 
reporters, who "cover" the hotels in the same large and imag- 
inative spirit that the small boy recounts his first trial with a 
shot-gun. They make the rounds of the smart hotels during the 
luncheon hour, and a casual lunch becomes an elaborate and 
premeditated feast under the guidance of an enthusiastic pen. 
As a result, people are constantly going through the experience 
that I have just recorded. The other day a merry Andrew wag 
of the Burlingame Club, who is exceedingly affable, was ap- 
proached by a reporter who had occasion to know thai his wife 
kept her information in a refrigerator from which she could 
bring it out at a moment's notice, perfectly intact, bul thor- 
oughly congealed. 

"Won't you tell me where you are going to entertain your 
guests at dinner preceding the Greenway?" 

"Certainly." responded Sir Affable, "we're going to take them 
to 'The Sign of the Fried Chop' for dinner, and afterwards bring 
'em around here to the Palace and let Vm pick their teeth!" 

"Professor Napoleon" has created a llnrrv in late suppers. 

Every night after the performance 'I afes are crowded with 

the gay young amateurs, who discuss a succulent repast with as 
much enthuiiasm as the merits of the various acts. To-night, 
Saturday, there will he fiesta suppers gab, re in honor of the 
passing of the "Dream." Emile Bruguiere has asked a number 

of friends to a supper and a private hearing of 31 new music 

he has written. "The supper is sure to be good," says this young 
man, who is tolerant about the interest most friends take in one's 
own compositions. There was the famous dim ave at 

Monterey to a choice circle of wits assembled for the pur] i 

hearing the musical rustlings of the host's winss. But the din- 
ner was so good and lasted so long that the young m 
finally suggested that it was time to adjourn to' the piano. Tie 
suggested the same thing at half hour intervals, and finally, 
with the air of a Spanish grandee parceling out a section of Mon- 
County, the painter in the party said. "Now. Mealy (cham- 
pagne for Emile), don't you mind us; you just run along and 
tackle the ivories. We won't care in the least— we can shut the 
doors if you play too loud." 

To those who have been on the "inside," the neat and finished 
production of "Professor Napoleon" came as a complete surprise. 

All has not been as serene during rehearsals as a su r sky 

in fact, the atmosphere most of the time resembled aviation 
r. You cannot foregather some five hundred amateurs 
without stirring up their dispositions, and it took superhuman 
tact to keep the cast from disorganizing. Mrs. Norman McLaren 
was the sponsor of the production— she it was who went to Los 



Palace Hotel Company 

presents the 

PALACE HOTEL 

entirely rebuilt since the fire 

FAIRMONT HOTEL 

in its superb situation as superior examples of 
modern hotel building and hotel keeping. 

JOHN C. KIRKPATRICK, Managing Director 



Angeles and engaged the people to come up here and give it. 
Early in the game she engaged the services of Mrs. C. 0. Alex- 
ander, who promised to see that society with a large S was repre- 
sented in the cast. She fulfilled her promise, but not without 
strenuous exertions. At the last minute, the college alumnae 
recruited from the Stanford and Berkeley alumnae, threatened 
to withdraw because they had not understood thai they were to 
furnish their own Colonial costumes for the minuet. It took 
finesse to coax them back into the cast — and to bring them to a 
state of mind where they cheerfully put up for their own cos- 
tumes, it is hoped that the people who profit by the Free Dis- 
pensary on Telegraph Hill will appreciate the Herculean efforts 
that were made to fill the coffers of the Dispensary of which Miss 
Elizabeth Ashe is the guiding spirit. 

Instead of relaxing under the strain of the charity production, 
society has expended its energies in many directions. Monday 
did not show a touch of its birthday color — blue. In the after- 
noon, Mrs. Russell Rogue entertained at the third of her series 
of bridge parties, and the evening was a gay one for the voting 
people whii foregathered at the home of Mrs. Harriett P. Millar 
and danced down the twinkling hours that ended with a delicious 
supper. 

On Tuesday. Mrs. E. A. Selfridge entertained at a tea, which 
brought out all the exclusive set with which the Selfridges are 
identified. Pretty Margaret Doe gave the debutante set a lunch- 
eon at the Palace, and as most of the girls were to take part in 
the charily production in the evening, there was much merriment 
over the "stage careers" before them. 

Friday was more versatile. There were bridge parties, to be 
sure, with Mrs. Samuel Boardman, Mrs. Harry Nathaniel Gray, 
Mrs. Walter Remington Quick, and Mrs. William YValdon each 
entertaining at bridge. But, besides, th re was the diversion of 
a tea presided over by Miss Gertrude Perry, and at night the 
Colonial masked bad was danced at the St. Francis under the 
guidance of Mrs. C. O. Alexander. Augmented by a number of 
the young people who earlier in the evening appeared in Pro- 
fessor Napoleon, the 'lancing was kept up until an unusually late 
hour. The maskers who bad taken part in the performance mys- 
tified their friends by "'swapping" costumes, which created much 
merriment. 

To-day, Saturday, is crowded to the last hour, beginning with 
Mrs. Charles Belshaw's bridge party: the second of Mrs. Grey's 
bridge parties : Dr. and Mrs. Kaspar Pisehels' reception; a musi- 
cale at the I te of Mr. and Mrs. William Mintzer: and the din- 
ner and supper parties attendant upon the final night of "Pro- 
fessor Napoleon." 



Nathan-Dohrmann Company 



SPECIALISTS IN 

CARD PRIZES 

POPULAR PRICED AND USEFUL 



UNION SQUARE, GEARY AND STOCKTON STREETS 



January 29, iflio. 



and California Advertiser 



13 



Sociaill m<& IP®rs@Bii(fflS femis 



Wednesday and Thursday were bridge days, Mrs. Charles Jos- 
selyn and Mrs. John P. Young each hostessing large bridge 
parties on Wednesday. On Thursday, Mrs. Henry L. Dodge 
gathered a number of' friends for the same diversion. 

The lobby of the Fairmont presented a beautiful sight on 
Monday afternoon, when all the clergy, the choirs, the vestry men 
and the hundreds of guests who were invited to attend the laying 
of the cornerstone of the new Grace Cathedral of San Francisco, 
assembled before going to the scene of the solemn ceremony on 
California street. The clergy assembled in the red room, and 
the choirs in the ball room, and the procession moved from the 
Sacramento street entrance of the hotel along Mason street, and 
out California. Over 1700 invitations for the ceremony were 
sent out, and included 104 bishops of the Episcopal Church of 
America, the entire Episcopal clergy of California, the entire 
clergy of San Francisco of all denominations, the justices of the 
Supreme Court, the Court of Appeals, Federal Judges in this 
city, and men and women prominent in the affairs of the church, 
as well as the delegates to the diocesan convention and the house 
of church women. The office for the laying of the stone was 
written especially for the occasion under the direction of Bishop 
Nichols. At eight o'clock in the evening, an elaborate dinner to 
Bishop Nichols and those who assisted him in the service was 
given in the red room of the Fairmont by the members of the 
vestry and the church. 

The gray room of the Fairmont was the scene of a brilliant 
luncheon on Tuesday, when Mrs. E. Doe, who is a permanent 
guest of the hotel, entertained two score of her friends. The 
guests assembled in Mrs. Doe's apartments, and then came down 
to the gray room, where luncheon was served. As a place which 
meets every social requirement, where things are done as they 
should be, the Fairmont appeals irresistibly to those who ap- 
preciate. 

Mrs. George D. Toy gave a luncheon at the Hotel Manx on 
Tuesday last in honor of Mrs. Frank Baldwin, of Honolulu, who 
is a daughter of Mrs. Edward Kittridge, of Ibis city. The tape 
try room was used for the occasion, and was transformed into 
a bower of green. Table decorations were orchids. 
(Continued on Page H.) 



BLANCO 


9 


s 


O'FARRELL AND LARKIN STREETS 






PHONE FRANKLIN 9 






No visitor should leave the city without seeing the 


finest cafe in America. Car new annex 


is 


now 


open. 







15 • 1 **-» r» FRITZ MULLER & SONS 

Bismarck Cafe . pr °r etor t w 

Setting ( •p«ckv IsOO 
Leads in catering to San Francisco's epicures and music lovers 
POPULAR PRICES 
Music noon, evenings and after theatre by the famous Herr Ferdi- 
nand Stark's Vienna Orchestra 
PACIFIC BUILDING San Francisco MARKET AND FOURTH 



HOTEL POTTER 

Where San Francisco Society folk gather. 
MILO M. POTTER. Manager 

Santa Barbara 



HOTEL ST. FRANCIS 

UNDER THE MANAGEMENT OF JAMES 'WOODS 



TN introducing the European idea 
^ of a Buffet Luncheon this hotel 
believes it is presenting a service 
that will appeal pleasantly to San 
Francisco. 



_ 



Seattle's Newest and Most Modern Hotel 




HOTEL SAVOY 

SEATTLE 

"Twelve Stories of 

Solid Comfort" 

Building, concrete, 

steel and marble. 
In most fashionable 

shopping district. 
Bound magazines in 

reading room. 
Most refined hostelry 

in Seattle. 
Absolutely fireproof. 

Rates, 11.50 up 




UNEXCELLED TRAIN SERVICE 

DAILY TO AND FROM 

HOTEL DEL MONTE 

DEL MONTE EXPRESS, the through parlor car train, 
leaves San Francisco daily at 2:00 p. m. arriving at 
Del Monte at 5:43 p. m. 

DEL MONTE LOCAL leaves San Francisco at 3:00 p.m. 
daily arriving at Del Monte at 7:21 p. m. in time for 
dinner. 

An Ideal arrangement for week end parties 
H. R. WARNER. Manager Hotel Del Monte. California 



HOTEL VICTORIA 



N. E. cor. Bush and Stockton 

Centrally Located 



A Modern and Up-To-Date Family Hotel. Sun in Every Room. 

Elaborate Furnisninirs. Excellent Cuisine. Lartfe Lobby and 

Reception Room. Grill Room. Dinine Room 

Mrs. W. F. Morris. Proprietor, formerly of Hotel Cecil 

Bush Street. San Francisco 

European and American Plan 



Hotel Westminster 



Los Angeles, Cal 

Fourth ud Mai S*. 



American Plan 



REOPENED 



Rates par I 'ay 12.50 Roomt without Bath. 
Rooms with Bath. M00, 13 SO and MOO. 



European Plan 

11.00 p*r day and up 
With bath. It SO and up 



F. O. JOHNSON. Proprietor 



Hotel Normandie 

Sutter and Gough Streets 

A comfortable, high order, uptown hotel, now under the manage- 
ment of THOMAS H. SHEDDEN. formerly manager of Sx. 
Dunstan's. 



14 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 



SOCIAL AND PERSONAL ITEMS. 
(Continued from Page IS.) 

Society's interest in both charity and art was amply exhibited 
at the performance of "Professor Napoleon." The Valencia 
Theatre held a gathering of the elect that could not be sur- 
passed, either as regards its representative character or its im- 
posing array. It was quite the most notable affair that the ama- 
teur Thespians have undertaken since the Kirmess of last year. 
The production was as brilliant as the attendance and deserve I 
praise is given on all sides to the participants and the manage- 
ment. 

Mr. David H. Steiner, accompanied by his mother, Mrs. S. 
Steiner, and his sister, was at Del Monte Eor a few days last neck. 

Indicative of the strong hold the Palace has on the business 
men of the city are the regular luncheons which arc held their 
each week by the commercial organizations of the city. The 
California Promotion Committee meets its members each 
Friday here, and much benefit is derived from these informal 
gatherings. The Merchants' Association also meets here each 
week in an informal business meeting. The Cabinet, that not- 
able association of wits, humorists, statesmen, business men, poli- 
ticians, who have for years been assembling each noon around 
their own table in the restaurant, are still to be found in the old 
accustomed place, having returned with the opening of Hi'' doors. 
Besides these, there are dozens of tables at which may be found 
each day the men who, for the pleasure of good company, gather 

here with their own little coterie for the enjoyment of the n - 

day meal. Mumm is served as the wine of preference. 

One of the handsomest social events which has been held in 
the Palace was the dinner dance given by Mrs. Sigmund Stern 
and Mrs. E. S. Heller, on Friday evening. Dinner was served 
to the two hundred and more guests in the banquet room, after 
which they repaired to the golden ball room for the dancing. In 
beauty of appointment and decoration, this affair has set a new 
record in the society events of the city. 

Dr. Arthur Beardslee his returner! to his Waller street resi- 
dence in this city from a visit in the East. He spent some time 
in New York during his trip, and has now resumed his practice. 

Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Thayer, who are spending the winter in 
town, entertained during the week at dinner, a number of friends 
sharing their hospitality on Thursday last. Covers were laid in 
the private dining room of the lintel Victoria, where Mr. and 
Mrs. Thayer have apartments. 

Mrs. W. G. I.eland, accompanied by her son, is a recent arrival 
at the Hotel Victoria, where she is to spend several weeks. The 
Lelands are New York visitors. 

Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Doyle have closed their home at San 
Mateo and taken permanent quarters at the St. Francis. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Baoul-DuVal arrived Tuesday ai Del 
Monte for a week's stay, and it was expected that Mr. and Mrs. 
C. W. Clark, of San Mateo, would join them, business, however, 
preventing Mr. Clark from coming. 



SEA BATHS IN THE CITY. 

A sea bath right in the heart of the city is what is offered by 
the new Lurline baths, at Bush and Larkin streets. This estab- 
lishment is fitted with up-to-date equipment in every respect, and 
presents attractions as alluring to the eye as refreshing to the 
body.. There are not only hath tubs of latest pattern, but swim- 
ming pools in which the bather may take a plunge and swim in 
real ocean water. Every convenience in the way of dressing 
rooms, lounging room and the like is offered, and the location of 
the baths make them convenient to those living or doing business 
in the crowded sections. They are readily accessible, too, from the 
outlying districts. The baths are open every day and evening. 

The Lurline establishment also has branch tub baths at '.'I."'! 
Gear) street, near Devisadero street. 



Workman (in Socialist) — What's this 'ere socialism ye 

talks 30 much about? Socialist — Well, it's like this 'ere. Yer 
srels all the money in the country and divides it all up — each "l' 
us 'aving a share. Workman — Well, what would you do with 
your share? Socialist — Why, spend it like a man. Workman — 
What would you do then? Socialist — Well, we'd divide it all 
up again, of course. — .1/. .1. P. 



THE MARD1 GRAS BALL. 

The smart set is actively preparing for the Mardi Gras ball 
which will be held in the Pavilion Kink, Sutter ami Pierce 
streets, on the evening of February 8th, for the benefit of the 
Children's Hospital. All the leaders are represented in the move- 
ment toward making the affair a success, as it promises to be. 
Ned Greenway will lead the grand mare 1 ! ai !> p. m. Two bands 
will furnish continuous music. The boxes are to be sold at $20 
each; tickets for dancing and the midnight supper will be -$5, 
and for onlookers, including supper, $7. Sherman & ('lav are 
disposing of the tickets. A jeweled pin will he rallied .lining the 
evening for the benefit; of the hospital. The affair will nol be 
exclusive. Any one payiug the admission fee will he welcomed. 
Following are the committees: 

Floor Committee — Mr. George Cameron. Mr. Worthington 
Ames, Mr. Louis Sloss, Mr. J. 0. Tohin. Mr. Oscar Cooper, Mr. 
A. Lilly, Mr. Sidney Clonnan. Mr. Arthur G. Lilienthal, Mr. 
Jack Walter, Mr. Percy King. Mr. E. M. Greenway, Mr, Edgar 
Mizner, Mr. William O'Connor. Mr. Rofeert Eyre, Mr. Cos Tay- 
lor, Mr. Atherton Macondray, Mr. N. Harris.' Mr. George <'ad- 
wallader, Mr. L. J. Scott, Mr. Latham McMullin. Mr. Waller 
Martin. Mr. Silas Palmer, Mr. Percy Palmer. Mr. Gerald Rath- 
bone, Mr. Millard Barton. Committee for Judging Best Costumes 
— Leon Sloss, E. M. Greenway, Raphael Weill, G. A. Newhall. 



ELECTRIC SERVICE 

What It Coifts to be ALWAYS READY 

Electric energy cannot be stored in large quan- 
tities. It cannot be stored economically at all. It 
must he used the instant it is produced, or it is 
gone. 

The plant must have generating power enough 
lei all the requirements of its custi irs, any in- 
stant that any of them or all of them together 
may happen to turn on the current. 

These short winter days, when early darkness 
overtakes business hours, a doubly groat demand 
is made on an electric plant. It is only for a short 
time. But the equipment at the works and the 
distributing system of heavy copper wire must be 
able to supply that demand. 

For ait electrical enterprise to lie even- read) Eor 
short spurts of big service requires an extra large 
money investment. 

But if electrical demands were uniform, hour in 
and hour out, day in and day out. the equipment 
could he easily figured on thai average liasis. Then 
a much smaller investment would he sufficient, 
And the price of electric lights and of electric en- 
ergy could be made very much less. 

San Francisco Gas and Eledric Company 

AT YOUR SERVICE DAY AND NIGHT 
445 Sutter Street Telephone Sutter 140 




Ladies 
Tailor 



II is with great pleasure that we announce the opening of our down town establishment 
at 418 SUTTER STREET between Powell and Stockton, with the newest materials of im- 
ported and domestic patterns of high quality. We have always succeeded in pleasing our 
customers and are now better prepared than ever before to give perfect satisfaction. We 
have the latest approved st>les from the leading fashion centers of (he world, and our gar- 
ments are guaranteed to fit perfectly. 

Fair Prices, Best of Work, Fine Materials, Correct Styles. Perfect Fit, All that's Latest. 
All (hat's Good. Your trial order is respectfully solicited and we invite you to call whether 
you arc ready to place your order or not. Very respectfully yours. 



Oscar Vogel 



.1 AM'AliY 29, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



15 



W& Mmi/ter qf-limfaM&bW 



Secretary Knox. 

niPLOMATIST. 



Russia and Japan have officially re- 
jected Secretary Knox's plan to 
neutralize the railways of Manchuria 



be j i instructed under the direction and financial patronage of the 
leading nations. Russia's reply cannot be said to be couched in 
courteous language, but since the suggestion seemed so prepos- 
terous to the Russian State and financial departments, perhaps 
they do not deem anything other than btuntness the proper way 
to express their dissatisfaction. It must be that they have been 
made suspicions of the United States, else the Foreign Minister, 
M. Iswolsky, would hardly have told our ambassador to Russia 
that if persisted in the policy of Secretary Knox would drive 
Russia to arms with Japan, especially the position of the United 
States concerning the administration of the Harbin district, 
which is under Russian laws and Russian officials, and which 
arrangement the United States docs not take kindly to. There is 
no mistaking Russia's hostility to this country. But perhaps it 
clearly misunderstands Knox's rather mysterious diplomacy. At 
all events, the Russian Government interprets the great and 
uninvited interest our State Department is taking in the affairs 
of Manchuria to mean an ulterior purpose to play into the hands 
of Japan as against Russia, and into the hands of China, that 
she may ultimately regain her jurisdiction over the whole of 
Manchuria, with the privilege of purchasing all the railways of 
Russia and Japan in that province. In other words, Russia is 
suspicious that the United States is trying to play Russia agairisl 
Japan in the interest of China. We of the United Stales, how- 
ever, reject the suspicion as unwarranted. What Knox is playing 
for is the open door policy in both China and Manchuria, hut thus 
far the play has been lamentably weak and bluffy. Japan's reply 

to Secretary Kno\ is 'e courteous and Btrictly diplomatic. The 

Mikado can see nothing in the nculraliz.it ion of the Manchurian 
railways that would benefit his nation in any particular, and it 
might seriously retard Japan's scheme to colonize the province 
and ultimately absorb it al the request of bis Manchuriar sub- 
jects by a "popular vote." There is nothing lacking in Ja] 
diplomacy, cunning or statesmanship. Thus far. since the Ports- 
mouth convention, thej promised much to the United Sta 

various occasions, and thus far they have failed to even 
a reciprocal sentiment, to say nothing aboul theil eiinn 

sowing the seed of suspicion of i he United States in i he n 
Russia. 



Like as in the Orient, Secretary 

K\o\ IN NlCARAQl \. KnOX has blustered to no pnrp 

Nicaragua. President frfadriz, who 
superceded Zelaya in the Presidential chair, practically at the 
command of the United sintes. which was an unwarranted in- 
trusion iii the domestic concerns of a sister Republic. i« in the 
midst of a revolution of greater magnitude and earnestness 
ever Paced a elayan administration. Had Knox been at all 
acquainted with affairs in Nicaragua, he would have known 
Qea .al Estrada was al the bead of a revolutitmarj army to un- 
seat Zalayfl and - ■'.' as the head of tlie Government, and 
thai Maori listasteful to his ambition as was 
The consequence ^. Nicaragua, Judge 

. is facing revolutions upon every hand, and it 
as if lie would, have to flee the country unless S Knox 

marines to tight his battles for bin 
Iral American political leaders are alike, and bad as . 
have been, he is just as ^<><A a man and as much of a pair 

Madriz'or a£ il Estrada. Had Kni 

blunder by persuading ad an arm 

take possession of the country ;. 

American in would have accomplished s 

while, but as matters now stand, the present stab i i 
igus are rather worse than at ai time, and ' 

cans a t tie or no 

md of dipl - little in 

than bin IT. bluster and prep 

eir own affairs. 



Both England and Prance have re- 

pF GENERAL INTEREST. considered their approval of the 

Knox Manchurian railway scheme. 

and will stand with Russia and Japan in opposition to it. They 

have so notified our State Department. 

What China is watching the United States for does not ap- 
pear, but her newspapers are keeping tab on all important Wash- 
ington doings and sayings. 

The Irish contingent in the British Parliament is to have its 
day. It will hold the balance of power in the new Commons. 

The mental breaking down of Mr. Balfour is a calamity to 
Great Britain, but there is reason to hope that he will soon be 
himself again. 

American heiresses should look out for the ''Duke of Morney." 
He is pronounced a fraud. 

England's shipbuilding record for 1909 is 1088 new vessels, in- 
cluding warships, but of course a very large per ceni of them 
are commerce carriers. 

Japan's latest note to the United States on the question of, 
neutralizing the Manchurian railroads is to the effect that Japan- 
ese capital on a larger scale than ever will undertake to gridiron 
that country in the interest of Japanese commerce. 

The secret is out concerning the recall of Mr. Crane, who did 
not go to China as American ambassador. Japan ascertained 
that Mr. Crane was interested in several business enterprises in 
Russia, and the Mikado promptly notified Mr. Knox that he 
would prefer that Mr. Crane did not go to China. Evidently his 
royal highness has a "pull" in Washington. 

Already the new queen of Belgium is the most popular woman 
in the kingdom. She is democratic to the backbone, while the 
king seems to be just one of the people without the usual nour- 
ishes of stuck-up royalty. 

Spain is forgetting her recent political troubles and the peo- 
ple generally are working to increase the importance of their 
country as a commercial nation. 

There is not the slightest indication of war anywhere in 
Europe other than that which is seen in the general ru 
lighting ships and better-equipped armies. 

The Republic of Mexico is snowing - 
furnished Zelaya a gunboat to escape from the wrath of the 
Knit id Si 

Pagan Sum sending money to Christian England to f 1 that 

country's pi jerious thought. 

India has not. been so quiet nor the pi II satisfied with 

Brit tab rule hi lull g century, 

A stream of immigration from Ilin in for Can- 

ada, where the new-comer-; will engage in agriculture. 



REDUCE THE CARES 
of housekeeping. One decidedly practical way Is to use Borden's Peer- 
less Brand Evaporated Milk In all cooking where milk or cream la re- 
quired. Results will be more satisfactory than with most "fresh" milk 
The convenience and economy will please you. Dilute Peerless Milk with 
water to any desired richness. 



Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh 's, who is now permanently located at Post and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




CURTAZ 
PIANO 



1910 Style 



lotoaparabfj feeftn- thai, any <Hh*r ia its c 
A little Lower Priced Than the Other* 

Benj. Curtaz & Son 

118-117 Kearny Street near Post 




R. Bujannoff 

MANUFACTURING JEWELER 

AND 

DIAMOND SETTER 

51 LIC* PL ACS. WfSM». 



1G 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 89, 1910. 



By Majob Bun C. Truman. 



The most notable and most remarkable eradication of undesir- 
able nuisances engendered by the,great catastrophe in San Fran- 
cisco in 1!>06 has been the absolute elimination of the genu- 
"hoodlum." As a matter of fact and record, the San Francisco 
hoodlum had been quietly and almost unobservedly passing a\va\ 
for the two decades ending with the close of the nineteenth cen- 
tury. He was at his zenith in the late sixties: was more or less 
troublesome always, and gave the police much nunc fear and an- 
guish than many more hardened and more dangerous characters. 

Once in a while, since and before the complete passing away 
forever of this unspeakable combination of body, mind and -nil. 
other than San Francisco papers have written of their rowdies 
and loafers as hoodlums. Always it was a mistaken use of the 
term. There never strictly was a San Francisco hoodlum in any 
other city in the world — not in London or Paris: not in Chicago 
or New York; not in San Jose or Sacramento. All of these 
cities, and all others of pretentious population, are burdened with 
bullies and toughs, burglars and highwaymen, loafers and marau- 
ders, and many other mischief-makers and nuisances — but no 
hoodlums. 

The San Francisco hoodlum seemed generally to have main- 
tained a better and closer acquaintance with soap and water 
than the average undesirable of other municipalities. He was 
never, or seldom ever, a vagrant, and almost always lived at home. 
where he had parents and brothers and sisters. If he did not in- 
variably sleep at home, he could be easily found in some neigh- 
boring lumber-yard or brick-kiln. He always dressed in dark 
or dark brown clothes, and hi= pantaloons had what looked like 
metal spring bottoms, such as encased no other human legs or 
were anywhere else ever seen : and his hat had a round, stiff top — 
not strictly unlike that of a Derby, and yet not like that — and 
an even rounder and stiffer brim, just like no other hat brim ever 
seen in the world. 

Unlike nearly all other undesirables, the San Francisco hood- 
lum never wore a strictly vicious or strictly amiable look; but 
there never was a hoodlum wdio did not have a sulky face — no one 
could mistake him; his clean, sulky face; his uncriminal ap- 
pearance (except to the police), and his inimitable head-piece 
and spring-bottom mints, would always accurately give him awa\ 
at the drop of a handkerchief. His bat and clothes were never 
made to order, of course. Nor purchased in the same store: yet 
they looked as if they bad all been manufactured in the same 
establishment by the same person. In January, 1867, having 
been in San Francisco but. a few weeks. 1 was sitting one day in 
a window with Genera] Hiram Leonard, then at the head of the 
army pay corps of the Pacific Coast, and as three becomingly- 
dressed young fellows passed, the Genera] asked; "Hid you see 
those three men," and 1 answered in the affirmative. And he 
proceeded: "Well, those are hoodlums." 1 have Been thousands 
since, and they all have reminded me of those three. 

I should hardly dare say thai th i old-time h Hum never got 

drunk. But I never saw one stagger along a street or who 
seemed to be under the influence of liquor. I should have guessed 
that he partook sparingly of beer at a social drink, aud not even 
moderately of whiskey. But, of course, 1 never saw a hoodlum 
in the kind of drinking places 1 occasionally visited. He never 
frequented any of the higher class of free-lunch establishments 
that existed on Bush, Pine, Montgomery and Washington streets 
forty years ago, nor did he ever hang around cigar stores along 
those thoroughfares. He could occasionally be seen with bis 
parents, or with some girl of about his own age. in the famih i ir- 
cle of Maguire's Opera House, especially when •'Pichard" or 
"Macbeth," "Hamlet" or "Othello." were on the boards. I he 
hoodlum was never a Barharv Coaster, nor a Dupont street vam- 
pire. He generally lived with his parents, or with other rela- 
tives, south of Market street, and had seldom if ever reached the 
age of twenty. 

Once, in i869, General W. II . L. Barnes, Tom Madden and 
I went out an afternoon and evening to study the hoodlum. We 
sat at the same table at the old Occidental for three years, and 
often discussed this curious creature. We .secured a closed car- 



riage and a driver wdio was supposed to know the ropes, and we 
directed him to take u> to "Hoodlum town." "I don't know any 
such place," he replied. "I can take you to Chinatown, or the 
Barbary Coast; but I don't know any such place as Hoodlum- 
town." "But you know where the hoodlums bang out, don't 
you?" interrogated the General. "We want to sec their ways 
around where they live and where they drink and play cards." 
Well, we were driven up and down Mission. Howard and Polsom 
streets, before and after dark, and set up the drinks and cigars 
in a number of saloons and corner grocery stores, and saw lots 
of young fellows with the regulation lid and spring-bottom pants, 
sulky and well-scrubbed faces, bul otherwise appearing like a lot 
of seventeen-year-old Sunday school youth bent on no malicious 
mischief whatever. It was only once in a while that we came 
across any of these character- m the saloons, and never did one 
of these step up to the bar with (be crowd and take a drink. 
even of beer, and generally they refused cigars. At the corner 
groceries it was about the same, so far as we were concerned; 
but we once in a while saw a quartette of them playing euchre or 
cinch for cigars or beer or small stake of money. Many a time 
afterward,. Genera] Barnes referred to that trip, ami once said: 
"That was the strangest expedition I ever made, and 1 came 
near saying the most unsatisfactory. But it. was quite the re- 
verse; it was quite satisfactory. 1 had expected to come across 
a lot of dirty, beer-drinking, boisterous, dangerous young ras- 
cals that would be dying to knock my head off if 1 gave them half 
a chance. Instead, they were better behaved than half the youth 
I have many times seen in a college town. The thing that I par- 
ticularly noticed was the similarity of their apparel, their clean. 
shining faces, their small hands and feet, their nearness of age 
and weight." 



ar 



3C 



3DC 



3C 




RIPE, RICH, MELLOW 



UNIQUE IN PURITY, OF HIGHEST STANDARD 
IN QUALITY, GUARANTEED BY ITS PROPRIE- 
TORS UNDER THE NATIONAL PURE FOOD 
LAW AN ABSOLUTELY PURE RYE WHISKEY 



HUNTER 

BALTIMORE 

RYE 



Sold at all first-class cafes and by Jobbi rs. 
Wm. Lanahan & Son, Baltimore. Md. 



JC 



DDE 



DC 



JL 



Jam ary '.'9. 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



17 



I was once, in 1868, conversing with Patrick Crowley, the then 
S;m Francisco Chief of Police, on this subject, and he said: "So 
far as my observation and information goes, 1 am quite positive 
that there is no other wayward character altogether similar to 
our hoodlum. I sometimes think he has simply 'growed' like 
Topsy. There is hardly a dozen hoodlums in San Francisco that 
have not. come from respectable parentage — poor working people, 
generally, but respectable. And 1 note thai they are nearly all 
Americans, Irish or Australians — never French, Germans, Mexi- 
cans, nor English. Sometimes either one or the other, or both, 
of their parents arc addicted to drink, and sometimes they are 
criminals. But in a majority of cases their parents are hard- 
working, sober people, and have savings in the Hibernia bank. A 
curious, and, I may add incongruous, feature is that every hood- 
lum has a girl — I mean a good girl — who is either unaware of 
his evil life, or, aware of his misdeeds, hopes to correct them. It 
is no infrequent thing to see a hoodlum and his respectable sweet- 
heart at church, at the circus, or at Maguire's. But he is as sly 
as a fox and as quick as a ferret, and his parents are always ready 
with alibis. It is extremely difficult to catch him, and still more 
difficult to convict him. He is not often inclined to do atrocious 
things, and seldom carries a murderous weapon. And yet, he is a 
terror and the constant dread of the police, and seldom ever 
marauds alone. Hoodlumism is generally carried on by twos, 
sometimes by three, and once in a while by fours. It mainly 
exists south of Market street, and is operated from the water 
front to the Mission. The principal commissions are petty house- 
breaking, stealing from small stores and warehouses, rolling 
drunken men, ami scaring shop and servant girls returning to 
their homes singly after dark out of small coin. Its riddance is 
problematical; but presumably not impossible. Indeed, I am of 
the opinion that we shall some time be able to wipe it out." 

In 1891 Colonel Grannis attempted an explanation of the 
word hoodlum in a San Francisco newspaper, and claimed that it 
originated in 1871, and that it was first applied to the leader 
(named Hood) of a gang of bad young men under twenty years 
of age by a San Francisco justice of the peace. So far as the time 
was concerned, the- generally well-informed Grannis was wrong, 
as I often heard the term six or seven years before 187 I. [ndeed, 
in a speech in Piatt's Hall, in 1864, Nathan Porter declared that 
the word hoodlum came from tin' word "huddle," and thai a gang 
of bad boys who committed misdeeds at the Eool el' Washington 
street and ou Telegraph Hill were called "lnuldlers" by the police 
as early as'1859. Irving M. Sent!, in 1898, in a discussion of the 
word, said that the term was derived from the words "huddle" 
and "Hood;" that a youne. man of nineteen named II I was the 

leader of a gang of twentj '"Id younger petty depredators, "ho 

I'm' a long time huddled together in eld boilers "'a; 
Washington slreet as early as L858, and that lli.y al tirsl called 

themselves huddlers, ami. later, hoodlums. Captain k.bner Bar- 
ker, who came to San Francisco ie 1850, and who owned property 

on Washington street, once .-aid to me that hi I'd the 

word hoodlum applied to young miscreants al the Mission in the 
early sixties. However this mav all he. the San Prancisco hood- 
lum is gont — gone wilii the catastrophe of 1906, never again to 
appear. 

To be sure, there will be many had and many kinds 

of bad characters in a great and growing city Like San Fi u 

However vigilant and numerous its police, however rigid and 
determined its courts, the metropolis will always have its t 

miscreants and marauders. Despite all surveillance and safe- 
guards, 'lie highwayman will every once in a while hold up his 

victim al the point of a murderous gun; the burglar »: 
tinue his methods of entering other people's premises and purloin- 
ing all valuables within his reach ; and a whole lo 
drels will make miserable the lives of man\ goo, I , ti ens during 
any month's calendar. Bui the real old-time gi lum is 

no longer a subject of the rogw 's gallery ot San Pi 
further factor in the annals of crime. Froi he was 

becomi er each year- parti . 

home conditions and more rigid sectarian Sunday teaching 
partly to the aspiration of mechs 

surveillance and increased judicial seventies. And then cam,' 
the awful visitation of 1906, and he was wiped off the earth for- 
ever. 

Apropos, 1 had a long conversation with an old-time resident 
of the Mission a ired me that 0) 

bad the hoodlum been exterminated from Town- 

Bead street, the Mission and Rincon Hill, but that there 



such assemblages of cats and curs and parrots as before. His 
words were about as follows: "This residential part of the city, 
which suffered more than the Western Addition, was the par-" 
ticular breeding area of these four nuisances; while the north 
side of Market, west of Polk, had no hoodlums, not many parrots, 
and only a few curs and eats, proportionately. There were either 
cats or curs on both to every three families between Second and 
Twenty-third streets, and between Mission and Townsend ; and 
along portions of Mission and Howard and Folsom and Valencia 
streets there were parents that could sing and whistle, shout and 
scream and laugh and swear in every block — these latter denizens 
betraying positive ornithological evidence of a motley population 
of acrimonious spinsters, beer-consuming old lodging house keep- 
ers, and a large number of widows with no husbands under the 
sod; and statistics would have shown, undoubtedly, that the 
rushing of the growler took place more frequently in a single 
night than in the Western Addition in a month. Why. in the 
days before the fire, it was nip and tuck between the hoodlums 
and the parrots as to which were the more profane, and between 
the cats and the curs as to which would make night more hideous 
with their meaows and howls." Which prompts me lo conclude 
as follows: 

"No more are heard the wails of cats and dogs, 

Nor even the parrot's profanity; 
While the hateful hoodlum lias been wiped out — 

Which is a big thing for humanity." 




LEA&PERRINS 



SAUCE 

THE OniOINAL WORCESTERSHIRE 

Soups, Fish, Steaks, Roasts, 
Chops and many other 
dishes are improved by its use. 

Shun Substitutes. 

John Duncan*! Sons, Ago., N. Y. 



PIANOS 

From S250 to fi.OOO. We carry the bes"t makes on the 

market. 

Any of our Pianos will be taken in exchange for a Steinway 
anytime within three years, and full purchase price allowed. 

Any Piano, including- Stein ways, on moderate monthly pay. 

menls. 

Sherman Ray & Go. 



Sln»l! fi Other rNuos. 



PUrer Pmbos of Al Grades 



KEARNY AND SITTER STREETS. SAN FRANCISCO 
FOURTEENTH AND CLAY STREETS. OAKLAND 



18 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29. 1910. 




What About the 
Sutuo Estate? 



It is twelve years since Adolph 
Sutrn died; anil ii seems that the 
public should be given some intima- 
tion as to what lias been done, or is 
to be done, regarding the carrying out of the dead millionaire's 
wishes as to the disposition of his estate, particularly of his gre H 
library ami the real estate in the neighborhood of the Cliff 
IbuiM.'. 

For -years it was the admitted desire of Sutro that the Cliff 
House property and the San Miguel ranch to the south el' it 
should be held in trust, and the proceeds devoted to (lie public 
good, in such directions as charities, beneficial ami educational 
institutions and the like. These lands, containing fully 1,200 
acres, are "1 greal value, and are located in a spol where, as 
public parks alone, they would be a boon to the public whom 
Sutro avowedly wished to benefit. 

While the total estate of Adolph Sutro was of an estimated 
value of three million dollars, its present market value is not 
accurately known, in all probability, bin the part of it in which 
the greatest interest is taken by San Franciscans is the library. 
This library was Sutro's especial hobby, lie spent over a quarl t 
ot a million dollars in assembling the 300,000 volumes n con- 
tained at the time of his death. Among these were many ex- 
tremely rare works ami manuscripts. It was one of the finest 
libraries in the world. 

During the long years of litigation following Sutro's death, 
this library has lain buried from view. Half of it was kept 
stored in the Montgomery Block; the other half in a house on 
Battery street. The latter place was burned in 1906, and the 
books with it. but the half in the Montgomery Block was saved. 

What is to be done with this? Is it to be kept perpetually bur- 
ied, in defiance of Sutro's oft-expressed wish that it be turned 
over to the public ? Shall this great literary storehouse be lost 
to those who would appreciate it? 

The six heirs of Adolph Sutro are Mrs. Dr. Emma Merritt, 
who was made executrix of the will which was signed in 18S2 ; 
Mrs. Clara English, Mrs. K. Nussbaum, Mrs. Kose Morhlo, Ed- 
gar ami Charles Sutro. By a decision of the Supreme Court, 
handed down July 28, 1909, the trust clause in the will was held 
to be invalid, and thus was made possible a distribution of the 
estate among these heirs. 

But what about the acres near the ocean beach and what about 
i1h- magnificent library? Are the wishes ot Adolph Sutro in 
relation to these to be carried out? 



Tlie Merchant Marine League is now 
The Merchant actively engaged in the campaign 

Marine Leagcte. that should have been entered upon 

long ago by those whose ilesire it is 
to foster American shipping; namely, ii is showing the advan- 
tages of organized, concerted effort toward educating lie people 
at large, especially those of the interior, regarding the present 
status of the remnant of the American merchant marine, ami 
the ways and means for restoring our iln u to its former high 
place upon the ocean. 

The establishment ol new branches in inland cities ami towns 
is going mi apace, a notable step being the recent organization of 

a branch in Redw 1 City. This is the right sort of work. All 

the people need is to be told whal is wanted, having Brsl been 
impressed with the deplorable state of decadence into which the 
A rican merchant marine has fallen. 

'the merchant marine, indeed, is now passing through the 
same experiences that the navy passed through immediately after 
the Civil War, when our navy was inferior to that of a third- 
class power, and at once the laughing stork of foreigners and the 
mortification of patriotic Americans. It took just the kind of 
campaign of education to rehabilitate tin navy that has now, 
happily, been undertaken in behalf of the merchant marine. It 
took years to awaken the people to an appreciation of the needs 
ol' the navy, but when they were once awakened, they responded 
liberally, with the result that we now have a Davy of which we 



may be proud. The same thing should take place in regard to 
the merchant marine, which, indeed, by reason of its direct bear- 
ing upon the commerce and financial resources of the country. 
is in more direct contact with the people at large than the navy 
Hi' was. 'fbr people away from the seaboard are at last reali''.- 
ing that the restoration of the merchant marine is a matter of 
as immediate concern to them as to the people of the seaports and 
the coasts. Missionary work is needed, missionary work is now 
in progress, and it should be the duty of every citizen to join in 
the campaign, and to convince his friends that it is also their duty 
to join in the general movement for the encouragement of Ameri- 
can shipping. 



As I pointed out last week, the city will probably have to 

purchase the distributing plant of the Spring Valley Water Com- 
pany sooner or later, despite the adverse vote at the recent water 
bona election. The only alternative is to create an entirely new 
distributing plant, at immense expense of both money and time, 
putting the operation of a municipal water system oil' until tic 
next generation. Communities, like individuals, often act im- 
pulsively, upon the evidence of insufficient data, or upon down- 
right misinformation. It is not probable that there will be much 
further depreciation of Spring Valley securities for some years to 
come. 



The new Bank of Commerce, on Fillmore street, where it 

occupies the old post-earthquake quarters of the Swiss-American 
Bank, is said to be a great convenience to the merchants and 
property-holders of tin- Western Addition. The bank has already 

secured a site for its permanent quarters, and will soon have its 
own building. 



Opinions differ as to the alacrity with which the new city 

bonds, voted at the last election, will be taken up, but there is a 
widespread belief that Eastern capital will not be over-eager I" 
invest in them. Such, at least, is the outlook at the time of 
present writing. 



E. F. HUTTON & CO. 

490 California Street 

Telephone Douglas 2487 

and ST. FRANCIS HOTEL 

Telephone Douglas 3982 

Members New York Stock Exchange. Pioneer House. 
Private wire to Chicago and New York. 

R. E. MULCAHY, Manager. 



Private Wire Chicago — New York. 

J. C. WILSON 

f New York Stock Exchange 
Member < Chicago Board of Trade 

(. Stock and Bond Exchange, S. F. 
Local and Eastern Stocks and Bonds 



Main Office 

Mills Bide. 

Tel. Kearny 482 



Branch Office 
Hotel Alexandria 
Los Anffelea 



Branch Office: Palace Hotel 



JANUARY INVESTMENTS 

6 per cent 1910 send for 



Before converting your S. P. of ARIZ, 
our list of 

BOND OFFERINGS 



412 Montgomery Street 



SUTRO & CO., 



San Francisco 



FRANK P. MEDINA, ATTORNEY AT LAW 

of Medina and Griffin. Dissolved, remains at the old address, 812-814 
Clau« Spreckela Bldgr. Patents, Trade Marks, Copyrights. Patent Liti- 
gation. MANY YEARS EXPERIENCE WITH PATENT OFFICE EXAMINERS. 



.1 \\i u;\ 20, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



19 



If you have but. one telephonic system, I here is no danger, 

when you are busy with the line, of being interrupted by a call 
IM 'i ii some one other than the party with whom you are talking. 
If you have the dual system, both hells may ring al on, v. and 
you do not know which to answer first, or, if you are al one, the 
other may ring -while you arc talking, and being unable to an- 
swer both at the same time, the one unanswered will report you 
not at home. Conversely, when you desire to call up another 
party who has telephones of two systems, you are apl to be in 
doubt as to which to use; the same experience may be had as al- 
ready described, with the parties reversed. The closer you look 
at it, the clumsier the dual system appears. The annoyances of 
the dual system multiply in practice. The benefits are undis- 
eoveialilc. For years, San Francisco has had an excellent single 
system, which has been steadily bettered until it is now close to 
perfection. Why bring confusion and extra expense by introduc- 
ing the bothersome dual system ? 



1 The undefined rumors concerning Associated Oil grow 

more numerous. The general belief that there is "something do- 
ing" in this stock becomes more deeply settled each day. The 
fact that the Southern Pacific Railroad controls this company is 
well known, and the report is being circulated, but not confirmed, 
I hat the railroad is preparing to increase its holding to 75 per 
cent of the capital stock, when it may merge the Associated Oil 
with its other properties. It is said that this merger is con- 
templated, and that its accomplishment will be followed by the 
placing of the stock upon a 6 per cent dividend basis. 



The people of this country have come to a sorry state of 

things when they have to abstain from needed food to force the 
trusts to quit robbing them. Surely the day of reckoning is do1 
far off. With the greatest supply of food and food products that 
the United Stales was ever blessed with, these advances in prices 
are not only fiendish, but inhuman to barbarism. 



Few heavy demands having been made upon the financial 

institutions of the city within the past few days, the money mar- 
ket is somewhat easier, but there is no immediate proapei I of 
cheap money in the immediate future. The rate remains high, 
although it has been higher. Dullness in the building trades has 
marked the week. 



Profit taking caused a slight drop in oil stocks, bul a 

perfectly normal one. early in the week. Oil Btocks as a whole 

remain substantially on the same footing as they did lasl week. 

and the demand for them is rightly maintained by wise investors. 



San Francisco, "the pleasure-loving community," lias as 

line billiard halls as any city in the country. Norn 
Noi even in New fork or Chicago air to be Foun I bill ard halls 
as line, for instance, as Qraney's, on Market street, above Powell, 
ami Wright's, on Ellis street, below Powell, opposite the flood 
building. Sumptuously fitted up in every particular, these two 
attractive halls have the best of billiard tables, notablj ri 
pattern of Brunswick-Balie-Collender table. These table 
recently been received, and arc daily and nightly delighting 
patrons of the places named, who are so nun i-rally. 

I ha I they have to await their turns at the BrUHSwii 
lender table-. 



In keeping with its characteristic - i please its 

patrons, the Techau Tavern has arranged for a resumption 

vocal concerts which, were such an attractive feature of it in the 

tore the fire of 1906. The man 
has procured an operatic attraction which, it is believed, will 
eclipse all previous undertakings of the kind. The singers will 
be accompanied by an orchestra . and the concerts will 

be given daily at luncheon and dinner time, during the shopping 
hours and after the theatre. 



"Xow. children." said the A' I the 

farmer has made all the butler and cheese he needs and uses 
what milk he wants for his family, what does hi' do with the 
milk that still remains?" Dead silence followed for a moment, 
and then one little hand waved frantically. T 
and said. "Well, Tommy r™ "1' 
piped Tommy Thimbleful. 



A NEW HOME Fun GOURMETS. 

Another splendid restaurant is about to In? opened in San 
Francisco, one that will undoubtedly add to the city's already 
world-wide reputation as a resort for epicures. 

It will be conducted by Jules Wittman, the "Jules" so well 
known to bon vivants not only in San Francisco, but throughout 
the country, and even abroad; 

It will be recalled that "Jules" was the first of the old restau- 
rateurs to move back down town after the fire, into the old burned 
business district. He is now to move into what will be one of 
the finest restaurants in the United States. It will be located in 
the capacious basement of the Monadnoek building on Market 
street below Third. 

The total floor space, exclusive of kitchen and store-rooms, 
will embrace about 10,000 square feet. The restaurant will be 
provided with hardwood, marble and ornamental glass in profu- 
sion, with antique lighting fixtures and artistic mural decora- 
tions. There will be a Norman room, a mahogany room and other 
special retreats for parties. 

Best, of all, the fact that "Jules" will he in charge insures the 
gratification of the most exacting gourmets. 



The Star Hair Remedy, the best tonic; restores color to 

gray hair; stops falling; cures dandruff; grows new hair. All 
druggists. 



Shop Before 12 at 

D. Samuels 



Every department at D. 
Samuels will offer strong 
specials every morning. 

Not some departments some 
mornings, but every depart- 
ment every morning. 

This store must be busy the 
entire day. 



D. SAMUELS 

The Lace House 



A. W. Beft 



Best's Art School 



1628 Bush Street 



Life Cla 

Dey and Night 



lUustrating 

Sketching 
Painting 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 



Fire Marine Automobile 

Fireman's Fund Insurance Company 



Capital, $1,500,000 



Assets, $7,000,000 



California and Sansome Streets, 
San Francisco, California. 



Cash Capital, $400,000. Cash Assets, $900,000 

Pacific Coast Casualty Company 

OF CALIFORNIA. 

Employers' Liability. General Liability, Teams, Elevators, Workmen's 
Collective, Vessels, Automobiles, Burglary, Plate Glass, Personal Acci- 
dents Insurance, Fidelity and Surety Bonds. 

Officers — Edmund F. Green, President; John C. Coleman, Vice-Presi- 
dent; F. A. Zane, Secretary; Ant. Borel & Co., Treasurers; F. P. Deerlng, 
Counsel. 

Directors — A. Borel, H. E. Bothin, Edward L. Brayton, John C. Cole- 
man. F. P. Deering, E. F. Green, James K. Moffitt, J. W. Phillips, 
Henry Rosenfeld, Adolph A. Son, William S. Tevls. 

Head Office — Merchants' Exchange Building, San Francisco. Marshal 
A. Frank Company, General Agents for California, 422 Montgomery St., 
San Francisco. 

The Connecticut Fire Insurance Company 

Of Hartford. Established 1850. - 

Cash Capital $1,000,000 

Cash Assets 6,956,215 

Surplus to Policyholders ." 2,790,360 

ALASKA COMMERCIAL BUILDING, 
BENJAMIN J. SMITH, Manager. 

British and Foreign Marine Insurance Co. Ltd. 



OF LIVERPOOL. 



Capital 



000 



$6,700, 

BALFOUR, GUTHRIE & CO., Agents. 
350 California Street San Francisco. 

The Weft Coaft Life Insurance Co. 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



A strong, well managed Institution; organized under the rigid insurance 
laws of California. Its policy forms are clear and explicit and define and 
guard the interests of polTcy-holders as do those of no other company. 
Ask any agent, or write the company for sample of policy forms. 



Roy C. Ward 



James K. Polk 



Jas. W. Dean 



Geo. E. Billings 



Geo. E. Billings Gompany 



ALL FORMS OF INSURANCE EFFECTED. 
312 California St., San Francisco, Cal. Phone Douglas 2283 




Sign of the 
Pacific Mutual of California 



"Men of California" keep the 
premiums paid for your Acci- 
dent Insurance "in Cali- 
fornia" where the investment 
will add to your prosperity. 

The best Accident and Dis- 
ability Contracts ever issued 
in the world are being writ- 
ten by the 

Pacific Mutual of California 

Agency of F. A. STEARNS 

Manager Accident Department, 

501-502 Shreve Building 

Phone Douglas 240 San Francisco 




IN9VMCE 




Clarence M. Smith, senior member of the firm of Smith, 
Thomas & Thomas, California general agents of the Northwest- 
em Mnliial Life Insurance Company, is one of the few success- 
ful life insurance solicitors who have this peculiar ability joined 
to a good business head. Although to-day well along in years, 
In- personal production of new business annually sets a good 
example to his able corps of agents. Through his shrewdness in 
business affairs, Mr. Smith is now reckoned among the solid 
financiers of San Francisco, and this position has been gained 
with no sacrifice of a disposition always genial and lovable. He 
lias represented the Northwestern in California since 18SU. 

* * * 

The committee from the Los Angeles Board appointed to in- 
terview coast managers in San Francisco for the purpose of se- 
curing a twenty per cent Hal commission, abolition of dual 
agencies and the privilege to patronize brokers, is meeting with 
little encouragement, as the result of their visit, and appear lit- 
tle enthused themselves regarding the success of their mission. 
On the first proposition they have been turned down Hat by every 
office; the second has been but weakly encouraged by a few, and 
the third has be?n pointed out to them as being suicidal for the 

local agent. 

* * * 

There is a persistent rumor having a substantial basis which 
we are at present not permitted to disclose, that the Home of 
New York will shortly make application for lull membership 
in the Board of Fire Underwriters of the Pacific. 

* * * 

At the semi-annual meeting of the Oakland Board of Fire 
Underwriters, held January 20th, the following officers were 
elected: T. P. Emigh, Jr., president; Jerry Tyrrell, vice-presi- 
dent; C. Fred Burks, secretary; E. If. McCandlish, treasurer. 
Executive committee — I. H. Clay, F. J. Taylor, F. VV. Le Bal- 
lister (retiring president), F. F. Porter and H. \Y. Ellis. The 
meeting was of unusual interest, and among other important 
things discussed were the abolition of wildcat companies and 
plans for the members to attend the State Convention in Los 
Angeles next May. 

* * * 

So much success has been met in the organization of the new 
Pacific States Fire Insurance Company, of Portland, Oregon, 
that the projectors are now of the opinion that a million dollars 
can be placed in the course of time. The plan of the company- 
is being received favorably by the business men, and they are 
subscribing more readily than was anticipated. There will be 
no stock issued that is not fully paid for, together with a sub- 
stantial reserve, and no one is making anything on the sale of the 
stock. It is understood that the company has practically closed 
with Charles A. Craft. :is underwriting manager. Mr. Craft 
is one of the brightest and ablest insurance men on the coast, 
and thoroughly understands the business in all its branches. He 
is at presenl in charge of the Johnson & Higgins office in Seattle, 
Washington. 

* * * 

Extensive preparations are being made for the annual meeting 
and banquet id' the Life Underwriters' Association of San Fran- 
cisco, which takes place at (he St. Francis Hotel on Saturday 
evening. January 29th. President John W. Wliiltingtou, of the 
national body, will be the guest of honor, and the dinner will 
lie followed by an executive session at which the year's work will 
he reviewed ami a number of new members elected. Officers lor 
the coming year will also be elected. W. EL Hathaway, of the 
Mutual Life, appears to be the unanimous choice for president. 
■ * * * 

The annual report of the Fire Underwriters 1 Inspection Bureau 
for the year 1909 says that while :i large proportion of the lime 
of the inspection force has been taken up by the inspection of 
buildings in course of construction, ii being necessary to take 
advantage of the existing opportunity for this important work, 
the proportion of such work in San Francisco is now decreasing 



JANCABY 29, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



21 



rapidly, as is shown bj a falling off of 35 per cent during 1909. 
The publication of Standard Reports (replacing the former 
special hazard Burveys), is Hearing completion. These reports 
have been highly commended, and arc believed to be up to recog- 
nized standards. The bureau has still in hand"in San Francisco 
188 buildings in course of construction (to which 1982 risits 
have already been made), a decrease of 4"v per cent from the num- 
ber carried forward from 1!)0S. 

* * * 

George C. Pratt, treasurer of the New Amsterdam Casualty 
of New York, Bpent twenty-three of the curlier years of his life 
in California, and at one time had charge of the agencies of the 
California Company throughout the United States. Later he 
took- the Coast general agency of the Provident Savings Life, 
leaving that company to form a credit insurance company, the 
subscribers to which subsequently pooled their interests with 
the New Amsterdam. 

* * # 

A map showing the "fireproof" ((instruction to March, 1909. 
has also keen issued, and will soon be corrected up to date. The 
manager says that he attended the annual meeting of the 
Mat ii mal Fire Protection Association, in May, at Chicago, and 
visited all members of the Inspection Bureau in the East, and 
finds that periodical meetings with members located away from 
San Francisco are essential to the welfare of the Bureau. The 
San Francisco force now includes, in addition to the manager, 
nine inspectors, a stenographer, and five clerks. Besides San 
Francisco, the Bureau now has jurisdiction over the following 
departments: Oakland, Berkeley and Alameda; Salt Lake City 
and Ogden ; Tacoma and Spokane; Portland: Los Angeles; 
Seattle. 

* * * 

President Henry Evans, of the Fidelity, writes that the merger 
of his company with the Phenix of Brooklyn, will be completed 
about February 1st, but. is subject to such further delay as may 
be necessary to comply with all conditions of doing business in 
the several Slates. I'.\ the law of New York State, Ibis merger 
is in elfect a consolidation or joining of the two constituent com- 
panies, and does not operate as a practical matter to terminate 
the existence of either of the companies, hut continues both as a 

joint company. Agency contracts will lie continued a- if no 

change in policy forms or merger of companies had occurred. 
A fidelity underwriter contract is being prepared, and in the 
meantime agents arc instructed to use Fidelity Fire Insurance 
Company contracts. 

* * » 

At the annual meeting of the members of the Underwriters' 
km' Patrol of San Francisco, and of the Underwriters' Inspec- 
tion Bureau, held this week, the following officers and din 
for the ensuing year were elected: Bernard Faymonville, 
dent : ( '. Mason K nine, rice-president : Clinton I 

and treasurer. These gentlemen, with Messrs. E. C. Morrison. 

Carl A. Henry, P. J. Devlin and Whitney Palache, coi 

the Board of Directors. 

» * • 

('. I'.. Linaker. chief deputy under Insurance Conuniss 
E. Myron Wolf, of California, will resign to accept j 
with the Pi. Hi. Surety Company, as auditor and assistant 
tarv. 

» • « 

A i the annual meeting if the directors of the Western 
Life Insurance Company, to he held February 16th, the by-laws 

will he amended so as I" admit of the I 

instead ii nine. a> ai present, and Leopold Mich; 
Francisco; A. Q Wishon, of Fresno: Colonel A. P. Jo 
Oroville, ami James A. k. res, of Suistin, will be el« 
Board. 

* • * 

An examination of the Golden *~ [nsurem 

of I oa Angeles has been completed by Chief Deputy and I 
Dei Linaker. of the California Insurance Department. 

* » * 

The Fire Underwriters' Association of Salt 1. 
th annual meeting and elected the fo 
Johnson, president; P. E. Evan; sident; W. E. < 

s W. Colli er. 

sued a warning 
to the operations of one or two unauthorized companies, and the 



Commissioner requests any one having information regarding 
such operations to communicate with the department. 

San Hiego is having a number of incendiary fires, and everj 
effort is being made to arrest the miscreants. 

The Home of New York led in 1909 in the amount of pre- 
miums collected in San Francisco, with $408,974. The Liver- 
pool & London & Globe was second with $385,959; and the Royal 
was third with $271,634. The Aetna collected $228,900; Cali- 
fornia, $110,154; Fireman's Fund, $102,128; National of Hart- 
ford, $126,760; Springfield, .$129,697; Hartford, $118,97+. 

* * * 

PI. F. Avery, who for years has waged a fierce war against 
board companies at Colorado Springs, has sold out and quit the 
business. 



The best in life on 



Golden State Limited 



Strictly limited all the way between 
California, Chicago and St. Louis via 
Los Angeles, El Paso and Kansas City 



See attractions of the Road of a Thousand Wonders. 
By missions and through orange groves. 



Most modern equipment. Parlor 
observation, Drawing room, state- 
room, sleeping and dining car 
service. 



A tourist's delight 
the 

CALIFORNIAN 

The new afternoon train from Los Angeles via 
El Paso for Kansas City, St. Louis and Chicago. 
Standard, tourist, dining and parlor observation 
service. 

Rock Island 
Southern Pacific 

Ticket Offices 
Flood Building Third and Townsend Sts. Depot 

Broadway and Thirteenth St., Oakland 



•THE POT CALLED THE KETTLE BLACK." 
BECAUSE THE HOUSEWIFE DIDN'T USE 

SAPOLIO 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 




wfflwxm 



The week's event at Tanforan Park was nearly as much of an 
automobile meet as an aviation meet. The motor cars of nearly 
every standard make were represented in the turn-nut, and the 
roads and the weather combined to make their experience a good 
deal of an endurance test. ' 

It is estimated, conservatively, that fully six hundred automo- 
biles were present on the first dreadful stormy day, Sunday. The 
better weather of the succeeding days brought out even 2 
attendances. The' old Mission Road, over which mosl of the 
machines made their way. was ae muddy as it ever was, and not 
a few machines came to grief by being badly stuck. Some were 
with difficulty extricated, but there were few other mishaps, in- 
dicating the degree of perfection attained by up-to-date motor 
mechanism. Oddly enough, Paulhan's own car was one of the 
most unfortunate, having become jammed against a freight ear, 
receiving considerable injury. 

The machines were parked in good ordjr, and assembled in 
such large numbers they made a goodly showing. Mud-b 
tered as they were, they bore testimony to the enthusiasm of their 
i iccu pants. 

San Francisco was not the only place that contributed to the 
automobile display. There were machines from Oakland, Ala- 
meda. Berkeley, San Mateo. San Jose, Buxlingame, and even 
Erom such distant places as Santa Rosa and Stockton. 

Among those prominent in the automobiles at the aviation 
meet were parties of which the hosts were Patrick Calhoun, Sam- 
ual C. Buckbee, Henrv T. Scott, Edward M. Greenway, 1. W. 
Hellman, Joseph S. Tobin. E. F. Dimmid. IT. E. Caldwell, Al- 
fred Sutro, 0. C. Bunster. Mayor P. H. McCarthy, Colonel 0. 
\V. Pollock. W. C. Palston, Bush Finnell, J. D. Spreckels, Jr., 
and others prominent in both social and automobile circles. 

Miserable weather marred the aviation meet at Tanforan Park 
this week, and prevented any such spectacular exhibitions as 
characterized the T.os Angeles meet of a couple of weeks before. 
Paulban. it is true, made at least one sensational flight, in the 
face of great personal danger. One thing strongly brought out 
was the seriousness of the problem of aerial navigation in squally 
weather. As Paulhan himself said., a strong wind is not a neu- 
ter of great importance, provided it be reasonably steady. When 
it blows in squalls, uncertain in both force and din, lion, the 
coolness and dexterity and the courage of the aviator, as well as 
the efficiency and the strength of bis machine are called into 
the utmost play. It is worse than the navigation of a marine 
ship through a succession of maelstroms will] rocks all about. 

Indeed, from a strictly technical standpoint, it may be said 
that Paulhan's low flights on Monday and Tuesday, in a strong, 



fitful wind, were quite as eloquent evidences of the progress of 
aviation as his more theatrical ones at greater altitudes, under 
favorable conditions, at Los Angeles, lie has pointed the way 
for other aviators, in the matter of aerial navigation in stormy 
weather. 

* * * 

It would seem that somewhat more liberality and common 
3i n-i as well might be shown in the matter of automobiles upon 
the local ferry boats. Under existing rules, hut four machines 
may be borne on one beat at a trip. The hardship worked by this 
rule upon autoists is self-evident, and nearly every one who has 
made auto trips across the bay has had one or more unpleasant 
experiences when returning to the city by water. 

If four machines may be permitted upon a ferry boat, why not 
more, if there is room for more, as there almost invariably is? 
The machines may all be kept on board until the passengers have 
disembarked, and tints be prevented from interfering with their 
exit, to the dock; there is certainly no more danger of fire from 
the machines' gasoline than there is from the boat's fuel oil, and 
no more danger from the ears' lamps than from the boats' I imps 
and the cigars, cigarettes and pipes of" foot passengers. Why 
this rule limiting the number of automobiles to four? If it is a 
Federal or an insurance ride, it would seem that a little reflection 
would show its folly and lead to its revocation. 

Imagine the plight of an autoist who wishes to return home 
on the last boat, or who has some urgent mission, and finds, upon 
arrival at the ferry slip that there are already four machines on 
the boat, yet plenty of room for several others, without incom- 
moding or endangering any one. 

Some discretion in this matter should be left in the hands of 
the captain of the boat or the dookmaster. At any rate, this limit 
of four is absurdly low. 

* * * 

The Directors' meeting of the S. F. Motor Club was held at 
the club rooms on January 27th. The resignation of Mr. \Y. I!. 
Johnston, the secretary, was accepted for the reason thai Mr. 
Johnston leaves for Chicago, where he will take up the manage- 
ment of the Stromberg Motor Devices Company. The presenta- 
tion of a handsome silver loving cup to Mr. Johnston was made 
by President H. M. Owens in behalf of the members of the club, 
in consideration of the services rendered as the club secretary. 
Mr. E. T. Sterling, manager of the Van Ness Avenue branch of 
the Central Trust Company, was unanimously elected secretary. 



LURLINE 
Ocean Water Baths 

Bush and Larkin Streets 
SWIMMING AND TUB BATHS 
Salt water direc~t from the ocean. Open every day and evening, 
including Sunday. 

Natatorium reserved Tuesday and Friday mornings from 9 
a. m. to noon for women only. 

"FILTERED OCEAN 'WATER PLUNGE" 

THE ONLY FILTRATION SYSTEM 

OF ITS KIND IN THE WORLD 

Spectator's Gallery free to Public 

Branch Tub Baths, 2151 Geary Street, near Devlsadero Street 




$850 



Full of Snap, Fire, 
Vim and Style 



JusSt a relative difference between the larger cars and the Hupmobile; that is, the difference in size— not in 
quality. 

BEAR IN MIND THE PRICE— THEN STUDY THESE SPECIFICATIONS:— 

SPECIFICATIONS: 
ENGINE— 4cyl..20H. P..3 1-4 in. bore. 3 3-8 in. Stroke; L-head 

type; water cooled; offset crank-shaft. 
TRANSMISSION— Selective sliding gears. 



CLUTCH— Multiple disc type; self-adjus'ting. 

REAR AXLE— Shaft drive; Hyatt roller and New Departure 

bearings. 
BRAKES— Two footand two emergency (internal expanding) on 

rear hubs. 



IGNITION— Bosch high tension magneto. 

TIRES— 30x3 inches. 

WHEEL BASE-8G inches. 

TREAD— 56 inches. 

SPRINGS— Semi-elliptical front. 

EQUIPMENT— Two side and tail oil lamps, dragon horn, tools, 

repair kit, pump. 

WEIGHT— 1 100 pounds, regular equipment. 



Telephone Park 6475 



S. G. CHAPMAN 



824 Van Ness Ave. 



Januaby 29, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



23 



Following is the letter written to Mr. Johnston by Presideni H. 
M. Owens, in behalf of the members of the S. F. Motor Club: 

San Francisco, Calif., January %1, 1910. 
Win. R. Johnston, Esq., Stromberg Carburetors, Chanslor & 
Lyons Co., oOl Golden Gate Avenue, San Francisco, Cal. 

My Dear Johnston : Your letter of January 24, 1910, to me as 
President of the San Francisco Motor Club tendering your resig- 
nation as ils secretary, at hand, and contents of same fully noted. 

I regret that we are to lose your valuable aid and assistance as 
our first secretary and practical father of our club, but as you 
are called to the home office to a more important and remunera- 
tive position as the manager of the Stromberg Motor Devices 
Company, we must of necessity accept your resignation ; never- 
theless, we do so with sincere regrets. We, the members of the 
San Francisco Motor Club, each and every one of us, extend to 
you and yours our heartfelt gratitude for the interest you have 
heretofore shown in our welfare. 

With such men as we have found you to be at its helm, the 
company you represent is bound to succeed. 

We wish you success in your future undertaking; your com- 
pany gains a good man. and we here in San Francisco regret the 
loss of a good citizen, a true friend and a live secretary. We will 
miss you more than words can express. 

We congratulate Chicago on gaining a good citizen and a live 
automobile man at our expense. 

Personally, I am sorry to lose your smiling presence as a 
friend, a citizen, an advisor and as secretary of our club, but 
congratulate you on your promotion. 

We, the members of the club which you have worked so hard to 
build up, have prepared a small token for you to take to your nefl 
home in Chicago, and there place in charge of your good wife. 
Keep it, not for its intrinsic value, hut as a token of the brotherly 
feeling thai cadi member of the San Francisco Motor Clul> has 
and holds for you. and may your children's children love and keep 
it as having com.' from the hearts of those who have cherished 
your friendship as true friend; can do, and finally when, one by 
one, we drop away and return to the -ln-i from whence we came, 
may this cup retain iis luster and shape until time shall be uo 
more is the wish of every member of this club. 

Very fraternally, 

II. M. Owens. 

* * * 

With the first appearance in this ,ii\ of aeroplanes has come 

the necessity for airship repair sliops. the lirst one of which is 

established in the mechanical department of the Standard Motoi 

( !ar < 'oiiipaiiv. Ivan L. de Jongh, 

Motor Car Company, reports that, owin to the thoro 

ment of liis repair department, they had air rod B 

commission to make certain repair- ' l'aulhan ■ 

planes. 

"We had two experts this week- al Tanforan," said de -lough. 
"to assist the mechanical corps of exp md we 

Will make arrangements to .-pup our regular repair -hop to 

take care of any work necessary to aeroplaning." 

De Jongh also slated thai < iroplanes would 

be made b\ automobile manufacturers and would eventually be 

sold for $1,000. 

"The piv-eni liuhl between Wright and Curtiss will result in 

another Seidell Talent Contest," said de Jongh; "and it will lake 

several years before the practicability of the heavior-than-air 

machines is proven." 

* • * 

An attractive folder has been issue,! by th 
Car Company, describing its Is 

cut on the cover is one of the hest bits .rapine .le- 

vel produced on circulars of this nature. It is a fin 
tation of one of the P 10 horsepower touring 

li uiilsome architectural background. 

» * * 

Two carloads of Oakland ears will be shipped th. 

- 
land "40s" arrived Tuesday. Two ol them ■■■ 

an I were delivered it) ill the 

■id automobile - used as a itor. 

* * * 

Twentj "Hup-" ire now en route to San Francisco. \ 

part of this shipment already Id, and it - 

that all will be ordered before thev arrive. 



Ivan L de Jongh 



High grade automobile repairing. 
Holley high-tension magnetos. 
Stewart and Holley Carburetors installed. 
Storage Battery charging. 



Golden Gate Ave. and Van Ness, San Francisco 



All Your Car Needs 

is a 

SPLITDORF MAGNETO 

to have the Best Ignition in the world. 

C. F. SPLITDORF 

Pacific Coast Branch, 520 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



The Champion Wind Shield 




NO RATTLE 
Nothing to Work Loose 

It can be placed in any position — upright, zigzag 
or folded and will "stay put." 

It is all polished plate glass and without cross 
bar. 

It is a Protection from Rain, Glare, Dust or Fog. 

It is the Strongest Wind Shield ever Con- 
structed. 

It combines Simplicity- with Strength. 

It affords at all times an Unobstructed View. 

It is GUARANTEED Perfect in Material and 
Workmanship. 

The Champion Wind Shield Mfg. Co., Inc. 

510-512 TURK STREET 
SAN FRANCISCO. California 



NOTICE OF ASSESSMENT. 
Western Fire Appliance Company. Inc. 
.on of principal place of bu.- of Cali- 

fornia. 

- 
li'th <la> an a w m ent ol 

rany. I - office. IMS Gone 

which this asses.-e 

will be an.1. unles* 

- - of advertising and 

R -=«rret»T7. 



24 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januaey 29, 1910. 




Mr. A. P. Warner, of the Warner Instrument Co., of Brloit, Wisconsin,, in lii* aeroplane, lit- is testing the new anemomcli ' 
for the recording of the speed -if the aeroplane. The Warner Instrument Company is the manufacturer of the Automcter. The 
picture is published by courtesy of Mr. I). II". McElligott, heal manager of the Warner Instrument Company. 



A ng tin.' most prominent of those who attended the aviation 

exhibition iliis week was A. P. Warner, of the Warner Instrument 
Co., Beloit, Wisconsin. Mr. Warner has been making a tour oj 
i lie Pacific ('oast in the interests or aviation, of which he is a 
conspicuous exponent. FTe owns the Ourtiss aeroplane and is 
the inventor of the Warner auiometer ami an excellent anemo- 
meter, which records the speed of an airship with accuracy and 
reliability. In the accompanying illustration. Mr. Wanna- is 
seen in High) in the Cnrti-s aeroplane, in the handling of which 
he is remarkably dexterous. 

* * * 

The roads between San Francisco and Modesto are in an ex- 
tremely had condition, according to Oeorge F. Young, the Win- 
ton agent at Modesto, who drove to the city in a little six Win- 
ton. While his ear plowed through the mud and chuck holes 
without any mishap. Mr. 5Toung says ho would not advise any 
one to make the trip at present. 

* * * 

Seventy-two sets of "Nobby Treads" were sold by the Wein- 
stock Nichols Company during the past two weeks. 'This is a 
record sale for anti-skids, and one 'hat will not easily he sur- 
pass! d. Si. heavy has been the demand tor this popular tire, said 
Mr. Robert Weinstock, and their stock ran so low that it was 
lie essary to fill orders by express. Almost daily shipments are 
being received by express until a carload can arrive by freight! 

* * * 

S. J. Craft motored to Del Monte from San Francisco 'I uesday 

with his wife and child. Mr. Craft is from Bellingham, Wash- 
ington, and intends to visit the principal points in California with 
his car. 



.T. L. Whitmore, of Stockton, has purchased one of the popu- 
lar II udson "20" runabouts. 




Choose Your Oil As 
You Would Your Car 

Imperfect lubrication causes more 
trouble, more expense, more break- 
downs than anything else about your 
tjar. There'll be no carbon deposit 
to foul the cylinders and spark-plugs, 
no friction, no oil-troubles if vou get 

IER0LENE 

Auto-Lubricating Oil 

You can count on perfect lubrication at 
all times, under all conditions, entire free- 
dom from trouble with carbon deposits, 
and increased power from your engine. 

Zerolene is made in one grade only, for all fypes of 
cylinders and bearings. Produced in only one place 
in the world. Put up in sealed cans with patent 
spout that cannot be refilled. Also in barrels for 
garage trade. Sold by dealers everywhere. Write 
for booklet, (t 21,000 Miles with Zerolene," Free. 

STANDARD OIL COMPANY 

(Incorporated) 



January 29, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



25 



Millions in Freight on Automobiles. 

That the railroads have had an immense business from the au- 
tomobile industry, both through the shipment of machines from 

the i'aetories and by the stimulus given allied industries, was 
developed in an interview with J. 8. Marvin, General Traffic 
Manager for the three manufacturing organizations, the N. A. A. 
M., A. L. A. M. and A. M. C. A. Mr. Marvin said : 

"The carriers have profited largely by the development of the 
automobile industry in this country. They naturally profit 
through the Buccess and extensive shipments of any industry, 
but this one is exceptionally productive of revenue for the rail- 
roads. An automobile factory will pay the carriers for from 
live to ten times as many freight cars, and at much higher rates, 
than a factory producing an equal number of horse-drawn vehi- 
cles. It is expected that something like 100,000 carloads will 
leave the factories this season. These shipments, of course, ori- 
ginate over a scattered territory, and move to all parts of the 
country ; but if New York to Chicago could be considered the 
average distance hauled, it would indicate that the carriers will 
earn on them about $8,000,000. Taking Detroit to New York 
as the average distance, the carriers would earn about $6, 000,000. 
The factories that produce in large quantities give the carriers 
each day for a considerable portion of the year enough 
loaded cars to make up a good-sized freight train. In addition to 
the machines shipped direct from the factories, the railroads 
carry thousands of shipments to and from races and exhibitions, 
second-hand machines sold, and shipments made by owners and 
tourists. Seventy-five to a hundred carloads will leave New York 
at the close of the Palace and Garden Shows. The exhibitions 
at Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Atlanta and other cities create 
similar traffic. Thousands of tons of coal, material and supplies 
are hauled monthly to the factories by the railroads and hun- 
dreds of other factories engaged in the manufacture of parts and 
sundries arc supported, all producers for the carriers. 'The ex- 
press companies have done an immense business with the automo- 
bile factories,. amounting in revenue to about $1,000,000 per year, 
a large part of which is on factory supplies and sundries. Hun- 
dreds of thousands of travelers use the passenger service annually 
ilinuigh their interest in exhibitions, races, etc., inaugurated bj 
I his industry. 

"The total amount of money invested and kepi In circulation 
is enormous, and has created business for the carriers in" every 
department of their service. Statistics show thai aboul one-half 
of those whe entered the niaiiu I'.-n i u n ng Held have discontinued. 
To those who persevered, the railroads are indebted for an im- 
mense addition to their high-class business in the past ten 

* » » 

The rules governing competition for the Michelin trophy, 
arranged when it was entrusted to the Aero Club of I 
that organization the privilege of modifying ms annually 

to keep up with the progress of aviation, such modifications to 
become efifecl i\ e > , eii ing I be approval 1 1 onors. 

The present rules require that every competitor musl 
member of a club affiliated with the International Aeron 
Federation. \ flight to be accepted must be guarai 
committee ol the club of which the contestant is a member, such 
committee of judj governed entirely by the ru 

laws of the Federal leu. 

The actual trophy is to be reserved for presentation I 
club of which the aviator is a member, who flies the - 
tanee in the 'lnpctition. In the meantime, models 

of the trophy are to he given innuallv to the winning aviators, 

as well as to thi erfaich they are members. 

* » * 

rhal the physicians appreciate the necessity of a perfect anti- 
'ii their automobiles in wel weath - - - town by 
the large number of the new Diamond Grip cas 

them. Among the many prominent purchasers •■: ■ 
during last week was I>r. K. (i. Prisbee. 

* * • 

1!. 1 1 : Diamond 

hell ear. one Diamond I 

run over 8,0 and are still in 

* * * 

11. W. Bo 

(row 

well-know 
the Garden I 



Sometime, somewhere, someone MAY 
make an automobile the equal of the 

Buick 



But never will any-one, any-where, any- 
time produce a better one. 

The BUICK holds more worlds records than 

any other car on earth, regardless of price. 

Consider BUICK Quality, then look at BUICK 

price. 



Buick "White Streak" - $1150 

Buick-30 .... 1550 

Bulck-40 .... 1900 

Bulck-50 7 passenger - 2900 
All F. O. B. S. F. 

Get immediate deliveries now while you can. 



Howard Automobile Co. 

Pacific Coast Distributors 



523-533 Golden Gate Ave. 



Phones: Market 1536 
Home J 2313 



You Are Sure 



of the best of treatment, 

best of goods and most 

reasonable prices at 



Chanslor & Lyon Motor 
Supply Co., Inc. 

San Francisco— Seattle— Los Angeles 

Follow The Crowd 



26 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januahy 29. 1910. 



Tips to Automobilists 

SAN JOSE — Holsberg Bros., 246 W. Santa Clara (opposite Notre Dame 
Convent), upon entering town via S. F, Road. Gasoline, oils, sundries and 
repairs. Seven passenger Thomas for hire. 

SAN JOSE— WALLACE BROS.' GARAGE, Market and St. James 
streets. 20,000 square feet of floor space. Special accommodations for 
ladies. Repairing, sundries, renting. Fire proof garage. Day and night 
service. Rambler and Regal agencies. 

SAN JOSE— San Jose Garage, 400 North First street, Blomdahl & 
Keller, Mgrs. Renting, repairing and sundries. Agents for Goodyear 
tires. Phone Main 121. W. F. Hunt, agent for Chalmers-Detroit, 
Thomas, Buick and O'ds. Phone Main 493. 

SAN JOSE— Step at LETCHER'S New Garage for first-class service. 
We cater to the touring public. Attractive parlor for ladies in connec- 
tion. "Mission Front" garage next to corner of First and St. James Sts. 

SAN JOSE— Lamolle Grill, 36-38 North First street The best French 
dinner in California, 75 cents, or a la carte. Automobile parties given 
particular attention. 

GILROY, CAD. — George E. Tice, general machinist, expert repairing of 
automobiles and engines a specialty. Day or night service, 260 N. Mon- 
terey street. 

WATSONVILLE.— J. H. Covell Garage. Expert machine work, auto 
supplies, batteries recharged, gas engines repaired. Autos for hire day or 
night. Corner Main street and Lick avenue. 

HEAL DS BURG— HOTEL SOTOTOME, J. McDonough, Prop. Only first 
class hotel in the city. Electricity throughout. Free sample rooms. Hot 
and cold water in every room. Baths with suites. Special attention to 
auto parties. Phone Main 50. 



Keenan Bros. 



Automobile Engineers, Machinists and Blacksmiths. 
273 Valencia Street, San Francisco. Telephone Market 1985 



THORPE'S 

ILLUSTRATED 

ROAD MAP ST0UR BOOK 

The only Map which shows actual 
PHOTOS of ForksJurnssCross Roads 

B» nv THORPE ENGRAVING CO. LA. 



PACIFIC 

MOTOR SUPPLY 

COMPANY 

Oakland, Calif. 
Northern Distributors 



Vulcanizing 



MARTLAND, PEART & ELKINGTON 



Phone Market 6370. 



President L. P. Lowe, of the California Stale Automobile As- 
sociation, has notified the members of that organization that (lie 
next work of great importance to which the association's best 
efforts and assistance will be given will be toward the advance- 
ment of Governor Gillctt's $18,000,000 State highway measure, 
which is soon to be presented to the people of the State tor ac- 
tion. A special descriptive letter of the measure, in its details, 
will be sent later to members. President Lowe has also notified 
the members, by circular letter, that, in answer to requests made 
by members for information, he has arranged for mounting the 
highways maps of the Stales of California and Nevada upon cloth 
and in a more substantial cover than that first used. He says: 

"If not less than one hundred members desire their map- so 
mounted, and will return them for that purpose, the work can 
be done for $1 each, this price covering the material and labor 
only, but not the map. 

"Please note that the above price applies to a lot of not less 
than 100 maps. Should the number of maps returned be less 
than 100, the Association will, if authorized so to do by those 
sending in their maps, have the work done ai its lowest possible 
cos) upon the understanding that should it be in excess of $1 the 
members will remit the difference to the Association. 

"Members sending maps for mounting should accompany them 
with remittance of $1." 

* * * 

In order to investigate the conditions for automobile trade in 
In Hawaiian Islands and to make arrangements for distributing 
Ford and Yelie ears in the island territory. Mr. E. L. (hitting. 
traveling representative of the Standard Motor Car Company, 
left recently on the Steamer Siberia for Honolulu. He will 
spend several weeks in Honolulu, and will demonstrate the Velie 
— a new model of which he will take with him. "We have re- 
reived so many inquiries about our cars that we have decided on 
establishing an agency, or representative, in Honolulu," said Ivan 
L. i>e Jongh, manager of the Standard .Motor Car Company., 
"We are sending one of the latest models of the Velie cars and 
expect to increase our trade in the islands as rapidly as pos- 
sible." 

* * * 

"The Firestone Trio" is the title of a handsome art panel cal- 
endar which is being sen! oui to the trade by the Firestone Tire 
and Rubber Co., Akron. Ohio. It is 16%x34% inches in size, 
and lithographed ill twelve colors, and has a large calendar pad, 
making it especially suitable for garage, salesroom and office use. 



42 Van Ness Avenue. 



San Francisco. Cal. 



Phone Park 6544 



L. J. Carl, Manager 



Auto Top Manufacturing Co 

Automobile and Carriage Trimmings 



San Francisco, Cal. 



491 Golden Gate Avenue 



Near Polk 



Tire Cost is Lessened 

THE KEATON VULCANIZING WORKS 

616-618 Van Ness Avenue 

issue a new 

GUARANTEE ON RETREADS 

which should interest all owners. This guarantee is praaically 
the same as that governing- new tires and is moSt liberal in its 
terms. It will pay you to investigate this practical form of tire 
insurance. 

The Keaton Vulcanizing Works 

616-618 Van Ness Ave. 

REMEMBER THE NAME AND THE PLACE 




POPE HARTFORD- WINNING 
PORTOLA ROAD RACES- OCT.33/09J 
256 MlLtS IN 239 MINUTES- » 



Fourteen out of^ fifteen automobiles in the Portola road races 
used Monogram oils. Does this mean anything to you? Moore 
Motor Supply Co.. Los Angeles. San Francisco and Oakland. 



IGNITION 

TROUBLES 

AVOIDED 



and at less expense and inconven- 
ience to you than at present. Rent 
your batteries from Auto Ignition Co. 
545 Van Ness Ave. Phone Market 5678. 



1 herm o i d EKK 



WILL NOT BURN— LASTS INDEFINITELY 

Hughson A * D Merton Z%™ 



REPRESENTATIVES 



544 Van Ness Ave. 
San Francisco 



Jani un 29, L910. 



and California Advertiser 




TON 






PAYING A PENALTY TOR PRIDE 



Many buyers reckoli quality from price. 
It is natural to believe that the higher the 

price, the better the g Is. 

But that idea isn't always right. 
Sometimes it blinds the buyer to bis own 

best interests. * 

* * * 

Wben we take pride in paying a 
price for an article — 

We need to know thai there are manu- 
facturers who play upon Ibis pride — 

Who add to their price (beyond the value 
ol the goods and a reasonable profit) a 
penalty upon pride — 

Swelling (be price to a figure which is 
meant to convince ns thai the article 
must be ' 

* * * 

Tins illustrates the business principle that, 
while we always paj tor whai we 

we sometimes pay tor more than we 



So it is in automobile prii 
Pride ir paj bag a high price 

noccs>:lrll\ get 1 be "'■! car. 






Mechanical authorit i« D the supe- 
riority of the Sis over the four-cylinder 
car, and ■ 

Some fours are right now priced al a 

higher figure than the best si\. 
» * * 

So it isn't alu value 

l'i ii e is only partly based on thi 



Thai is to say — 

The manufacturer must charge in the price 
of bis car not only the cost of i be i i 
itself, but also all of bis ovei hi ad and 
ni I,, re pensi 

Of two ears ol' identical value to the buyer. 

one nci\ cost more to buy bei ause its 
■' er is under hea\ ier overhead or 

other e.\p< 
Thus, one maker pays 30 per cent selling 

emission, and, in additilm to 
riding di\ idends Eoi 
under bonded indebtedness. 

Whereas the otl - 20 per 

ecu; selling i imission and has 

bonded indebtedness. 

The • ker can therefore sell a 

car (every whit as good as the tirst 
maker's car) at a much lower pr ■ 

individual vou. 

Therefore we i mistake when 

infer 'alne from price alone. 

* * * 

All that any automobile buyer can pur- 
chase is a 

Consequently, his choice ought not to be 
of prices, but of cars. 

And the only way lative • 

-ire them. 

* » * 

The maker whi ■ tains real merit 

■ comparison. 

For with h . in equal prii 

vin. 



That's bow Mr. Winton has won. 

b\ putt ing into the Winton Si> ad the 
quality am car can have, and b] elim- 
inating expenses thai do not help the 

car's merit, he has won ireni.-niloii.-lv. 
■ * * * 

is no .'in per cut selling commi 
charged in the price of the Winton Six. 
Not any wasteful factory practices. 
\or any bonded indebtedness. 

Xor any watered stock. 



Thus, the t8-h. p. \\ baton Six 

i a five-p | Under touring 

i ar. « ith all the desirable up-' i 
er the lie 
and at the same lime n I 

as a reasonable profit. 

* * * 

We might lill pages with a descriptia 

the Win! 9 - we have dole' in oiir 

dollara-and-sen! 

Rut the purpose of this advertisemen 

point out ilia' pr 

made that char, we know that. 
if you plan I 
ton- II tinil ont 

S 

* * * 

our - o mail our 

your hon ■ 



The Winton Motor Carriage Company, 

300 Van Ness Ave.. San Francisco, Cal. 

TELEPHONE MARKET 1671. 



28 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 



Representative Garages of San Francisco. 



Washington and East Streets 



Phone Kearny 678 



Ferry Garage Company 

All Workmanship Guaranteed 



Storage Renting 



Supplies Machinist 



Auto Livery Co. 



M. L. Rosenfeld, Mgr. 
Van Nes» and Golden Gate. Phone Franklin 1535 



Golden Gale School ol 
Automobile Engineering 


A. GILCREST 


Automobile 
Clearing House 


419-425 Larkin Street 
Phone Franklin 3391 




San Francisco, Cil 




1910 MODELS HAVE ARRIVED 

S. G. RAYL 

Northern California Representative 

S83-591 Golden Gate Ave. 
San Francisco. 



Never anyone, anywhere will make 
a better one" 



Durocar 

Durocar Automobile Company 



of San Francisco 



38 Van Ness Avenue 



Thomas B. JefFery & Company, 117-126 Valencia St., San Franciaco 



Dr. Byron W. Haines 

Permanently Located 

Suite 507 

323 Geary St. at Powell Opposite St. Francis 

Phone, Douglas 4300 



DR. EDWARD F. GLASER 

EYE. EAR, NOSE AND THROAT 

Office Hours: i to 4 P. M. Galen Bide., 391 Sutter Street 

and by appointment San Francisco 

Phone Doutrlas 4138 



The big Oldsmobile Limited — the six-cylinder type with the 
42 inch jinricksha wheels — is enjoying the distinction nowadays 
of being among the great speedsters of the latest production. At 

the receni race i it on the new speedway at Atlanta, 6a., where 

scores of new world's records were established, the New York- 
Atlanta Oldsmobile Limited, after making the run from the 
metropolis to the southern city, defeated Barney Oldfield at the 
wheel of his great racing ear, and also won the State champion- 
ship five mile event, lowering the State stock-car record. 

This recalls the remarkable midwinter run of the Oldsmobile 
"Mudlark" from New York to Daytona, Pla., and after complet- 
ing the run with a perfect score, the ear was entered in the ten- 
mile State championship event at Ormond Beach the following 
day, and without any adjustment or tuning up, it won this event 
in record-breaking time. 

This Oldsmobile was driven from New York to Ormond Beach 
by Ralph Owen, who is favorably known in this city, having later 
distinguished himself by piloting an Oldsmobile from Los \n- 
geles to San Francisco during a period when the most severe 
storm and the heaviest rainfall ever known on the coast, was in 

progress, and railroad traffic was entirely suspended. 

* * * 

J. A. Nikrent. of the Los Angeles branch of the Howard 
Automobile Company, is in San Francisco for a few days, renew- 
ing old acquaintances. He is welt-known hero, being one of the 
Xikrcnt Brothers who drove a Buiek 40 to a brilli ml victory in 
that grilling Los Angeles to Phoenix trans-desert race, and later 
won the 50-mile free-for-all ai Ascot Park, Los Angeles, with the 
same car. 

Asked concerning his greatest achievement, the l.os Angeles 
to Phoenix victory, Nikrent said: "Without the slightest doubt 
I could have materially reduced the time in that contest if it 
i .i .1 i i ii nesessari to do so to win; there was never a point of 
the entire course where I was compelled to tax my car to its ut- 
most." 

* * * 

The Black Crow is as unique a* iis name in that it supplies 
a complete line of models, all ai popular prices. II. W. Bogen, 
who is coast distributor tor the new models, is selling the cars as 
fasi a- lie can get them. The model "C" roadster is the leader 
of the line turned out by the Black Crow factory, ami it is said 
that it is one of the finest pieces of automobile designing and 

workmanship ever offered at a popular price. 

* * * 

A big Six Winton is being used on an auti bile stage line 

between Folsom and Sacramento, and it has already succeeded 
in clipping the train schedule between those two places exactly in 
half. The charge made for the trip is but slightly more than 
the cost of a ticket on the train, ami the better lime of the Win- 
ton causes it to be heavily patronized. It seldom carries less than 

ten passengers to the trip. 

* * * 

That the Babcock Electric Carriage Company is rapidly soil- 
ing the problem of more speed for the electric vehicle is indicated 
ii\ the announcement thai ii has designed a machine which will 

travel 35 miles an hour. The new car is buill mi gasoline lines, 
having a bood much like that ol' the Thomas. It will he equipped 
with all of the latest accessories, ami altogether will he the class- 
iest ear ever turned out by an electric manufacturer. 



RENAULT "The Car" Guranteed For Life 






NEW PRICES FOR 


1910 






Closed Cars 


Tour 


ng or Runabouts 




complete 




complete 


^■ifK--,»-~~ Vniturpllp 






$1750 


.•*" BMaQ o h p 


(3000 




2500 


10 H. P. 4 ol. 


3500 




3000 


12-16 H. P. 


4000 




32011 


*»»r*\ 14-20 H. P. 


5500 




4500 


18-24 H. P. 6 ol- 


•Little Six" 6250 




5250 


III. 20-30 H. P. 4 ol. 


6500 




5500 


■* 


6800 




5800 


35-45 H. P. 4 cyl. 


7500 




6500 


■V 50-60 H. P. 6 ol. 


Biit Six" 8500 




7500 



ALL CARS BUILT ESPECIALLY FOR AMERICAN ROADS. 



RENAULT FRERES SELLING BRANCH INC. 



316-322 Van Ness Ave., San Francisco, Cal. 



Telephone, Market 7038 



.Ianiaiiv 29, 1910. 



and California Advertiser 



•.".I 




— ?— "Were you ever in the Garden of the Gorls?" "Yes, 
once." "What is it like?" "Lord. I don't know! It wag on 
my wedding trip." 

"I have four daughters and everything is bustle at my 

house these days." "Gee! Are they coming in fashion again?" 
"What?" "Bustles/'— Houston Post. 

"Have any of you farmers been uplifted as } r et?" "Yep," 

answered the visitor from Niwot, "day before yesterday Si 
Simling was hit from behind by an automobile." 

He — So you got that hat out of your weekly household 

fund. How did you manage? She — rWhy, it was awfully easy — 
just had the groceries charged. — Fliegende Blaetter. 

"That woman is heartless!" "Why do you say that?" 

"She devotes more attention to her pet dog than she does to her 
own child." "Hum! Have you seen the child?" — Cleveland 
Leader. 

"Which side won the game?" she asked when it was over. 

"The other side." he said, gloomily. "Why, how can that be?" 
she protested. "Our men are much the muddier." — Buffalo Ex- 
press. 

"What made Miss Scadds blush so furiously? She ig no! 

given to blushing." "Why. the friend behind her leaned over 
and whispered in her ear that the professor was credited with 
having X-ray eyes." — Roch ester Herald. 

"There are few tilings that a woman cannot do better 

than a man can do them." "Well, there is one thing which I 
defy my wife to do as well as I can do it." "And what is that?" 
"Button her dross down the back." — Houston Post. 

Madge — Did you tell him you didn't believe him when 

he told vnu that you were the first girl he'd ever Loved? War- 
jorie — XVi, hut I came right bad at him with another whopper. 

Said he was the first man who had ever kissed me. — Judge. 

"Ezry, I see that since ye have come hack from the short 

course at the agricultural college ve wear yer hair spliced rigW 
down the middle. Nov. iivr's all 1 have to say: if ye expeci to 
feed out o' my trough, ye got to let yer mane fall on 

"Where do all the pins go?" inquired the man with a 

penchani for the curious. "I don't know." answered Mr. Chug- 
gins, "lint since I have been fooling with an automobile, 1 have 
been ahle to tell whal becomes of all the tacks." — Washington 
8tar. 

Tn Brooklyn a maiden named Dolly 

Had no seal and Btood up in a trolley. 

When the mr. with a jerk. 
Goi in its fine work. 

And her seal was the lap of yOWg Cholly. — Jiiili/f. 

"Can I gel the silveT service for the forestry bureau?" 

aired a young man ai the free library. "The what?" asked 
the girl at the desk. "The sih for the forestry bureau 

— the questions they ask von when von take the silver & 
annual ions, j OU k'.ow." 

"John," said Mrs. Paonia, stopping in from of 

store .in S icteenth street, "I am going to buy that hat." FTe 
looked al the miue of wickerwork, horsehair, cluster l 
sprays of cherries, pumpkin vine ami sagebrush. "Your 
be on your own head, then." he answered. 

An attendant at a Kansas institute for the deaf and dumb 

undergoing a pointless rapid-tire inquisition at the ham - 
male visitor. "Rut how ,]o you summon, these poor rn 
she asked, finally, with, what was meant 

pitying glance at the ini by. "By ringing the dumb- 

bells, madam," retorted I ated attendant. — Jv 

"Arc the folks at homer" "Oh, yes, bul i 

it. You see. tile Old M 

ins, and his furs caught fire, and they had to 
the lire department, and they tun 

water fro.-.e as it fell, and now they've built ball 
round him to thaw hi 



Addressing Machine 

FOR SALE CHEAP 

One power drive Bellknap Addressing Machine 
complete with typewriter to stencil names. Will 
address and cut 6000 wrappers per hour. 

Commercial Supply Co., 75 Fourth Street 



Santa Fe 

% w 



12 hours 
quicker 



To 



Kansas City— Chicago 



and 
Denver 



TOURIST EXPRESS 



Leave 

San Francisco 



8:00 p. m. 



every 
day 



Arrive Denver 2:30 p. m. Third day 

Arrive Kansas City 9.05 p.m. Third day 
Arrive Chicago 10:30 a. m. Fourth day 

Other transcontinental trains leave San Francisco 
7:15 a. m. and 10:00 p. m. 

For detail Information phone or call at Santa Fe offices 
678 Market St. San Francisco— 1112 Broadway. Oakland 



Blake, Moffltt & Towne 



PAPER. 



14O0 to 1460 Fourth St.. -San Francisco. Telephone Market 30H 
Private Exchange Connecting all Departments 

Paper of Every Description 

Zellerbach Paper Company 

Saeceedng A. ZHterbach & Som 
Zellerbach Building. S. E. corner Battery and Jackson Streets 




PEPSIN 

GUM 



SUPERIOR TO ALL 



30 



San Francisco News Letter 



January 29, 1910. 




Ehrman Bros. & Co., Distributors 



Phone Kearny 3872 



134-136-138 Front St., San Francisco 



C®aflir@ssn@iM ©IT & IFotfeir 



Yosemite Valley 



OPEN ALL WINTER 

A panorama of ethereal winter beauty, 
beyond description. 

WINTER SPORTS-SLEIGHING-SKAT- 
ING-TOBOGGANING, 



Join one of the Winter Excursion Parties. 

Daily train service, and the fine tourist hotel 
at the Park Line and in Yosemite, make it a 
quick, comfortable trip at any time. 

See GEO. F. MILLER, Genl. Agt., 884 and 673 Market St., S. F. 




MAYERLFS GERMAN EYEWATER IS 

a simple and perfactlj harmless Eyo Romody, for children and 
adalta. 

OFFICE CHIEF OF POLICE, San Francisco— It gives me great pleas- 
ore to recommend to the public Mr. George Moyerle of 9d0 Market St,, 
1 San Francisco I hare been using glasses for the past twelve Tears 
and during that time have conault«d several opticians, but not until I 
had consulted Mr. Qaorgo Mayerlo and had him fit glasses to my ayes 
did I get entire satisfaction. Most respectfully, 

J. H. ANDERSON. Sergeant of Police. 
IT IS MARVELOUS. The effect of Mayerle's Eye Water has been 
marvelous and I shall recommend It as the peer of all eye remedies. 
Tours truly. P. KELLY. Alameda County Hospital. San Leandro. Cal 
G60r$?*3 MaVGrle Graduate German Ripert OpticiaD, charter number American 
** 7 Association of Opticians. 060 Market Street, opposite Hale's- 

Phone Franklin 3379. San Francisco. MAYERLE'S GERMAN EYE WATER. By Hail. 65c. 




ALL KINDS OF RUBBER GOODS 

Goodyear Rubber Co. 

R. H. PEASE, President 

587-589-591 Market Street, at Second 

SAN FRANCISCO 



Murphy Grant & Company 

Wholesale Dry Goods 
N. E. corner Bush and Sansome Streets, San Francisco. 

New Goods constantly arriving and on sale. 



Pitv tin' 



I II KM' 



larried man. Bill ! His is 



Dear Old Pal Bill: 
a Bad, sad lot. 

Here I've been doping il oui I" vm that matrimony takes six- 
teen Srsts and an honorable mention. Forgive me, Bill, I knew 

imt. Three weeks ago there w i to me, one — one only, thank 

Eeaven -of life's greatest joys. This week there came to me 
life's greatest sorrow. 

1 1 was the baby that came three weeks ago, us bouncing a little 
buster as ever digested a safety pin. He had pink cheeks, blue 
eyes, perfectly sound lungs and all the modern improvements 
fond mammas rave about. Better, greater — he had his dad's red 
hair. 

For twenty-one blissful days I was transported on a mental 
|m\ ride, with a number painted in Welsh and all the traffic cops 
suddenly gone Btone blind. 

On the twenty-second day they up and named him Clarence — 
C-Tj-A-R-B-N-C-E. T am in the depths of despair, going down 
for the third time and the man is out of straws to clutch al to- 
day. 

C-I.-A-R-E-N-C-E, and his poor old dad a g I newspaper- 
man. 

Can you picture a national convention going hysterical at the 
mere mention of that name? Can you. in the wildest Bights of 
your imagination, hear the gentleman from Johnson's Crossing 
place in nomination "that sterling gentleman, that able legisla- 
tor, that friend of the peepul — rich and poor, that stout up- 
holdi r and enforcer of the majesty of the law, that stalwart and 
honored descendant of a rare old line of patriots, that son of his 
father, the nexi president of gul-lorious U-nited States. CLA — ?" 

No, you can't, unless it is that you have fallen off again. 

My heari bleeds. As T paw over the ipecac and syrup of 
squibbs at 2 a. m., seeking that phantom, the talcum powder, 
great sally tears drop down over Clarence's nightie, and I track 
up the Boor with them, 

As I walk the floor in silent reverie at 3 a. m., Clarence kick- 
ing in my filiating rib with his heels as he keeps the new cup 
on the beai awake with his cries for more mort, I bethink me of 
in-, ^eat. gnawing sorrow and my jaw drops. 

Ai 1 a. m.. when Clarence had prestigitated with his four 
ounces of certified milk chased with a dash of soothing syrup 
and is boasting an alderman. I drop me off into fitful slumber, 
in which the gaunt spectre of a terrible disappointment throws 
the lits. 

But when I Bteel myself to the worst, turn my back on the 
grim, naked truth thai Gertiehoffmans before my lusterless eyes. 
T kind of like this job of being a new father. Honest. Every 
man. if he only know- it. say I, can be undertaker to the it- 
can 't-be-helpeil. 

For I'm no longer the two-spoi T used to be. The world is 
beginning to fake me seriously. Tt listens when I tell it of 
Clarence's colic, and sympathizes, prescribing everything from 
spanking him under a new moon to Fletcherizing. 

Clarence is a wonderful kid, Bill. I never tire of telling the 

gang al the office about him. Some of them have kills of their 
own, but I'm sure that none of them is a cireumstanee to Clar- 
ence. 1 am sure of it. T can tell il by the silence they maintain 
when I recite to them each morning this or that perfectly cute 
thing my Clarence did last night. Tt's (he same kind of silence 
we used to affei I when Mrs. Ruminghaus would meet us in the 
hall downstairs with : 

"You gents has a fine time; all you do is to eat and sleep and 
work and be happy. 1 wish T wuz young again — they say I 
wuz a line looking -jell when poor, dead Henery Ruminghaus 
married mi — but T ain't, and that's all there is to it. Times 
is sullenly bard for a lady what has to work for a living these 
days. The old skin what owns this old pill box of a house has 
wenl and raised the rent -*10 more; eggs is 'way up in G and 

SOME of the gents in my rooms (mind you, T ain't saving who) 

is sluwer'n I dmi'l know v.hal in paying a poor lady what's her 

hones! dues, an' " 

The things my Clarence does just knocks the wind oui of 

their kills' sails, that's all. And we don't have to call in any 

National Geographical Society to pass on the ease, cither. 

I've bad the little dear's picture taken no less than eleven 
times. And we didn'l need to try to gel him I" look at any old 
birdie. The photographer gave him gas. While all his photos 
were fine, I'm convinced that the science of photography is yet 



. I a n i ai;v 39, L910. 



and California Advertiser 



31 



far shorl of perfection. 1 don't think the camera is invented 
thai would do m\ I Harence justice. 

IM Bend i ii''. Bill, but I'm afraid they'll be wanting the 

only one we have left to print in the paper. Newspapers are 
enterprising as can be these days. They'd be beating on the 
bungalow door to-night if they knew whai a fine looking baby 
Clarence is. I'.ut tin- uews will spread yet. L'd send one to Mr. 
Roosevelt if I only knew just where in Africa to reach him. Do 
yon ? 

I'm fast acquiring the nurse girl glide. Whafs that? Well, 
it's sort of a frat brother to the way folks clown in Lockport, 
N". Y., used to two-step-in the grand Saturday night balls in 
Odd Fellows' Hall. Then again, it's something like the gait 
we affected during that last lap home from Chicago. You'll re- 
member — we thought the fellow that laid those ties had only an 
armful. 

We go calling evenings, my wife and I and Clarence. Cross 
town, up town and down town we go. When we finally get 
where we're going. We sit for several hours under our hostess's 
piano lamp (Mrs. Simpkins says she just knows she gol thai 
with mauve trading stamps — she never would have bought it' — 
and they're out of date besides), and show Clarence off. 

By way of variety in his consistent and persistent refusal to 
laugh for the pretty lady, Clarence cries. Papa runs out to the 
go-cart and out of it fishes the bottle which, according to the 
scientific, rules laid down nowadays by old maid trained nurses 
who never had a baby, has a little trace of milk in the bottom 
of it about the size of a loan shark's conscience. This, papa feeds 
Clarence in silence and in gloom while Clarence's mother and 
the pretty lady and the pretty lady's runt of a husband arc off in- 
specting the pretty lady's new china painting or crocheting or 
darning or something or other. 

'Long about 11:30, when Clarence is pulling the speeder on 
his -JO-iung power, we start home. It seems that Clarence pever 
before realized that his parents were raised in a boiler Bhop; he 
raisesjiis dear little voice so. II seems as though bis fond papa's 
waiter's feet never ached so as he pad-pads along toward the home 
that seems to have been gerrymandered over into the next county 
since supper time, 

After Clarence's Esther has dragged In- wearj Self upstairs, 
lucked Clarence into his little trundle bed, stuffed another bottle 

into Clarence's facia! abyss, pu1 the milk bottles oul on the front 
stoop, he crawls into bed for a catnap until Clarence awal 
Sam IS. Austin in Buffalo Times. 



"Have von any alarm clocks?" inquired the customer of 

a Denver jeweler recently. "Vis. uii'aui." said (he man behind 

Ihc counter. "Alioul what price 'I" "Hi wish to pay foi 

"The price is no object if 1 can get the kind I'm after. What \ 

want is one that will rouse the girl witl I waking the whole 

family. - ' ''1 don't know of .mi such alarm i i that, 

ma'am," said the man. "We keep just the ordinary kin. 
kind that will wake the whole Eamily without disturbing the 

girl." 



The Citizens' Alliance of San Francisco, 980 Merchants' 

Exchange Building, calls the attention of the public to their 
Free Labor Bureaus, located at No. 170 Turk street. San Fran- 
cisco, and 804 Broadway. Oakland. All classes of male help fur- 
nished absolutely free both to employer and employee. 

Wedding Presents. — The choicest variety to select from at 
Marsh's, who is now permanently located at PobI and Powell 
streets; also at Fairmont Hotel. 




Be Clean — Use 

DUNTLEY 

PNEUMATIC 

CLEANERS 

"Not a Toy" 

Electric ind hand power. See our six sites for ho»e 
use from 138 lo $140. with full set of cleaning toots. 

S. F. Compressed Air Cleaning Co. 



Botfi Pnoues 



Suiter and Stockton Sts.. N. ( 



^V 



THE ORIGINAL AND 
GENUINE CHARTREUSE 



has always been and still Is made by the Carthusian Monks 
(Peres Chartreux), who, since their expulsion from France, have 
been located at Tarragona, Spain; and, although the old labels 
and insignia originated by the Monks have been adjudged by 
the Federal Courts of this country to be still the exclusive 
property of the Monks, their world-renowned product is now- 
adays known as 




LIQUEUR 

PERES 
CHARTREUX 

—Green and Yellow— 



At first-class Wine Merchants. 

Grocers, Hotels, Cafes, 

Batjer & Co.. 

45 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

Sole Agents for United States. 



^ 



J 



City Index and Purchasers' Guide 

NOTARIES PUBLIC. 
Martin Aronsohn, Notary Public. All legal papers drawn up accurately, 

107 Montgomery street, near Sutter, San Francisco. Phone Douglas 601. 
Mark Lane, Notary Public and Commissioner of Deeds, 245 Bush St. 
Phone Kearny 2629. 

INVALID CHAIRS. 
Sold, rented, exchanged: manufacturers of Eames tricycle chair. 1714 
Market street, near Octavia. Telephone Fell 9911. 

DENTISTS. 

W. A. Bryant, M. D., D. D. S., Surgery of the Head and Neck. Consul- 
tation hours: 10 a. m. to 1 p. m.; 6 to 8 p. m. 2941 Washington street. 
Telephone "West 1039. 

Dr. G. F. Nevlus, Dentist. Formerly 814 Eddy street, now at room 403 
Westbank Building, corner Ellis and Market. 

ATTORNEYS- AT- LAW. 
Samuel M. Shortrldge, Attorney-at-Law. Chronicle Building, San Fran- 
cisco. Tel. Douglas 2176. 

CHIROPODISTS, 
Drs. R. T. Leaner and H. J. Rlegelhaupt, Surgeon Chiropodists, formerly 
of 6 Geary street, remove corns entirely whole; painless, without knife. 
Bunions and In-growing nails cured by a special and painless treatment. 
205-206 Westbank Building. 830 Market street. San Francisco. 

EXPRESS COMPANIES. 
People's Express Company. Baggage checked to all parts of the United 
States at the hotels and residences In Oakland. Alameda and Berkeley. 
Special attention to trans-bay baggage. Phones Oakland 4447; Alameda 
466; Berkeley 14; San Francisco, Kearny 679. 

RmctlaQC Back to our old location, 623 Sacramento Street between 

niUSIlcS Kearny and Montgomery streets. 

With full line of Brushes, Brooms and Feather Dusters, on hand and made 
to order. Janitor supplies of all kinds. Ladders, Buckets. Chamois. 
Metal Polish, and Cleaning Powders. Hardware. Wood and Willow Ware. 
Call, write or telephone Kearny 5787. 

WM. BUCHANAN. 



White Diamond Water Co. 



Pare Witer for Oaklind 
Abacs* 
Iscorportted Berkeley 

An absolutely sanitary water, neither boiled, distilled nor chemically 
treated, but bacterlologlcally purified by electrical process S cations 
I'ELIVERED FRESH EACH WEEK. JI 10 per month. 91n«ls 6 fsJlon 
bottle. 60 cents. 

Phones: Piedmont 1720 snd Horns A 4U2. 
980 45th Street OakUsd. Csl. 

Union Lumber Company 

Redwood and Pine Lumber 

Redwood Ties, Telegraph Poles. Shinties. Split Shakes. Etc. 
Main Office— Crocker Bid?.. San Francisco 

Yards and Planing Mills— Sixth and Channel Sts.. San Frmncisco 

ALFRED BANNISTER 

EXPERT ACCOUNTANT AND AUDITOR 

'. 424 Post Street San Francisco 

Phone Kearojr 2871 



32 



San Francisco News Letter 



Januaev 29, 1910. 



BANKING 

Wells Fargo Nevada National Bank 

OF SAN FRANCISCO 
No. 4 MONTGOMERY STREET 

Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits $10,948, 970.51 

Cash and Sight Exchange 12.852,206.80 

deposits 25,485,903.03 

Isaias W. Hellman, President I. W. Hellman, Jr., Vice-President 

F. L. Lipman, Vice-President Frank B. King, - - - Cashier 

George Grant, Assist. Cashier W. McGavin, - Assist. Cashier 

E. L. Jacobs, Assist. Cashier 

DIRECTORS 

Isaias W. Hellman Wm. F. Herrin Leon Sloss F. W. Van Sicklen C. De Gulgne 

James L. Flood Percy T. Morgan HartlandLaw Dudley Evan* J. Henry Meyer 

I. W. Hellman, Jr Chas. J. Deerlng Wm. Hass John C. Kirkpatrick F. L. Lipman 

Customers of this Bank are offered every facility consistent with prudent banking. New accounts 

are invited. 

THE CANADIAN BANK 
OF COMMERCE 



Paid-up Capital, $10,000,000. 



Reserve, $6,000,000 



DRAFTS ON FOREIGN COUNTRIES . 

Arrangements have recently been completed under which the branches 
of this Bank are able to issue Drafts on the principal points 
In the following countries: 
Austria-Hungary Finland Ireland 



Belgium 

Brazil 

Bulgaria 

Ceylon 

Cliina 

Crete 

Denmark 

Egypt 

Faroe Islands 

NO DELAY IN 

San Francisco Offic 
some streets. 



Formosa Italy 

France Japan 

Fr'ch Cochin -China Java 
Germany Manchuria 

Great Britain Mexico 

Greece Norway 

Holland Persia 

Iceland Philippine Islands West Indies 

India Roumanla and elsewhere. 

SSUING. FULL PARTICULARS ON APPLICATION. 
Bruce Heath cote. Manager, California and San- 



Russia 

Servia 

Slam 

South Africa 

Straits Settlements 

Sweden 

Switzerland 

Turkey 



The German Savings and Loan Society 

Savings THE GERMAN BANK Commercial 

(Member of the Associated Savings Banks of San Francisco. 

526 California St., San Francisco, Cal. 

Guaranteed Capital $1,200,000.00 

Capital actually paid up in cash 1.000,000.00 

Reserve and Contingent Funds 1,529,978.60 

Deposits, December 31, 1909 38,610.731.93 

Total Assets 41,261,682.21 

Remittance may be made by Draft, Post Office, or "Wells Fargo & Co.'s 
Money Orders, or coin by Express. 

Office Hours: 10 o'clock a. m. to 3 o'clock p. m., except Saturdays to 
12 o'clock m. and Saturday evenings from 6:30 o'clock p. m. to 8 o'clock 
p. m. for receipt of deposits only. 

OFFICERS— President, N. Ohlandt; First Vice-President, Daniel Meyer; 
Second Vice-President, Emil Rohte; Cashier, A. H. R. Schmidt; Assistant 
Cashier. Wm. Herrman; Secretary, George Tourny; Assistant Secretary, 
A. H. Muller; Goodfellow & Eells, General Attorneys. 

BOARD OF DIRECTORS— N. Ohlandt. Daniel Meyer. Emil Rohte. Ign. 
Stelnhardt, I. N. Walter, J. W. Van Bergen, F. Tillman, Jr., E. T. Kruse 
and W. S. Goodfellow. 

MISSION BRANCH. 2572 Mission street, between 21st and 22d streets. 
For receipt and payment of deposits only. C. W. Heyer, Manager. 

RICHMOND DISTRICT BRANCH, 432 Clement street, between 5th and 
6th avenues. For receipt and payment of deposits only. W. C. Heyer, 
Manager. 

Central Tru& Company of California 

Market and Sansome Sts. Branches 3039 16th St.; 624 Van Ness Avenue 
Accounts of individuals, firms, corporations, unions, societies solicited. 
Interest paid on savings accounts. Drafts sold on all parts of the world. 
Capital paid In, {1,600,000. Surplus. $100,000. 
^ B. G. TOGNAZZI, M anager. 

French American Bank of Savings 

Savings 108 SUTTER ST. Commercial 

Interest paid on savings deposits. Loans made on real estate and 
approved securities. 

OFFICERS— Charles Carpy, President: Arthur Legallet. Vice-President; 
Leon Bocqueraz, Vice-President; A. Bnusquet. Secretary; John Glnty. 
Cashier; M. Glrard. Assistant Cashier; P. Bellemans, Assistant Cashier; 
P. A. Bergerot, Attorney. 

DIRECTORS— J. E. Artigues. N. C. Babin, O. Bozlo. J. M. Dupas. J A. 
Bergerot, J. S. Godeau. Geo. Beleney. H. De St. Seine, Felix Santallier 

Safe Deposit Boxes for Rent. 

Anglo & London Paris National Bank 

N. E. CORNER SANSOME AND PINE STREETS 
Capital, $4,000,000 Surplus, $1,500,000 

STG. GREENEBATJM, President; H. FLEISHHACKER. Vire-President 
and Manager; J. FRIEDLANDER, Vice-President; C F HUNT Vice- 
President; R. ALTSCHUL, Cashier; A. HOCHSTEIN, Assistant Cashier; 
F. E. BECK, Assistant Cashier. 

This bank transacts a general banking business, sells drafts, makes 
telegraphic transfers, and Issues letters of credit, available throughout 
the world. Sends bills for collection, loans money, buys and sells ex- 
change and bullion. 



Italian-American Bank 



S. E. Corner Montgomery and Sacramento Sts. 

Paid-up Capital $750,000 

Surplus 210.000.00 

Conduct general banking business. Dealers in foreign exchange 
Officers — A. Sbarboro, President: A. E. Sbarboro Cashier- H J 
Crocker, Vice-President; R. A. Sbarboro, Assistant Cashier 




IF THEY ARE RIGHT. 
1. 

If they are right who claim that after death 
To Nattn-e's humbler types we shall return, 

I only ask that the same Spring-tide's breath 
May find us side by Bide, ;is flower or fern. 

2. 
If they are right, whose more ambitious way 

Claims that to higher spheres we upward trend. 
Oh. wait for me, who, hampered by this clay. 

Fear that too far beyond you may ascend I 

3. 
But these philosophies can never sweep 

From out my heart, a childlike hope of fair • 
Green meadows, where you wait, your eyes all deep 
With longing unfulfilled, till I am there. 

— Nancy Higginson in New England Magazine. 



TEE TUMBLED TEMPLE. 

One day I built a temple strong and fair, 
One niche alone it held, and high up there 
I placed the image that I thought was you, 
My dream of all that seemed most good and true. , 
Each day I went and worshiped at my shrine ; 
What utter faith I gave! What hopes were mine! 
The fragrant incense was each tender thought. 
My heart, and soul, the offerings that I brought. 
Kuthless the hands that tore the veil away, 
Blinded no more, I saw my god of elay. 
With all my strength I tore my temple down 
Till you lay low, despoiled of throne and crown. 
Yet, Samson-like, the price I paid was rare, 
My heart lay buried in the ruins there. 

— Stella Leerburger in Gunter's. 



THE BECKONER. 



One day a vision came and beckoned me 
Out of the still, gray halls, where solitude 
Waits for the guest whose coming must elude 

The mocking eyes of Life and Destiny. 

I followed, and the vision bade me see 

Tin' garden of dreams whose lilies never die. 
The rainbow of Love's promise in the sky. 

The bower of faith, whose walls are mystery. 

Breathless, T cried: "Who art thou?" And he said: 
"My name is Might TTave Bee^i. I am accurst 

By all men. hut my boons shall make thee strong. 

Take on thy lids my chrism of tears unshed, 
My hitter wine of knowledge for thy thirst, 

And for thy breast the barren rose of song." 

— Eha Barker in The Smar 



Set. 



The manager of the sideshow was before the bar for kid- 
napping. "Yes, Judge," he confessed solemnly, "in a moment of 
weakness I sneaked into the museum and carried the fat lady 
away in my arms." "In a moment of weakness!'" gasped the 
.Fudge, who remembered that the fat lady tipped tin- scales a! 

550 pounds. "Great Scott, man! What would you have d 

in a moment of strongness?" — Chicago News. 



Promptness is a characteristic of the Spaulding Carpet 

Cleaning Company. Thoroughness is another, and the housewife 
who entrusts her rugs or carpets to this firm is a walking adver- 
tisement of its efficiency. Every quality that goes to ensure an 
ever-increasing patronage is the practice of this reliable house. 




EaUblUhcd July 20. Ift» 




Devoted to the Leading Interests of California and the Pacific Coast. 




VOL. LXXIX 



San Francisco, Cal., Saturday, February 5, 1910 



No. 6 



The SAN FRANCISCO NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER is printed and published every Saturday by the Proprietor. Fred- 
erick Marriott. 773 Market St., San Francisco, Cal. Tel. Kearny 3594. 
Entered at San Francisco. Cal., Post-office as second-class mail matter. 

New York Office — (where information may be obtained regarding sub- 
scriptions and advertising) — 206 Broadway, C. C. Murphy, representative. 
London Office — 30 Cornhill, E. C England. George Street & Co. 

All social items, announcements, mining, commercial and financial 
news notes, advertisements or other matter intended for publication in 
the current number of the NEWS LETTER AND CALIFORNIA ADVER- 
TISER, should be sent to the office not later than Thursday morning. 

"Back to the farm" is the veal cure for inflated food 

prices. 

The municipal axe cuts deep, and does the work in no 

bungling way. 

The strike of the meat eaters will be reinforced presently 

by the rules of Lent. 

One-man power is not so bad if the one man is great and 

good, and knows a whole lot. 

Pugilist Jeffries quit talking? When did newspaper re- 
porters quit interviewing him? 

Barring the great floods. San Francisco is beginning to 

take on the ways and customs of Paris. 

In St. Louis, the dugs have a mania for biting children. 

Dead dogs are harmless. Try that remedy. 

It is to be observed that ranchmen are not fussing over the 

high cost of living. They have food for sale. 

Meat packers say they will readjust prices. All right. 

only if "readjusted" does not mean re-boosted. 

The new Chief of Police will be expected to make life a 

burden to all evi! doers. Let's give him a chance. 

Lincoln Steffens says we arc contented in oni corruption. 

Is that what makes Steffens so supremely happy? 

Prosperity is here all right, but it is having a tough time 

to hold its own against the high prices for things to eat. 

— — All the Hclch Betchj scheme lacks is assurances 
water will he forthcoming when the dams are in place. 

Fiftj cents for a thirty ccnl breakfast, and fifteen cents 

tip to the waiter, justifies a prompt 

— —Anyway, 'he high price of food _ imething to 

grumble about, which is a positive luxury to most of us. 

All the nations arc gettii to wage a tariff war 

against us. except England, whoso tariff is for revenue only. 

Since L900 the price of bacon has increased 300 per cent, 

hut the supply and the demand have kept about neck and neck. 

Have you heard any one complain of the high price of 

table wines and saloon whisky? And you might include ■ 

The aviation game - ined to put baseball. 

hall and "joy riding" on the retired list of defunct amus 

About one-third of the earth's population have demon- 
strated for ages that they can grow fat and be happy on a straight 
rice menu. 

When cold storage meal and poultry begin to grow whis- 

is justifiable, anil ancient eggs might b 
tin' same way. 

In appealing to the President to chase the dogs off his 

track, Speaker Cannon gulped down a great dish of crow. It is 
a long lane thai has no turns. 

Mm 

ada than in this 
fresh meai 

dia. Belief in a day of judgment is popular these d. 



President Taft's head is getting level. He thinks the 

States can do more for conservation than the National Govern- 
ment. 

If the high flying of prices gets the incentive from air- 
ships, the thing to do is to boycott aeroplanes as a means of 
rapid transit. 

Golfers are not a favored class. They have to stand an 

advance of fifteen cents on every ball, and golf balls are not 
things to eat, either. 

Great interest is being taken in the spring display of 

millinery. But there is small hopes that the Easter hat will be 
less of a monstrosity. 

No doubt there are two sorry men in Washington. Taft 

because he appointed Ballinger, and Ballinger because he ac- 
cepted a cabinet portfolio. 

An Indiana woman has brought suit for divorce on the 

ground that her husband snores. "Give it to her," says he to the 
judge, "and let me snore in peace." 

If all who are grumbling about food prices would organize 

themselves into a political party, what a taking to the swamps 
there would be by the food combines. 

The war of the insurgent Congressmen is a little more 

than a flash in the pan and a little less than a revolt, but it lias 
none of the earmarks of a revolution. 

Perhaps it is as Taft Bays, he is rock-rooted on every one 

of Eoosevelt's policies. Tt is the difference between the two men 
that is calling tin' attention of the people.' 

Australians rank first as the world's biggest meat - 

pet, notwithstanding rabbit* hick as (lie-, no Australian 

would think of eating one cooked or raw. 

The Ballinger-Pinchot affair has gone to mud-raking in 

the slums of partisan politics, and a lot of reputations are likely 
to come out of it all very much bedraggled. 

The very latest and newest political invention is that Taft, 

being pretty sure of his party's nomination for another term, the 
Democrats will take up Roosevelt — and elect him. 

That Pin